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Cooking & Curing from "Charcuterie": Part 2

Charcuterie Cookbook

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#31 Bombdog

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 03:31 PM

On the other hand, yours is sliced much thinner than I could get mine.  Did you slice by hand, or with a slicer?  And if by hand, please post a picture of your knife so I can get one right away!

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Abra, yes I sliced it by hand. My favorite knife is a 12 inch Henckels Pro S chef's knife, nearing 30 years old, which had a pretty cool first user
Regarding the lamb proscuito...I don't believe there is a recipe in the book, nor did Jason post one originally. He just commented on the spices used to cure the leg. I looked at the book recipe that I used for proscuito and kinda winged it.

I'll be pulling it out of the cure tomorrow, and have pictures before I put it in also. I'll post both.

Dave

Edited by Bombdog, 06 April 2006 - 03:41 PM.

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#32 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 03:35 PM

Here are some early pics from my 'Folse' andouille run, which is going on now . . .

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Today's rigging.



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A closer look shows a much coarser cut (1/4" die holes) than the double fine-ground recipe from the book.

I did make some adjustments to the Folse recipe by cutting back the salt from 4T to 3T and including 1t of curing salt for 5.5 pounds of meat. I also worked 1 C of ice water into the mixture when making the primary bind. This recipe calls for hot smoking. So, I'm going to attempt to keep the cabinet at about 175-180 and hot-smoke the links for about 4 hours. In this case, I added ice to the water pan just to extend the amount of time the water would last because of today's variable: I have to leave here in about an hour for about an hour. Who knows what will happen while I'm gone. :wacko: :biggrin:

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#33 Bombdog

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 03:37 PM

This is part of the reason curing is as much an art as it is a science, and note taking is key.

jason

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I agree completely. I have a small hard back journal type notebook in the kitchen that I have periodically used for jotting down things culinary for quite some time. The entire back half is now used to document my charcuterie projects. I find it very useful, if for nothing else, than to refer to for dates and weights. As I have moved towards projects of my own (and Jason's) the incredients are important too.

Dave
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#34 snowangel

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 03:45 PM

Ron, are those paperclips I espie?

OK, gang, it's clear to me that I need to upgrade what I have. A friend has given me her KA grinder and sausage stuffer that she has never used, on the condition that I share some product.

Time for me to finish my drywalling project and get to some sausages.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#35 Abra

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 06:16 PM

Damn, you guys, I'm hooked! I don't watch TV at all, except for presidential elections and bits of the Olympics, but I swear I'm as hooked on this thread as people get on reality shows. I feel like I need to check every hour to see what you all are up to.

Ron, that grind on the andouille sure has more of the look I'm used to. Can't wait for a review of the flavor.

And while I'm here, I'd love any suggestions about this party I have coming up, where I'm having 7-8 eG types over for a Charcuterie Play Day.

I'm looking for a "menu" of things a group that size can all work on, including some minding the smoker (since I have a CharGriller, you do have to mind it), some on sausages, etc. I can do curing in advance, so I thought we could do some bacon, maybe get it going first thing so that hot smoking can go on at the dinner end of the day. The idea is to learn new stuff, eat some killer products, and have stuff to take home. Any ideas what projects would be really fun for an event like this? Andouille? Some fresh sausage? Gyro Dogs? Quick, Dave and Elie, we'd better patent that idea!

And hey, don't you want to have a play day of your own?

#36 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 09:14 PM

The Folse-based andouille turned very well. The stuff is delicious and very near my ideal. It needs a little more tweaking. I think I'd cut the black pepper significantly; maybe even in half. The heat is fine but there is a bitterness which shows up at the finish with that much black pepper. I might add a bit more thyme too.

Here are some pics . . .

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The finished sausages. A bit darker in color than the cold-smoked batch.


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It's a bit hard to tell, but I think the pic reveals the piece identity within the sausage, which is larger than with batch #1.


Honestly, I wouldn't mind this sausage even more coarse, but I don't know if have all that hand-chopping in me. Maybe next time I'll dice a portion of the meat into small cubes and mix it in by hand right before tubing. I also wouldn't use hickory again even though it is preferred in some quarters. Next time, I'll try either pecan or cherry. In spite of the bold seasoning in this recipe, I think the hickory overpowers somewhat.

I think I've zeroed in on how to make my perfect batch of andouille. I make one huge pot of jambalaya each year for that big party we have. If I can master tasso next, I'll never have to rely on 'the kindness of strangers' to get that pot together. But, next up is some lamb sausage . . . and a belly which is just about ready to be smoked.

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#37 Anna N

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 12:33 AM

. . .

And while I'm here, I'd love any suggestions about this party I have coming up, where I'm having 7-8 eG types over for a Charcuterie Play Day. 

Any ideas what projects would be really fun for an event like this?  Andouille?  Some fresh sausage?  Gyro Dogs?  Quick, Dave and Elie, we'd better patent that idea!

And hey, don't you want to have a play day of your own?

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If I could attend I would wish that someone would demo sausage stuffing in action and that some "knife geek" would show me how to accomplish thin slicing of smoked salmon and such. Have fun!
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#38 Michael Ruhlman

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 05:20 AM

Posted Image
It's a bit hard to tell, but I think the pic reveals the piece identity within the sausage, which is larger than with batch #1.

=R=

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The word for the appearance of the interior of a sausage is definition. This sausage has good definition, indeed hunger inducing definition, a healthy amount of fat, aromatic herbs, and dense meat.

A thing of beauty.

#39 jmolinari

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 06:17 AM

This is one of hte pieces of boneless lamb after 30 days curing.
Posted Imagehttp://forums.egulle..._2548_46345.jpg

Here it is sliced.
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Here is the boneless lamb recipe:
1450g piece of boneless leg of lamb (the roasts that come already netted)
150g salt
105g sugar
6g cure #2
15g cracked black pepper
12g fresh rosemary, chopped fine
2g (1/2 tsp) garlic powder

Unwrap the leg, and remove the netting. I trimmed away what is some sort of membrane on the fat (it feels gelatinous and slimy) as much as i could. I really didn't worry about trimming the inside much.

Make a mixture of the above stuff and rub 1/2 of the mixture all over hte meat, both sides, being sure to get into the nooks and crannies.

Put in big zip bag and in fridge for 14 days. Rerub with the rest of the spice/salt mix. Put bag in fridge

1 week later, rince the meat well, and let it soak in 2 40 minute cold water baths, changing the water once.

After that you're on your own to make it look as much like a bresaola/coppa/pancetta as you can. I tried rolling it at 1 piece until i figured out i could get 2 pieces which would be rolled tighter.

Hang at 53F/75%RH until about 35-40% weight loss.

The only change i would MAYBE make, is to soak the meat a touch longer in the water baths. It is ever so slightly salty, but definitely not an eating hinderance on this batch.

jason

#40 Abra

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 07:35 AM

Ron, that andouille looks awesome.

Dave, how did you hit on the half and half double-cure idea? I haven't noticed that in any other recipe. I must say that the end result looks splendid.

#41 FoodMan

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 07:38 AM

Many thanks Jason! It looks great. I will give it a try soon.

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#42 Chris Amirault

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 07:44 AM

I picked a bad week to have the flu! This stuff looks amazing. Jason, I hope you'll put that recipe into Recipe Gullet -- and, Ron, can you write up that Folse recipe as well? I agree with Michael: that is some hunger-inducing definition!
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#43 dls

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 10:05 AM

I picked a bad week to have the flu! This stuff looks amazing. Jason, I hope you'll put that recipe into Recipe Gullet -- and, Ron, can you write up that Folse recipe as well? I agree with Michael: that is some hunger-inducing definition!

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Chris - My guess is that Ron used the Folse recipe from the Gumbo Pages website. It's interesting to note that the andouille recipe here on Folse's own site calls for 2 T of salt instead of 4 and pecan (+sugar cane) instead of hickory. Sort of confirms a couple of Ron's adjustments and observations.

#44 Abra

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 10:13 AM

Has anyone made guanciale yet? I'm going to start some today, and am planning to use this Babbo recipe, unless someone has tweaks that will improve it.

Dave (BD), that's a cute knife story! Chris, isn't pork the approved cure for flu?

#45 Bombdog

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 01:14 PM

Dave, how did you hit on the half and half double-cure idea?  I haven't noticed that in any other recipe.  I must say that the end result looks splendid.

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Abra, did you mean to ask Jason that question? I'm not at all clear on what you are asking me.

Dave
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#46 Abra

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 01:27 PM

Doh! Yes, Jason did the double cure, and I just spaced it out. Sorry.

Seeing no advice on guanciale, I'm set to do the Babbo cure. I only hesitate because I love Armandino's guanciale, and it has some sort of "wild" taste that I can't identify. But endless Googling reveals no secret spice suggestions, so off I go with Mario.

#47 FoodMan

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 02:17 PM

Doh!  Yes, Jason did the double cure, and I just spaced it out.  Sorry.

Seeing no advice on guanciale, I'm set to do the Babbo cure.  I only hesitate because I love Armandino's guanciale, and it has some sort of "wild" taste that I can't identify.  But endless Googling reveals no secret spice suggestions, so off I go with Mario.

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Abra, where did you get fresh pork jowls from? I can never find them here. Only smoked ones are available.

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#48 Abra

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 02:38 PM

I got the pork jowls from Niman Ranch, as well as fresh back fat, caul fat, and the more pedestrian bellies and butts. I just put my jowls in the cure, and was disappointed to see that they were in weird pieces. I'd envisioned something more uniform in size and shape, but I got one large and one small piece. Obviously not from the same pig. But of course that might be an advantage, since the small one should dry faster, the better to eat it sooner.

#49 Meez

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 06:13 PM

I think I'm gonna cry...

Posted Image


That is just beautiful.

I really have to stop lurking here and get in the mix.

#50 jmolinari

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Posted 07 April 2006 - 08:48 PM

Abra, one cure is in salt/spices...the other is hte drying..

jason

#51 Bombdog

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 08:59 AM

Well, I completely forgot to take pictures yesterday when I took the lamb out of the cure and hung it.

On the bright side,

Posted Image

I took the pancetta out this morning

Posted Image

Very happy with the results. I guess I got it rolled tight enough, as it seems fine inside. You're so right Ron, about how difficult that process can be.

Dave
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#52 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:22 AM

Very happy with the results.  I guess I got it rolled tight enough, as it seems fine inside.  You're so right Ron, about how difficult that process can be.

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Well, Dave, it looks like you handled it swimmingly. That pancetta is beautiful. A nice, tight roll for sure. :smile:

Per request, here's a quick version of the modified Folse/Ruhlman-Polcyn Andouille recipe I made. I'll also enter it into Recipe Gullet later today.

5 1/2 pounds fatty pork shoulder or butt, diced into 1-2" chunks
1/2 cup minced garlic
1/4 cup freshly-cracked black pepper (I'd decrease this next time)
2 T cayenne pepper
1 T dry thyme (I'd increase this next time)
3 T kosher salt
1 t curing (pink) salt
1 C ice water
10' hog casings

Mix the garlic, black pepper, cayenne pepper, thyme and salts together. Sprinkle that mixture over diced pork chunks and mix thoroughly. Refrigerate, covered for up to 24 hours. Grind seasoned mixture, once, through a 1/4" die. Then, using the paddle attachment of the stand mixer, slowly add 1 C of ice-cold water to the mixture until it becomes a sticky, homogenous paste (1-2 minutes).

Tube off the mixture into hog casings and twist the casings into links. Let the links dry, uncovered in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours. Once dry, hot-smoke the links at about 180 F, over the wood of your choice. I used hickory on my first try. Next time out, I'll try pecan or cherry. Smoke for 3-4 hours or until the links reach an internal temperature of 150 F. Once fully smoked, dunk the links in a bath of ice water to impede any carry over. Dry links and refrigerate them.

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#53 Abra

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:24 AM

Jason, I actually meant the process you used of putting half the cure on the lamb, refrigerating it for 2 weeks, then the other half of the cure and back into the fridge. That seems novel.

By coincidence, my calendar tells me that my prosciutto might be ready today too. It's been hanging for 2 weeks - how long did yours hang, Dave, to look the way it does today?

I have a wood question. I've been looking for a local source of apple, cherry, or maple wood, so that I can have logs or big chunks instead of having to use chips. I found a guy with a bunch of cherry, but here's the thing. It's not dry, as in kiln-dried. It's been cut, but outside, for a year. I'm not clear on the science of wood drying. On the one hand, it seems like I'm going to soak it anyway, so wet wood is ok. On the other hand, it also seems like in the drying process some volatiles, not water, are probably emitted from the wood, and that their presence in wet wood might not be desirable for cooking. Any ideas? And how about bark, on those fruit and nut woods? Do I need to strip the bark? On alder I've been leaving the bark on, but alder has a very thin bark.

#54 Bombdog

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 09:34 AM

By coincidence, my calendar tells me that my prosciutto might be ready today too.  It's been hanging for 2 weeks - how long did yours hang, Dave, to look the way it does today?

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Abra, I hope you meant your pancetta, not proscuitto. Mine was cured for 10 days and then into the curing chamber on March 22.

Dave
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#55 Bombdog

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 10:02 AM

I guess this is my lucky day. When I checked my notes for Abra, I discovered that the Tuscan salami should be ready.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Flavor is wonderful, nice and firm to the touch. I'm pretty full of myself today!

Dave
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"Got what backwards?" I ask.
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#56 Pallee

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 10:50 AM

Abra, I always take all the bark I can off wood I'm using to cook with as the bark can cause acrid smoke. I think you're fine using wood that's been seasoned a year, even if it's not bone dry. I used to live next to an orchard and got trimmings all the time and they were fine after even a summer.


That salami looks great! And I can't wait to make the andouille!

#57 BaconFat

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 01:04 PM

I have a wood question.  I've been looking for a local source of apple, cherry, or maple wood, so that I can have logs or big chunks instead of having to use chips.  I found a guy with a bunch of cherry, but here's the thing.  It's not dry, as in kiln-dried.  It's been cut, but outside, for a year.  I'm not clear on the science of wood drying.  On the one hand, it seems like I'm going to soak it anyway, so wet wood is ok.  On the other hand, it also seems like in the drying process some volatiles, not water, are probably emitted from the wood, and that their presence in wet wood might not be desirable for cooking.  Any ideas?  And how about bark, on those fruit and nut woods?  Do I need to strip the bark?  On alder I've been leaving the bark on, but alder has a very thin bark.

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I've been getting my smoke wood from barbecuewood.com. They are way cheaper than local (Seattle) sources and the quality is good.

Wood should be dried covered for at least a year, so you're probably ok.

I never soak smoke wood. I think it just delays the inevitable as the water needs to evaporate in order to smoke.

I don't like wrestling small chunks of wood and losing, so I take the bark off if it looks like I can get it off easily.

#58 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 01:29 PM

Dave,

That Tuscan salami is simply glorious. How many of those have you done? What are the potential pitfalls that a first-timer should keep in mind?

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#59 Bobby 2 Shakes

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 01:55 PM

I was making a garlic sage brine for 8 1/2 lbs of what was marked "pork picnic shoulder" at a local Korean supermarket (Hmart) when I realized there was another application for something I had in my freezer. I keep a 72 oz plastic mayo jar filled with water (becomes ice, duh to the duh power) to keep the freezer cold and take up empty airspace. The original idea was to chill my hands when my wife said they were too hot in the summertime.
Anyway, I found that the ice in the jar cools off the brine faster after heating it up. Being the analytically retentive person that I am, I first wrapped it with 2 sheets of plastic wrap first, to keep the jar clean to use another day.

#60 Bombdog

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 01:56 PM

That Tuscan salami is simply glorious.  How many of those have you done?  What are the potential pitfalls that a first-timer should keep in mind?

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Thanks Ron.

Hard as it may be to believe, that salami was my first curing project. I followed the recipe in the book to the letter and never had one bit of a problem. I checked them at the recommended time and decided another week was a good idea. At that point, they were just a bit softer than I thought they should be, although the taste was great.

I'm guessing <knock on wood> that it was just beginners luck. Michael speaks to so many things that can go wrong that I was pretty much resigned to having some sort of problem.

I can't see you having any problems with the project Ron. Other than the curing time, they really are not any different from so many of the other projects you've already done.

Dave
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Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.






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