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  1. Past hour
  2. liuzhou

    Fish Sauce

    Megachef is Thai; Red Boat is Vietnamese. That said, Megachef make two different fish sauces - a Thai style in a brown bottle and a Vietnamese style in a blue bottle. Which do you have? Amazon usually stocks Wangshin brand of Korean fish sauce. I've never had it but reviews are positive.
  3. liuzhou

    Fish Sauce

    The first time I went to Burma / Myanmar was by accident and I had stupidly wandered into a battleground where the local Shan militia were fighting in resistance to the ruling military junta. I had no visa and wasn't even carrying my passport. When I realized I had accidentally crossed the border from China, I decided this wasn't perhaps the best time to investigate the local fish sauce, so I turned and ran back across the border before either side decided to shoot me as a spy. A few years later, when the junta relaxed its grip a bit, I returned, this time legally and found ငံပြာရည် (ngan bya yay), Burmese fish sauce. Burmese food instantly became one of my top three favourites. The sauce was and probably still is very close to the Thai version. In a village near Dawei, I saw boatloads of anchovies being unloaded and driven to a processing plant which I didn't visit but certainly smelled. Burma Love brand fish sauce is apparently available in the USA from Amazon Prime, but be aware it is made from fish imported from Vietnam and salt from Thailand. Despite the company's name, their website describes it as Vietnamese. Burma Love Anchovy Sauce So far as I can determine Burmese sauce from actual Burma is unavailable, possibly due to sanctions. Do not confuse Burmese fish sauce and ငါးပိ (ngapi) which is a pungent fermented paste made with fish or shrimp. ငါးပိချက် (ngapi jet) is the most commonly seen. Ngapi - image my.zegobird.com
  4. Today
  5. AAQuesada

    Fish Sauce

    Pretty cool I have MegaChef & Son fish sauce (a newish brand that is similar to Red Boat). Now I am curious to try a Korean style fish sauce!
  6. Neely

    Lunch 2024

    The above looks delicious @blue_dolphin. I love mussels, thanks for the link. We had lunch out today at a country ‘pub’ ( hotel ). It was a pleasantly warm day and we enjoyed eating outside. Meal was pork belly (sous vide, then grilled, I guess ) rocket salad with apple & walnuts, red cabbage and puréed celeriac.
  7. Further to the roe / fish egg post a bit above, I just came across these on the local food delivery app. Grilled soy sauce marinated beef skewers with unidentified fish roe. 5元 / 70 cents US per stick (minimum order 8). I'm tempted.
  8. liuzhou

    Fish Sauce

    First recorded in China in the 7th century CE, fish sauce was once much more common across East Asia, but fell out of favour and was replaced by soy sauce when that became the seasoning of choice in China, Japan and other Asian countries. Fish sauce remained dominant mainly in S.E Asia, but pockets of resistance to soy remained in places today less well known for fish sauce use. Also, in recent years there has been a revival of interest and small producers are popping up from Japan to China and beyond. One pocket is 潮汕 (cháo shàn), an area comprised of 潮州 (cháo zhōu), Chaozhou and 汕头 (shàn tóu) Shantou cities and surrounding districts in Guangdong Province of China. The area is home to the Teochow people (they call themselves Chiu Chau) who have their own culture, language and cuisine. The cuisine, somewhat unfairly considered a subset of Cantonese cuisine, is well known internationally. If you've ever eaten an oyster omelette in a Cantonese restaurant, you've eaten Teochow food. They are noted for their seafood dishes. 潮汕砂锅粥 (cháo shàn shā guō zhōu), Chaoshan Sand Pot Congee with seafood is my death row final breakfast choice. Also, beef is often a common protein here, more so than generally in Cantonese cuisine. In 2021, 菁禧荟 (jīng xǐ huì) became the first Chaoshan restaurant to be awarded a Michelin star. Unfortunately, the restaurant is in Shanghai. Michelin inspectors seldom venture out if their comfort zone. But the main point here is that Chaoshan uses fish sauce! 潮汕鱼露 (cháo shàn yú lù), Chaoshan fish sauce is legendary but extremely difficult to find outside the area - it isn't even easy in China. I have to ask a friend who lives near Chaoshan to send me some, but she struggles, too. Aged for between one and five years and lighter in colour than many fish sauces, it is used to season not only seafood dishes but to add salinity and umami to all kinds of dishes. 5-year-old Chaoshan fish sauce - image from manufacturer. If I ever find it locally, I'll buy the store's entire stock. It keeps for years but I'll probably be back at the store in months, begging for more.
  9. MaryIsobel

    Dinner 2024

    We are a good 5 months away from fresh corn but that and the halibut are mouth-watering!
  10. Kerala

    Breakfast 2024

    Pinhais again, with hard boiled eggs. That's a black coffee to the side, not a glass of red wine. Those days are only for some boys' holidays. Just realised this was the "before" picture to the one above, but it just adds a bit of context, right?
  11. C. sapidus

    Dinner 2024

    Beer-battered halibut and our first corn of the year, courtesy of Mrs. C
  12. Kerala

    Breakfast 2024

    Pinhais breakfasts are always good!
  13. Kerala

    Breakfast 2024

    Self-explanatory except for the dusting of bottarga.
  14. Yesterday
  15. blue_dolphin

    Lunch 2024

    Québécois Mussel Chowder with Cod and Cider from Roast Figs, Sugar Snow by Diana Henry. Recipe available online at this link. Seriously delicious for something so simple.
  16. Hey I know this is years late but here is a mousse recipe I used that never failed me.
  17. Too funny! I did a small poll (my raised-Catholic husband) and apparently some denominations don't celebrate Shrove Tuesday with pancakes, but American Episcopalians certainly do. I've never belonged to an Episcopal church that didn't do a pancake supper on Shrove Tuesday. @RWood - that strawberry cake and the macaron are just breathtaking. I'm truly in awe.
  18. I have several of the so good magazines and I would say the books that have all the recipes are better investment than the actual magazines. Also pastry chef magazines or is it pastry arts magazine, cant remember but that one is also good and they are all digital copies of every magazine they have done for like $20 a year.
  19. C. sapidus

    Breakfast 2024

    Cheesy soft-scrambled eggs topped with fermented radish
  20. I've been asking for Seville oranges every week at the farmers market and I finally got some yesterday. Thirteen oranges weighed in at 6 lbs 4 oz or 2.83 kilos and cost $10. I've gotta give these big bumpy boys a good scrubbing and run to the store for more sugar before I get going on the marmalade.
  21. Would. Especially at the rim edges, base scuffs and scratches. Followed by weakening of the bond 'twixt aluminum, primer and PTFE. Probably exacerbates thermal aging. Some night when you can't sleep... https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6412/11/11/1419
  22. Yeah, looks the same, apart from I used Golden Syrup rather than light corn syrup (which may account for mine looking a touch darker).
  23. I made some more powder puffs. Chocolate and chestnut... And because I forgot to add cocoa powder to the dries first time, another batch of raspberry and rose... The chestnut ones were decidedly 'meh'. But I'm getting quite a taste for the raspberry rose combo. Imagine an oversized, ultra-soft macaron and you get the idea. Also this week, more Fat Rascals... I candied some orange peel for this batch, but I'm embarrassed to say that the main reason for making them was to figure out the best placement of the cherries and almonds so that the face wasn't too wide-eyed and gap-toothed. 🙄 Banana Pudding isn't really a thing in the UK. I guess the closest thing is trifle or banoffee pie. And here in France I think I've only ever seen one patisserie with a banana desert (tarte banoffi) when I lived in Lyon. Anyway, this Banana Custard Pudding had been on the to-do list for a while... It might look a bit crunchy but the main body was actually very soft where the cream had moistened the biscuits/wafers. Overall, I wasn't especially taken with it: the condensed milk pastry cream was bland, the bananas didn't punch, and it was all too soft and samey. But seeing as it was a pastry chef's 'take' on Banana Pudding I was curious to dig around. After reading Felicity Cloake's article on the matter I made her version... My only additions were chopped walnuts to the layers, and brûléed bananas for decoration. This was an improvement; the knock-off Nilla wafers held up better and maintained some texture rather than turning to mush, and the pastry cream was spot-on - I even liberated a precious vanilla pod from my stash. (Oh! the luxury.) But I was still left wondering "where's the banana?" If something's called Banana Pudding then call me crazy for wanting a banana slap in the face. Having not grown up with this in my life, maybe I'm missing the point. It also might be a mistake to follow two English cooks' recipes. (I've seen enough horrific international versions of 'English Trifle' to know a lot can be lost in translation.) Next time I'll infuse the pastry cream with banana (à la Stella Parks), ditch the brûléed bananas (the caramel quickly dissolves and stains), sprinkle some crunch on top, and maybe add a little salted caramel here and there for variety.
  24. The thing with leeks, assuming they're sliced crosswise and are separating into rings, is that the thinner, outside rings can go from lightly caramelized to blackened while the meatier inside rings are still softening. So if caramelization is the goal, best to use thicker slices.
  25. I've only ever seen them, or mention of them, dried here. My 40 year old bay 'tree' is unfortunately thousands of miles away in my daughter's gazebo in London.
  26. Yes. Based on personal experience, it's worth it, so I'm guessing it's the former. However, if you're short on time, you can slowly melt some store-bought caramels then gently pour them over the leeks.
  27. I'm hitting a paywall for the SF Chronicle but David Lebovitz has a recipe 'adapted from Nichole Accettola' that calls for 200 g butter, 200 g sugar, 100 g corn syrup, 300 g flour, etc. Are those the ratios you used?
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