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pedro

Thanks to Ferran Adrià and his team!

13 posts in this topic

It's been a pleasure and an honor to have Ferran Adrià with us answering the questions asked by eGullet Society members. From the beginning, we've found a warm welcome from everyone on the elBulli team regarding this initiative.

In the afternoon of the most important day of the Q&A, at elBulli's Taller, chef Adrià was hosting a foreign film crew engaged in shooting some videos, This was followed by a large group of cooks from the UK who were visiting the premises, plus phone calls and the development of new dishes. Amidst this continuous flow of activities, Ferran locked himself for several hours in the conference room at the former chapel to answer the questions you submitted. In his own words, this is the room to which they retreat "when everything else has failed" and they need to figure out a solution. We weren't in that critical situation the other day but surely the quiet environment helped in the achievement of the final result.

I'd like to thank also Albert Adrià, who dropped by while the Q&A was proceeding and spontaneously joined Ferra in contributing with his view on the question at hand.

Aintzane, Ferran's assistant, asked me not to disclose her surname. I will respect her desire, but I must say here that all this wouldn't have existed without her help throughout the process. Some months have passed since we first talked, back in early August, but the result has definetely been worth the wait.

Please join me in thanking Ferran Adrià for the time and effort he devoted to spend some time with us. We'll make sure your words reach his eyes.


PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

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Chef, Thank you so much for your time and the insights into your creativity and your food that you provided us. I am looking forward now more than ever to visiting El Bulli this summer.

Thanks also to Pedro for doing an extraordinary job in working with Chef Adria' to set this up, translate and convey his nuances.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I'd like to add my thanks to everyone involved. Foremost our thanks go to Chef Adrià and his team for the time they've taken from what we all know is a very busy schedule, and for the effort to communicate the ideas and philosophies that drive elBulli's restaurant and laboratory/workshop. On behalf of both eGullet Society's managers and membership, I'd also like to deeply thank our own Pedro, host of the eG Spain and Portugal Forum. I'm well aware of his dedication to this project and know that it would have come off without his persistence. For that, we're all appreciative. I'd be remiss if I didn't thank all the members who contributed, and that includes those whose very worthwhile questions did not get answered in the short amount of time Pedro and Ferran were able to arrange together. Without these earnest questions, there would be no reason for the session. Last, but not least, I'd like to thank our many member and nonmember lurkers. Knowing you are reading what's on the eGullet Society web site and that we operate both as an interactive medium for some and as a passive media for reading for so many others is also incentive for us to do what we do here. Nevertheless we'd like to invite you all to join us on the eG Forums.

Chef Adrià, this has been a great opportunity for us and you've helped us maximize it, but I'd like to think we can improve the medium of the internet and hope we can invite you back again in the future and extend the potential we have for discussion food and cooking. Thanks again.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Chef,Thank you so very much for taking time out of your very busy schedule to answer our questions,Your a fascinating chef and a gracious man.I would personally like to thank all the eGullet personnel who made this a reality,your efforts are appreciated(you all just made the Christmas card list!!) Gracias!!

Dave s


"Food is our common ground,a universal experience"

James Beard

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As an example of one of the "lurkers" to your Q&A, I want to thank you, Chef Adrià, for spending some time with us, starting by asking a great question that turned into one of the best threads we've had on this site, and treating the questions you got so seriously. I did not think I had anything to add to the give-and-take, but it sure was compelling, to say the least! You are a very interesting thinker!

And Pedro's efforts that made this Q&A possible, while ultimately proven not to be superhuman, were truly awesome, using that word in its original meaning. Awesome, awesome! You should get paid for this! :smile:

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Thank you, Pedro, for pushing this event forward; thank you to everyone who assisted in translating the questions and creating the time and the space for Ferran Adria to answer them; and thank you, Sr. Adria, for agreeing to spend some time with us discussing food, cooking, and your philosophy of gastronomy. I may never get the opportunity to dine at a Fast Good, let alone elBulli, but I found this exchange as satisfying as a ripe tomato with a little salt sprinkled on it (to inject another example of simple "ideal" eating).


Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Chef Adrià, it was a great pleasure having you here on eGullet. Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk with us.

Thank you Bux and pedro for making this happen. I first found this forum via a Google search for "el bulli". Having Chef Adrià join us here is a very exciting "Special Feature" indeed!

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Chef Adria, thank you for taking the time but also for recognizing the importance of and making use of the internet to reach and interact with so many people.

And to pedro, thank you for all your efforts in making this happen.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Let me add a few more comments. My primary goal above was to thank Chef Adrià for his time and effort on this project. It's hard to imagine how busy he is even in the off season. elBulli's Taller is an incredible hive of activity with many parallel activities at once. Despite the pull on his attention from all this activity, he locked himself in the conference room, devoting several hours to answering the questions. Thus I felt a great need to express my thanks to him and his team.

On the eGullet side, it has been a team effort. Many people have participated in making this forum a success. Víctor de la Serna (vserna), a well known food writer in Spain, editor of one of the largest newspapers in the country, El Mundo and a member, personally interceded with Juli Soler on our behalf. Many members of the eGullet Society staff and management team added their contributions mostly behind the scenes. At risk of forgetting some names, these come immediately to my mind: Richard Kilgore, Bux, Andy Lynes, Brooks Hamaker, Jason and Rachel Perlow, Robert Brown, Fat Guy, . . . So don't let yourself be fooled by the tip of the iceberg. :wink:


PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

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Since I too was one of the "lurkers" who did not post a question, I'd like to thank Chef Adria for his time, effort and interest he took to communicate with us. It is rare to find a famous chef give so much of himself.


WorldTable • Our recently reactivated web page. Now interactive and updated regularly.

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And here's another grateful lurker who wishes to thank everyone involved. It was fascinating reading. I think I now have a better understanding of Chef Adrià's hopes and enthusiasms.

If the wheels of fate turn in the right direction, here's hoping that I will dine at elBulli in 2006!


Charles Milton Ling

Vienna, Austria

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Thanks very much, Chef Adrià! I'm grateful for your efforts -- and for your generous, collaborative humanity. We here at eGullet strive to create an informed yet supportive community across our many differences. Your comments about food, cooking, and people are inspiring.

And please do enjoy your sabbatical! You deserve it!


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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