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Found 1,299 results

  1. I tried to cook BBQ Baby Back Ribs last week. I vacuum pack my ribs with salt and pepper and a light clothing of BBQ sauce and SV for 24 hours at 68 deg C. It turn out dry with a lot of liquid in the bag. I tried to BBQ on grill at high heat for a short time for the BBQ taste. The area that is on the grill is freally dried but over-all result is not good even with a generous layer of my favourite BBQ sauce. Have any one SV baby back rib beore and what is your experience?
  2. NOTE: This continues the discussion in What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 1) A New Zealand Strip Steak. The animals are kept on what they call a zero, zero program. No antibiotics, no hormones, grain fed with no gmo. Lightly seasoned, and into a 129F bath for 2 hours. Seared on the little BGE and served. ]
  3. FOOD BRETHREN! I need some advice. I have one last piece of pork belly confit in the fridge. I brined these bitches for about 5 days (brine included pink curing salt), vacuum sealed the squares of pork belly with lard and sous vide them at 158 F for 16 hours. I cooked this on 11/10/16 and its been in my refrigerator since. Here is the general recipe I followed, with some modifications based on my taste: https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/... The last piece is still vacuum sealed and submerged (mostly) in lard. Any visible pork only has contact with the bag. It's staring at me. And calling my name. I want to deep fry this sucker and have a little date night with the handsome devil I see in the mirror every morning, but the last thing I want is spoiled food. I can't find any conclusive information about how long pork confit lasts for. I've only seen references that duck confit or in general that the confit technique will last for months in the fridge. I have found no sources which directly addresses pork confit. Questions/Factors I'm Considering: - Does pork confit keep for as long as duck confit? - Does vacuum sealing have any effect on the length of preservation? - Does sous-vide cooking method affect the length of preservation? I know I am probably being a bit paranoid, but I thought I would do my due diligence before taking the plunge, so to speak. Any advice on these questions would be extremely helpful and appreciated! The Franzisaurus-Rex PS - you should totally make this if you are into sous vide, confit, food, or have any respect for the enjoyment of life. Flash-searing these things after cooking was OUT OF THIS WORLD.
  4. Can anyone illuminate me on the appeal of cooking meat by putting it in a plastic bag and boiling it? I've had this at many a (fine) restaurant and I fail to appreciate the ecstasy at which some seem to undergo when encountering (or offering) this preparation... Short of sounding absolutely ignorant, I realize that the technique affords great advantages to some products (like foie gras), but chicken? pork? Tender as they may be, I prefer a more natural way of "sealing" food - perhaps the age-old bladder or other non-porous offal I ask only because I wish that I could be "enlightened" and join the swooning masses when offered this preparation at a restaurant... U.E.
  5. Serving Champagne and Other Carbonated Wines

    The NY Times has a current article in the science section "A Universe of Bubbles in Every Champagne Bottle". The article asserts that it is better to serve Champagne at warmer than refrigerator temperatures so that the bubbles are larger and convey more flavor. Also to serve in a narrow glass. However Gerard Liger-Belair (who is referenced as an authority in the Times article) points out in his book Uncorked (forward by Herve This) that the colder the wine the more viscous and the more dissolved CO2. Liger-Belair also prefers a goblet to a flute. I bought Uncorked after reading about it in Liquid Intelligence from Dave Arnold. Discuss.
  6. Pasteurizing Eggs Sous Vide

    In Douglas Baldwin's book he states to cook at 135F for 75 minutes. My questions are: 1. Does this change the consistency of the eggs? 2. Would I still be able to use them to make eggnog or in a shake? 3. How long can you keep them in the refrigerator?
  7. I made a Gellan based fluid gel that I think is 'too thick'. (One could say, I'd like more fluid and less gel!) Anyone know what the best way, if any?,there is to thin it so I can squeeze bottle it? at the moment it's spoonable but way thick. Could I add water and blender it again? or is there another idea? thanks in advance.
  8. [Moderator note: This topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the earlier part of the discussion is here: Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine at Home" (Part 1)] I have been cooking out of MC@h for a few months now and haven't found this forum until recently. I thought I would stop lurking a participate as I have tried many of the recipes with great success, as well as had some pretty spectacular failures I mean who hasn't? Last night I decided to try the pressure cooked pork belly adobo I served it like a lettuce wrap with some sweet onion, diakon and cilantro and it turned out fantastic. I wish I had taken a picture. For those who have made the adobo it is rather rich and I want to add something more to cut through it a bit and was thinking of a foam so I can practice with my new whipping siphon. The addition of the lettuce cups with the onion and diakon helped a bunch I just think it needed one other element to really balance it out. Any thoughts on what you would use? -Erik
  9. HI guys, I'm here for a bit of advice. We are building a house (in Croatia, Europe), and finally have a chance to build a kitchen as i want it We would like to get a professional combi oven, something like this new Rational (a bit pricey) or this UNOX (better price) so that we have a long term solution for our needs. The reason we are going for the professional oven is that, for example UNOX, is cheaper than "home combi ovens" from brands like Miele, Gaggenau, etc. and are much better than those. Does anyone have any experience with pro combis at home? i have only seen a couple of people, at least on the internet, that have them at home. I guess that setup would not be a problem, because we designed a water inlet and outlet for the oven, and the voltage is OK. is there anything we didnt think of? Will that oven have higher maintananace cost, even if its used only couple of days a week? Thanks for help P
  10. Hello, This is my first post here -- apologies if I'm making any mistakes on protocol -- I have spent some time checking prior posts but this seemed the best place to jump in. I have a 13lb skin-on, loin attached pork belly I'm going to cook for Christmas dinner. Coincidentally I also have an Anova sous vide circulation heater and a new plastic tub with a lid. The recipes I've saw mostly call for seasoning, a water bath for 36 hours and then a deep or pan fry to crisp. Now I have the setup, and look at the combination of the roast and the container I realize I have some questions about what I'm doing -- I've attached a picture below of what we're starting off with. Here are those questions: The fit seems a little tight to me -- is the container size fine? I was planning on seasoning, tying and double bagging it in large ziploc bringing bags ( water displacement, no vacuum sealer ). I've convinced myself the ziplock method is fine, but is standing the meat vertically in a space close to it's dimension for a 36 hour cook ok? After the 36 hours in water, it is Ok to refrigerate? The main recipe I've been using as a base calls for removing it, shocking it and then removing the liquids for sauce before deep frying -- would it be ok to shock, refrigerate for several hours, then bring to temperature in the bath again before proceeding with browning/bringing to temp? If this isn't a bad idea, how long would you keep in the water bath after refrigeration? Deep frying vs. a quick hot oven? I'll rub baking soda on this, and I'll fry if need be -- but does anyone have experience or thoughts on whether you'd be defeating the purpose of using sous vide in the first place if you just used a suitably hot oven to crisp the skin after cooking sous vide and drying the skin beforehand? I'd prefer not to to do an inside stove top fry for something this large right before dinner if it wasn't sacrificing too much. Thanks for any help, would also be great to hear any other useful advice from anyone that's went through a similar process. Gary
  11. I usually cook topside beef joints at about 55 degrees for 6 hours, and that gives me a nice even pink and tasty joint. I'm quite interested in trying a very slow cook, like 24 hours maybe, but researching this online, the resulting guidelines just seem to recommend these long cooking times for tougher cuts of meat. Has anyone tried this long a cook on a low heat with joints like topside? Are there any online recommendations for this kind of thing? Thank you kindly
  12. Sous vide fish - issues

    When do you start counting the time in sous vide cooking? - when you first put the plastic bag into the heated water? Or, - when the heated water comes back to the desired temperature? I have a 7 quart slow cooker with an Auber instruments controller. There is nothing to circulate the water, but it has never proved to be a problem for me before. Sous vide fish is a new activity for me. After much research I planned 119F for 20 minutes, though in future I'll try one degree lower each time. My first experiment was salmon tail and it was the most delightful salmon I have ever eaten. Water heated to 119F. Added marinaded fish in a ziplock-type bag which had been removed from the fridge not long before, and I used the sous vide water to push the air out of the ziplock bag. Temp dropped enormously (but I don't recall exactly) and it took 15-20 minutes to get back up to 119F. Then I cooked for 20 further minutes. Second experiment was salmon tail and it was as boring as I usually find salmon. I took the marinaded fish out of the fridge 1 hour or 1 1/2 hour before it went into the sous vide pot. I used lukewarm water in bowl in sink to remove air from ziplock. When the fish was dropped in, the temp dropped to 113F. I was not as anxious watching the temp rise this time, so I didn't check it every few minutes. Somehow the water got up to 124F. In both these cases I used a soup bowl in the sous vide pot to hold the fish under water. So, short of buying some new sous vide equipment, could you advise me about things I could do to minimize the temperature drop and maximize my control over the fish.
  13. This is the first i have heard of this new piece of equipment, but I still can't find out what makes it better than Anova. It looks very similar. Does anyone else know? It's called Joule. http://blog.chefsteps.com/tag/joule/ ETA It doesn't look like it needs a clip. Does it attach to the base of the pot?
  14. Sous vide for a newbie?

    Single household, but I can't hold out any longer.I want one. I've read the threads, but now there are so many variations and brands, and newer ones every day, I'm boggled. What's the best budget price for one that works? No point in buying something substandard. Complete unit, or just the immersion thingy? Help?? whimper ,whimper
  15. Sous Vide Beets

    I have been playing around with beets sous vide. I have seen a lot of different times for them ranging from 45 mins at185 f or 85 C I have increased the temp to 188 F and held for one hour dropped it to 187 F for another hour and finished it at 185 F for the last hour and still they are a little too al dente for most peoples taste. This is way beyond the 45 mins I have seen posted for most recipes. I have peeled and cut the beets into 1/2 inch cubes, heated water on top of the stove and plunged the bags into them before submersing them into the bath and started the original temp in the circulator to about 196 F to adjust for the temp loss when dropping the units in. Not overfilling the bags, maybe some more than one layer, liquid in bags at about one third volume and still no great results. I usually braise them in a oven, covered in cold liquid for about 3 hours whole beets and they come out tender. Any suggestions? Thank you
  16. This year i decided to take a 22lb turkey and remove the Leg quarters and sous vide @165F for 6 hours. I also removed the turkey crown and sous vide it @ 150F for 4 hours. Both were immediately ice chilled and put into the fridge. The plan is to reheat back in the sous vide @ 135F and right before serving time, deep fry in the turkey fryer for a few minutes to crisp up the skins. I just am just not sure the time needed to bring this pretty large whole deboned (3-4 inch at the thickest spot) turkey breast up to temp. The leg portion is about the same thickness maybe slightly thinner. Given there is 4 hours till serving time, I am wondering what effect 135F would have if left in for 4 hours? I am looking for traditional textures. Relatives will not eat if any hint of pink. Anyway, 1,2,3,4 hours @ 135F from 38F already pre cooked. 3-4 inches thick. thanks
  17. The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
  18. Addelice Sous Vide immersion circulator

    Hi! Has anyone tried this immersion circulator from Addelice? http://www.addelice.com/shop/default/cuisson-sous-vide-basse-temperature/einhangethermostat.html I live in Sweden so the price of this circulator is far better than the Polyscience one.
  19. So I've got a couple packets of Activa-brand Transglutaminase. This stuff is quite the hot commodity for molecularly inspired home cooks, so I want to try do some cool experiments with it. I would love to hear from ANYONE who has experience with the product. As of right now, I'm just planning on sprinkling it on this and that, hoping for some sort of magical meat glue creation. If anyone knows the best way to apply this stuff (in terms of technique and applications), it would really help me out. So far I've created a steak-cum-shrimp deal in which I sliced in half (length-wise) a random sirloin I had lying around, and added a layer of thinly sliced shrimp (which also happend to be lying around). After sprinkling some TG here and there, wrapping in plastic, and refrigerating overnight, I had a somewhat stuck together mass of beef and shellfish. I apologize for not taking pictures, but after grilling the amalgamation it was a rather humble looking specimen. I also ventured to Home Depot today in an attempt to create an "extruder" analagous to what Wylie used on Iron Chef America to make his tilapia noodles. This was a strange experience in which I got a lot of very strange looks from sales associates when explaining my idea and accompanying diagram. As a result, I'm currently the proud owner of a random section of pvc pipe, an ill-fitting pvc pipe cap, and a wooden dowel. I think I can make something to extrude noodles from this, but if anyone has any ideas as to how to create the TG-infused shrimp/tilapia/protein noodles, it would be great to know. I've heard something about 1% TG by weight, but that could all be a lie. So as you can tell, I need the help. Ideas, stories, anything. Please.
  20. I've just cooked two lamb shanks sous vide for 72 hours at 141F in separate bags. When I opened the first bag, the shank looked and smelled great. The second bag, however, smelled bad (to me). The shank was covered in gelatinous red stuff. My husband is less smell-impaired than I, so he ate that one. The two shanks were purchased from the meat market associated with the Department of Animal Sciences at the local university where the students will have butchered the animals. I'm wondering if what's possible is that one of the shanks did not have all the blood drained out. And that the smell which I've associated with "bad" is actually the smell of blood.
  21. Sous Vide Chuck Roast: The Topic

    Perusing sous vide threads and blog entries here at eG and elsewhere, one is quick to note that chuck roast (also referred to as chuck steak) is usually one of the first cuts of beef prepared by the owner of a new SV rig. No wonder; its fat content and connective tissue makes for a tasty cut! Please feel free to add notes and results from previous cooks, and tips or suggestions for future preparations.
  22. I know there was a thread on this a few years ago, however it seems these scales are no longer made or newer better models are available. As I've become more serious about my baking, I've decided to get a kitchen scale. I'm debating between the My Weigh KD-8000 http://www.amazon.com/My-Weigh-Digital-Weighing-Scale/dp/B001NE0FU2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297958394&sr=8-1 or the EatSmart Precision Pro Digital Scale. http://www.amazon.com/EatSmart-Precision-Digital-Kitchen-Scale/dp/B001N0D7GA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1297958443&sr=1-1 Originally I wanted the Taylor Salter High Capacity Scale because it looked cool, but I've noticed it received many mixed reviews. http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-Salter-Aquatronics-Capacity-Kitchen/dp/B004BIOMGU/ref=sr_1_24?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1297958465&sr=1-24 Here are my requirments: -Minimum capacity of 11 lbs -Minimum resolution of 1 g -Measure in Kg, lb, oz, g -Tare feature -Preferably have seamless buttons I want to get a nice scale. I don't want to get a scale with minimum features only to find in two years that I do enough baking/cooking that requires me to have something more sophisticated. Here are a few other questions: 1. How important is it to have a scale measure fluid ounces? 2. What about measuring lbs. oz (for example 6 lbs and 4.2 ounces) 3. Is it important to have a scale measure in bakers %? I'd like to learn how to do these and have a cookbook that shows them next to the measurements. I'm not sure if this is something most people can figure out on their own or it would be handy to have them on a scale. The MW KD-8000 does this. The only problem with the MW-KD-8000 is it appears to be big and bulky and I don't have a lot of counter space so I'd probably keep it stored most of the time. The Eat Smart just seems to minimal. The Salter seems like an expensive scale for what it offers and somewhat of a risk. Thanks for any help in helping me choose the right scale. I do not know why this is becoming a chore to purchase! I just want to make sure I choose the right one right off the bat.
  23. I got a Takaje vacuum sealer as a Christmas present; I think this might be the machine you are looking for. http://www.takaje.it/?page_id=88 It comes with valves, which can be applied to jar lids, and the machine has an attachment for sucking the air out of the jars. They are also selling bottle plugs, and vacuum boxes, but I have no experience about those (yet). It works very well, tough I have only been using if for a couple of weeks. Hosting Team Note: See this extensive topic for discussion on the subject prior to 2011
  24. Mint spheres

    I want to make mint spheres for use in a hot sauce. (Think lamb with mint caviar.) Can this be done? Is it possible to make heat-stable spheres? What is the most effective way to extract mint flavour from the raw leaves? I don't want the resulting spheres to contain alcohol as it will be served to children. My cursory investigations indicate that glycerol may be an alternative—has anyone done this?
  25. Another take on constant temperature cooking: http://www.kitchenaid.com/shop/-[KSM1CBL]-408088/KSM1CBL/# Thanks to Kerry, who posted the picture from France, I now have one of these things on order. From what I have read the temperature control is not precise enough for sous vide cookery, however it should be more than acceptable for, say, ice cream. I understand the temperature setting is in two degree increments Fahrenheit. The Precise Heat Mixing Bowl has an adjustment range from 70 to 222 deg F (21 to 105.5 deg C). The unit may be used as a standalone slow cooker (or I guess not so slow), as well as being used as a mixing bowl with certain model KitchenAid stand mixers. I really hope the bowl fits my KitchenAid KSM5OP. It may be an excuse to get the KSM5OP out of the living room.