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Found 1,336 results

  1. The previous section of the ongoing Chamber Vacuum Sealers discussion reached the 20-page mark (after which point topics cause the site to slow significantly whenever they load), so we've split the discussion, which continues, here.
  2. GE is entering the SV field in an innovative way. They are doing a crowdfunding approach through one of their Innovation technology centers. The device itself is also innovative in that it uses a Inductive cooktop for the heating element with a wireless temperature sensor. It's also unique in that it does not include any type of water circulation. Here's a link to the crowdfunding site: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/paragon-induction-cooktop/ What does everybody think about this entry into the field? If nothing else it certainly shows that SV has gotten the attention of major appliance makers. A few weeks ago GE also announced that one of their new lines of stoves will have the same type of temperature control as this device uses so you can do SV on your stovetop.
  3. HOST'S NOTE: This post and those that follow were split off from the pre-release discussion of Modernist Bread. ***** Figured I don't need to dump all this into the contest thread - so I'll post here. My journey to making my first MC loaf. Her's the poolish after >12 hours: Not pictured - water with yeast in it below the bread flour and poolish That went into the mixer and not long later I had a shaggy mass: That rested for a while - then mixed until medium gluten formation - a window pane that was both opaque and translucent (no picture for that slightly messy part) Folded and rested, folded and rested, I think this is 1/2 the mass now ready to rest one final time. Proofed it in the oven - I have a picture of that but it's just foggy window oven Then it went into the oven, here it is at max temp - 450 with steam turned on. Completed loaf: \ And the crumb - this is awesome bread:
  4. Host's note: this delicious topic is continued from What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 2) Duck breast, 57C for 90 min, pre and post sous-vide sear. So the texture was not significantly different from what I get with my usual technique, which is grilling over charcoal. But it's more uniformly pink, and there are no slightly overdone spots. I am pleased with the results even though searing in the house means a ton of smoke and duck fat everywhere! (I did it on the stove in a cast iron skillet, next time I will place the skillet in the oven)
  5. I'm used to cooking pork butt sous vide, but I've just purchased a pork roast. Usually I cook at 140 F for three or four days. Should I change the time/temp for a regular pork roast?
  6. I was reminded the other day of the egg-in-plastic-wrap-poach method.
  7. I made the Creme Anglaise recipe from Myhrvold Modernist Cuisine - it did look curdled and lumpy coming out of the zip lock bag as described in the recipe. I used my stick blender to smooth it out as instructed, but I think I blended it for too long, and it went from lumpy to smooth to watery. Did I make a fatal mistake of over blending the custard? The recipe does not say how to blend or when to stop. Hoping one of the gurus can give me guidance before I try this again. Many Thanks Luke
  8. I noticed there's no meat grinder in the Modernist Gear Guide, so I was curious, what does everyone use? I'm using a Kitchenaid Attachment, and while it sort of does the job, I'm not entirelty please with it and I wondered if anyone had any recommandations. Thanks! Ben
  9. [Host's note: this topic forms part of an extended discussion that grew too big for our servers to handle efficiently. The discussion continues from here.] I am thinking about an Anova for a slightly different purpose. Can I use this in a home brewing environment to manage the grain mash temperature? Maybe I can use this for a HERMS brewing setup? I would use the Anova to maintain the temperature of a hot water tank. I would then use my pump to circulate the wort from the mash tun through a heat exchanger (copper coil) that is immersed in the hot water tank. Thanks. Dan
  10. Has anyone used Valrhona Absolut Crystal neutral glaze particularly to thicken a coulis or to glaze a tart? If so, how did you like it and is there another glaze you think worked as well but is less expensive or can be purchased in smaller quantities?
  11. This is the first i have heard of this new piece of equipment, but I still can't find out what makes it better than Anova. It looks very similar. Does anyone else know? It's called Joule. http://blog.chefsteps.com/tag/joule/ ETA It doesn't look like it needs a clip. Does it attach to the base of the pot?
  12. Hello. I would like to buy some pectinex ultra sp-l. However I am worried about the temperature during the shipping time. I read that the storage temperature should be between 2 and 8 C. It works best from 15 to 50 C, and if it stays a lot of time in 25 C, it will gradually be deactivated. It needs a week to come here (Greece), then will it affect its abilities? Do you know if I can find a document somewhere that explains the gradual loss of power as a function of time and temperature? Did you have any experience with pectinex not working well due to bad storage? Thanks.
  13. Hello, folks, thanks for reading. My husband thinks, I should start selling my popcorn seasonings (which I make for my family), it’s a good product. But I'm not sure if it’s interesting to other people... So, what do you think, guys? Our story: We’ve bought an air popper machine, but popcorn came out pretty tasteless. Then, we’ve bought different “popcorn seasoning” mixes... But it always ends with all the seasoning at the bottom of the bowl. Then, we've added butter, oil and so on before seasoning... we got soggy, chewy popcorn. Lot’s of disappointments… When we almost gave up… the magic happened! I figured out the way to make seasonings that: Stick to popcorn, but not sticky to fingers (or T-shirt , Easy to apply, May be pre cooked in bulk and stored… And popcorn appears crunchy, tasty, thoroughly covered with seasoning. Sounds good, yep? Now, when I want to treat myself - I only need 2 mins to turn tasteless popped popcorn to a real treat. The only moment - it request 1 extra effort: after you toss it over popcorn, you need to microwave it for 1 min, and stir after. So, I was wondering, if you like popcorn like myself - would this seasoning be interesting for you to purchase? Are you ready for a little extra work (microwave & stir) in the goal to flavor popcorn, or it feels too much effort? As I have no experience in manufacturing and retail, your answers would help me to make a very important decision - to dive in or not... Thanks in advance for your answers, it means the world to me.
  14. I know there was a thread on this a few years ago, however it seems these scales are no longer made or newer better models are available. As I've become more serious about my baking, I've decided to get a kitchen scale. I'm debating between the My Weigh KD-8000 http://www.amazon.com/My-Weigh-Digital-Weighing-Scale/dp/B001NE0FU2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297958394&sr=8-1 or the EatSmart Precision Pro Digital Scale. http://www.amazon.com/EatSmart-Precision-Digital-Kitchen-Scale/dp/B001N0D7GA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1297958443&sr=1-1 Originally I wanted the Taylor Salter High Capacity Scale because it looked cool, but I've noticed it received many mixed reviews. http://www.amazon.com/Taylor-Salter-Aquatronics-Capacity-Kitchen/dp/B004BIOMGU/ref=sr_1_24?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1297958465&sr=1-24 Here are my requirments: -Minimum capacity of 11 lbs -Minimum resolution of 1 g -Measure in Kg, lb, oz, g -Tare feature -Preferably have seamless buttons I want to get a nice scale. I don't want to get a scale with minimum features only to find in two years that I do enough baking/cooking that requires me to have something more sophisticated. Here are a few other questions: 1. How important is it to have a scale measure fluid ounces? 2. What about measuring lbs. oz (for example 6 lbs and 4.2 ounces) 3. Is it important to have a scale measure in bakers %? I'd like to learn how to do these and have a cookbook that shows them next to the measurements. I'm not sure if this is something most people can figure out on their own or it would be handy to have them on a scale. The MW KD-8000 does this. The only problem with the MW-KD-8000 is it appears to be big and bulky and I don't have a lot of counter space so I'd probably keep it stored most of the time. The Eat Smart just seems to minimal. The Salter seems like an expensive scale for what it offers and somewhat of a risk. Thanks for any help in helping me choose the right scale. I do not know why this is becoming a chore to purchase! I just want to make sure I choose the right one right off the bat.
  15. I'd like help from anyone on making the best Pistachio Ice cream. This forum is a continuation of a conversation I started in my "introduction" post, which you can see at I recently made Pistachio ice cream using the Jeni's Ice Cream Cookbook. I love Pistachio ice cream, so I've launched an experiment to find the best recipe. I am going to try two basic approaches: The Modernist Cookbook gelato, which uses no cream at all, and ice cream; I'm also experimenting with two brands of pistachio paste and starting with pistachios and no paste. Lisa Shock and other People who commented on the earlier thread said that the key is to start with the best Pistachio Paste.   Any advice is appreciated. Here is where I am now: I purchased a brand of pistachio paste through nuts.com named "Love 'n Bake." When it arrived, it was 1/2 pistachios and 1/2 sugar and olive oil. I purchased a second batch through Amazon from FiddleyFarms; it is 100% pistachios. I bought raw pistachios through nuts.com. The only raw ones were from California. If anyone has advice on using the MC recipe or on best approaches to ice cream with this ingredient I'd appreciate them. I will report progress on my experiment in this forum.
  16. The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
  17. For those of you (like myself) without a copy of Modernist Cuisine, the Vacuum Concentration rig can be seen on this page. I have successfully eBay-ed myself into a functioning vacuum concentration setup. Hopefully this thread will not only serve as a chronicle of the various successes and failures I have with the technique, but as a place where others can do the same. If I end up being the only one (dumb enough) to play around with this setup, at least everyone can pitch ideas for what to concentrate next. I know there are a few people here who played around with rotovaps. I don't have the ability to capture solutes, but this idea for this thread is more to discuss the actual products of vacuum concentration, rather than the strengths or weaknesses of the technique (I think that would go in the Kitchen Consumer forum anyhow). First attempt: Concentrated Clarified Orange Juice This idea stemmed from Dave Arnold's agar clarification technique, which I was moderately successful with. The end product had a very mellowed-out orange flavor, and I thought vacuum concentration would be perfect for getting that kick back in it. This attempt was rushed, so I don't have as much data to provide, but the next project (Jack Daniels) was done in a more controlled, recorded manner. 500g of Clarified OJ for ~75 minutes yielded ~160g of clear amber syrup. Vacuum Concentration in action - https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/ZJLGs3YJQbpAV0aV5MAb (sorry for the huge pic, I'll resize future images) End product - https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/mtDDhDrQD21ZYFQrmtek The sauce was very orangey, with a fair bit of bitterness (though not unpleasant) from the citrus. I'm going to try adding it to sparkling wine for a less-diluted mimosa. I don't have many orange recipes, so it'll probably spoil before I use it for something else. I'm reducing a bottle of Jack Daniels right now. I'll post results tomorrow.
  18. Sorry if this issue has been posted before—in spite of help, I don't manage searching past posts well. I have a shrink-wrapped package of corned beef which came with spices included by the manufacturer. Would you remove this plastic and replace with new vacuum-sealed plastic (without spices) to sous vide the corned beef? Thanks in advance.
  19. I am looking at building a drying chamber for cured meats. It would have basic humidity and temperature control. I had a question about the environment inside the chamber as I am trying to figure out what controls I feel like building. Is there ever a time that the humidity would have to be raised? My assumption is that once the chamber is sealed, and a closed system is formed, thehumiditywould rise above the desired 70-90%RH, and it would only have to be controlled in a downward direction. Does anyone know if this is a correct assumption? It would save me having to build a water injection system. I will make sure to do a build log and code for anyone who is interested. Thank you, Joshua
  20. I got a Takaje vacuum sealer as a Christmas present; I think this might be the machine you are looking for. http://www.takaje.it/?page_id=88 It comes with valves, which can be applied to jar lids, and the machine has an attachment for sucking the air out of the jars. They are also selling bottle plugs, and vacuum boxes, but I have no experience about those (yet). It works very well, tough I have only been using if for a couple of weeks. Hosting Team Note: See this extensive topic for discussion on the subject prior to 2011
  21. Is there any recipe from the modernist universe or any other galaxy to make ketogenic (low carb) puff pastry and strudel type doughs? Unusual ingredients OK. There must be a way...
  22. I got to thinking after the disgusting job of separating globs of fat from sous vide short ribs and debating never doing them that way again. If the fat renders out in a braise, but not in the sous vide, what temperature would you need to turn the fat liquid to get rid of it? Is it below well-done or do you really have to cook the shit out of it? Is it just temperature or a time&temperature thing? Along those lines, what happens with marbled, tender cuts? where is the sweet spot between solid fat and something more palatable?
  23. The cooking with Modernist Cuisine at Home topic seems to have mostly run its course as many of us have had the book for quite a while. One thing I like a lot about the book is that it presents ideas for variations along with the recipes and presents many variations of ways of achieving similar results. So my motivation for this topic is to have a place to talk about our experiments in modifying the recipes - successful or not. You see I have difficulty following instructions... To start, is serendipity with this post in the sous vide thread asking about using bag juice that came out right as I finished up an experiment with the red wine glaze. The experiment was motivated by a mistake where I made SV short ribs at too high a temperature a while back. The meat was not very good but juice was wonderful. So instead of frying up a bunch of ground beef, I took a half kilo of relatively lean stewing beef and bunged it in the SV at 88 C for an hour. At the end of that time the meat was dry and the bag full of meat juice. The juice was very clear and light in colour with little in the way of 'gunk'. I added it to the wine and veg, started reducing, then strained the veg out and reduced the rest of the way. I skipped pressure cooking the knucklebones (I'm not sure why the recipe has you reduce the wine, then add water to pressure cook the bones, why not cook the bones in the wine then reduce?) To cut to the chase, I was quite happy with the result. I don't agree with the 'fat is flavour' mantra and the only fat in this was the little that rendered out of the meat in the SV. I might try adding a little gelatin for mouth feel and to make the glaze with less reduction. ... and the dog was happy with the dried out meat for his tea-time.
  24. TdeV

    Salt & sous vide

    I'm thinking that one isn't supposed to add salt to meat which is about to be sous-vided. I have no idea from whence the idea came, nor whether it's correct. Also I'm thinking that raw onion is ok in the sous vide bag, but not raw garlic (because it imparts a harsh flavour). Either of these impressions have value?
  25. In Douglas Baldwin's book he states to cook at 135F for 75 minutes. My questions are: 1. Does this change the consistency of the eggs? 2. Would I still be able to use them to make eggnog or in a shake? 3. How long can you keep them in the refrigerator?
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