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Found 683 results

  1. Ankarsrum, the Swedish mixer of many names: Electrolux Assistent, DLX, Verona, Magic Mill... I understand a few eGullet folks have these, or have had. Mine came this afternoon. From what I've read, mixing procedure with the Ankarsrum is different from mixing with planetary stand mixers. At the moment I need advice specifically with whether I should use the dough hook (with or without the scraper arm) or the roller attachment for my bread. The Ankarsrum manual says to use the dough hook for dough with between 1 and 1.5 liters of liquid ingredients. OK. My usual dough recipe uses 410 g of water. Rose Levy Beranbaum in The Bread Bible says to use the dough hook when mixing less than 4 pounds of dough. Which if my math is correct is about 750 g of water (math is not my thing). Beranbaum adds "For larger amounts, use the roller and scraper." Yet most bread recipes in the Ankarsrum recipe booklet that call for the dough hook use about a liter of liquid. The recipes that call for the roller use less liquid, 400-600 ml. Beranbaum is usually right but I'm wondering if she's wrong? Thoughts or suggestions? P.S. Sparkling Gold was not my first color choice. Sparkling Gold was perhaps not my thirteenth color choice. But Sparkling Gold was 10 percent off. Besides, the gold color matches the gold lettering on the bowl and dials. Now I feel better.
  2. (Note: This topic was split from the Monkey Bread topic, to keep both discussions focused and relevant to the question at hand.) I made inverse puff pastry last week for "chasson aux pommes" (apple turnovers). Never made puff pastry before. Beginner's luck, turned out beyond expectations, super layers, butter, crisp exterior, tender honeycomb inerior (even without yeast!!), lightly sweet, slightly tart, it took every bit of will power not to eat them before taking them to work. Based on all the suggestions, I saved the scraps, and additionally separated them by size and shape. Seems like I can make something called "monkey bread", but I have no clue what that actually is. I've researched it, and it seems I should just bunch it up with sugar and bake... but these aren't yeasted, sooooo wouldn't bunching these up screw up the layers and make more of a pie dough squishy thing? Reading the forums, with puff pastry I can make little cookies or crackers or other things. But I'm not quite sure how to do this? They are kind of small to twist into sticks or roll into arlettes? Help please and thank you??? 🤝 For now, I've put scraps in the freezer.
  3. I want to make a gingerbread dessert for Christmas dinner. I don't want cookies of people. I don't want a house. What I want is a gingerbread that is like a sheet cake. The bread part seems pretty easy. Looks like it can be made like a quick bread. Cook's Illustrated has a recipe in my copy of 'Baking Illustrated'. I can use that, but am open to other suggestions. But once I have the cake, how to serve it? I gotta do more than put a slice on a plate. I think I need some sort of sauce. And some sort of "creamy thing". Ice cream? Or maybe just whipped cream? Finally, a garnish of some sort. a sprinkle of chopped, crystalized ginger, maybe?
  4. Blueberry Buckle, Banana Bread, Banana Coffee Bread, Boston Brown Bread and Prune Nut Bread. Cornbread, Corn Fritters and Corn Spoon Bread. Ginger Muffins, Hawaiian Muffins and Swedish Timbale Cases. All these recipes come from my cherished 1968 edition of the Better Homes and Gardens "New Cook Book." But the popularity of "quick breads" hasn’t faded over the decades. By definition, quick breads are basically breads that are leavened with baking soda or baking powder rather than yeast. And "quick" breads eliminate the need for waiting hours for the yeast in traditional doughs to rise. The Holidays are the perfect time for quick breads. Quick breads are economical and all the well-known ingredients of the holiday kitchen work quite well in quick breads: dates, raisins, pumpkin, cranberries, candied fruits, nuts, citrus fruits, eggnog and a boozy nog too. The Holidays are fast approaching, so join in the celebration as we launch our newest Bake-Off, eG Bake-Off XX: Holiday Quick Breads. See our complete Bake-Off Index here: https://forums.egullet.org/topic/155586-bake-off-index/
  5. HOST'S NOTE: This post and those that follow were split off from the pre-release discussion of Modernist Bread. ***** Figured I don't need to dump all this into the contest thread - so I'll post here. My journey to making my first MC loaf. Her's the poolish after >12 hours: Not pictured - water with yeast in it below the bread flour and poolish That went into the mixer and not long later I had a shaggy mass: That rested for a while - then mixed until medium gluten formation - a window pane that was both opaque and translucent (no picture for that slightly messy part) Folded and rested, folded and rested, I think this is 1/2 the mass now ready to rest one final time. Proofed it in the oven - I have a picture of that but it's just foggy window oven Then it went into the oven, here it is at max temp - 450 with steam turned on. Completed loaf: \ And the crumb - this is awesome bread:
  6. Am hoping for some help here. Have found an old Margaret Costa recipe I want to try, but it gives a weight for fresh yeast (something mad sounding like 1 oz - but will double check!). However - I tend to work with those packets of fast action dried yeast you can buy in UK supermakrets - about 7g each - so my question is - how do I convert fresh into dried equivalent? I don't have scales to measure such minute amounts so I guess I'm looking for answers in the form of teaspoon measures perhaps? Or am I being hopelessly optimistic? With grateful thanks Yin
  7. Today we’ve reached a milestone, the 60th edition of one of the most popular discussions that graces our forums—the eGullet Cook-Off Series. (Click http://forums.egulle...m/#entry1581324 here for the complete eG Cook-Off Index). In celebration of reaching Cook-Off #60, we’ll be discussing a sandwich that is a marriage of French and Vietnamese cultures. A sandwich that has crossed international borders and now finds itself on restaurant menus throughout the world. It’s served on fine china at white tablecloth dining rooms and it’s delivered on a paper plate out of a food truck parked in downtown Manhattan. Yes, friends, you’ve guessed the subject of Cook-Off #60-the Banh Mi sandwich, the current king of sandwichdom.
  8. I had an Italian stlye cracker-crispy flatbread at a restaurant called Brio (a chain) a couple weeks ago. It was covered in rosemary, sesame seens, flaxseed, and I think there was some sort of cheese on it very lightly. I went nuts over it, so I have been trying to duplicate the recipe ever since, with mild success. If anyone has tried the same flatbread and has a similar recipe or any cracker recipe that you're really fond of, please post. I really hate bread, but I've started getting into crackers, so I can always use some more recipes. Thanks!
  9. I've had my bread machine for about 2 years and love it - I love how quickly I can add the ingredients and a few hours later, I have a nice smelling house and often tasty loaf of bread. I don't remember buying a loaf of bread in these 2 years! Having followed numerous recipes, I feel I'm ready to get creative and try to devise my own combinations. But I'm scared - scared of wasting vast quantities of ingredients on recipes that fail to rise or are too stodgy. So, having seen the expertise available here, I was wondering if anybody can give me some tips on what ratios to absolutely stick to and how to adjust it for different ingredients - e.g. adding cheese = less oil. I know it's not this simple (and adding cheese probably doesn't = less oil) so I'm here to hear your wisdom and guidance! Apologies if this has been asked before - I couldn't find anything other than an extensive conversation about yeast
  10. So I tried my hand at croissants for the first time in about 5 years. I used the recipe from the Bouchon Bakery cookbook. Despite the fact that I really struggled rolling them out (the dough was very stiff and resisted rolling), tore the dough layer in small patches quite a bit on the last turn, and probably took too long letting the butter get too warm, I got nice layers on the outside and on the interior and they did shatter nicely on the outside. I did not get that beautiful open honeycomb interior, however. I’d love any tips or feedback or advice anyone could offer to do better next time—thanks!
  11. So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter? I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items. My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins). And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production! ;-)
  12. The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
  13. I'm a pastry cook working in NYC. We have a seasonal bread that we do with chickpeas, garlic (fresh and confit) and pecorino. We drain and rinse the chickpeas and it was working for a while but it hasn't been consistent. Bread turns out flat. What is it in chickpeas that kills the yeast and how can we counteract the effect? I'm taking a long shot by posting but wanted to further educate myself and fellow team members. Thanks so much.
  14. I love this book! I've made the recipe for Basic Hearth Bread many times before but now I want to do the "ultimate full flavor variation." I've already let the sponge ferment in the fridge for 24 hours but she says for even more flavor, "refrigerate the finished dough overnight; take it out 1 hour before shaping it." So...does that mean that I mix the dough, let it rise, then refrigerate it overnight, take it out, shape it and let it rise again? I appreciate any advice anyone has
  15. I can make, by my own admission , perfect sourdough, fantastic baguettes, delicious pizza (even approved by native neapolitans) but I cannot, even after multiple tries, make an acceptable focaccia. Mine always ends up overly dry or too oily. I've tried, as advised by some to use a pizza dough but this ends up too thin and crispy. Others end up as simply like a thin slab of bread. What I am looking for is a soft, delicate but slightly chewy bite with lots of open holes. The focaccia should be lightly but perceptibly oily, nicely salty and with a hints of rosemary or oregano in the topping. The focaccia should also have nice rise and be thick not thin like an unadorned pizza base. So come on egulleteers help me out and let's see those attempts for the perfect focaccia recipe!
  16. Dear fellow bakers, We have been baking no-knead bread at home for several years and as a family of scientists and engineers, we consistently tried to make it even more easier and convenient. We liked what we ended up with so much that, I decided to start a small company (based in Eindhoven, Netherlands) to make a new bread kit product out of it. I am seeking your help to know your opinion of the product and how the story is told. LoafNest is an improvement on no-knead Dutch oven bread making. We took perforated silicone liner designed for professional bread baking and put it into a uniquely designed cast iron casserole. With this improvement, there is no need for shaping or second raising of the bread. You just mix, let the dough raise, pre-heat, pour the dough, bake and done! So, LoafNest is a no-knead, no-mess, no-cleanup solution for convenient and practical bread making. The perforated silicone liner is from the same company that makes Silpat mats. Our liner is a more advanced version with perforations that allow radiative, conductive and convective heat to all sides of the bread. It is also rated to a higher temperature (260C/500F) With less than 5 minutes of active work that can fit into a busy schedule, we hope to reduce the entry barrier for people who are willing to make bread. Our primary targets are people who buy expensive premium bread but want to make their own premium bread at home or people who use bread machines and want to eat better bread. While it is not a primary target, we also believe this is a nice solution for experienced bakers who want to use a high-humidity, high thermal mass baking environment. You can find the details and more images on http://trfl.nl/LoafNest [still a little bit work in progress] and http://trfl.nl/loafnest-gallery What are your impressions of the product? Visually and functionally? What are your thoughts on how the story is told? Any improvement to resonate better with people who are thinking of starting to bake their own bread? Any thoughts on pricing? I would be grateful to your feedback and suggestions. I am sure, in the end, we all want more people to eat better and healthier bread. So please support me in this endeavor.
  17. If so, what was it like? Sounds similar to kouign-aman ... https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-44486529
  18. Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
  19. Host's note: this topic was split from the topic Baking Bread from Scratch in France. Allrighty then, I thought I would give this a go. This is what it looks like and I will cover this with a paper towel and see what happens. It is in a west facing window. Not sure what to do with it exactly if it works, but I will deal with that when (if) the time comes.
  20. Hi all-- I seem to find myself with this dilemna fairly often when I make cornbread with supper. It tastes great but our family can't eat all of it but the next day it is too dry and crumbly. I hate to throw things out, especially if they originally tasted great, so I'm looking for ways to reuse the leftovers. Or, does anyone have a good technique for reheating cornbread so that it is not too dry? What do you do with leftover cornbread?
  21. FYI. On todays Food Programme, BBC Radio 4 which will be podcasted I think tomorrow after its repeat. He outlined the Bread tome, and I found very interesting the economics of bread. It's all a bit beyond me as a Coeliac most of it is out of my reach. One can listen to it on Radio 4 website. Furthermore R4 is my constant companion and the last bastion of civilisation
  22. Just got his Handmade Loaf and am enjoying reading for now. I decided to start with his crusty potato bread but am wondering whether this particular formula would function well in the refrigerator overnight and then kneading and so forth as is noted the next day. It's the addition of the potatos and refrigerating I'm worried about in particular. I don't know whether anything (flavor, texture, rise, etc) will be compromised if I mix the night before and then knead, divide, shape and bake the next day.
  23. Anyone know where in Vancouver we can find something similar to the Calebaut chocolate loaf we get that Rhys Pender & Alishan Driediger make at Okanagan Grocery in Kelowna?? http://www.okanagangrocery.com/index_files/page0007.htm We will be staying at our condo in Yaletown for two weeks starting this weekend and I think we might have withdrawal symptoms if we don't have chocolate bread for that long!!! This bread is highly addicitve, and it is nothing like pain au chocolat that you see in most bakeries. There are chunks of dark chocolate throughout, and the bread dough is also chocolate.
  24. I am trying to compose a special food gift for my folks, and I wanted to buy a loaf of Poilane bread - yes, it's extravagant - from their site. I placed an order, but was never asked for a cc#. I have serious doubts about this. Anyone ever placed an order with them?
  25. Years and years ago I lived up the block and across the street from a large country store on the outskirts of a college town that sold incredible cheesecakes, Archie comic books for the devout and everything you could possibly need for baking for cheap: all in clear plastic bags sealed with twist ties, weighed and priced. There and then I first noticed different kinds of powdered milk sold next to yeast, wheat berries and rye flour. These were the days that the popularity of Diet for a Small Planet was just beginning to wane and I always associated dehydrated milk with that kind of economical, fringe cooking. Having somehow misplaced my favorite source of simple, basic bread recipes, I opened up Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone (1997; sorry, no time to tend a poolish) and was surprised to see that Deborah Madison recommends the use of dry milk or dried buttermilk in several of her bread recipes. Since there are only a few recipes, it is hard to see a pattern. However, in one case, the recipe is for a whole wheat bread that includes a little gluten flour, but no unbleached white; another is for a rye bread. Does powdered milk complement heartier flours in a way that distinguishes it from fresh milk or buttermilk? Or might it be an established, superior source of protein for vegetarians? Edited to ask: Do I need to make any adjustments in simply replacing some of the water in the recipe with milk--other than, perhaps, increasing the amount of flour slightly?
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