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Found 664 results

  1. GF flours - why so gritty?

    I was cooking for a party last night at which a gluten free cake was served for dessert. I had a few bites and aside from the cake being dry and the frosting very sweet, there was that tell-tale grittiness that GF baked goods seem to have. This particular bakery uses a blend of millet, sorghum, tapioca and potato flours. I used some Bob's Red Mill GF flour to satisfy a customer request for GF shortbread and found the same grittiness - they use garbanzo bean flour, potato starch, whole grain white sorghum flour, tapioca flour and fava bean flour. Obviously some sacrifices of flavor and texture are made when trying to replicate the magic of gluten, but why can't these flour blends be softer? Can't they be milled more finely? Or is it just the way the particular starches or proteins in those other flours are felt on the tongue? It's like that chalky cold cooked rice texture, do you know what I mean? Why can't it be better? Almost every time I eat something made with substitute flours, it makes me sad and want to fix it.
  2. The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
  3. Today I would like to share with you a recipe for a slightly different sandwich. Instead of traditional vegetables, I recommend strawberry salsa, and rather than a slice of ham – a golden grilled slice of Halloumi cheese. Only one thing is missing – a fresh and fragrant bread roll. Halloumi is a Cypriot cheese made with sheep's milk or a mixture of sheep's, goat's and cow's milk. It is semihard and so flexible that it is excellent for frying and barbecuing, and it is great fresh too. Ingredients (for two people) 2 fresh rolls of your choice 2 big lettuce leaves 4 slices of Halloumi cheese 2 teaspoons of butter salsa: 8 strawberries half a chili pepper 2 tablespoons of minced peppermint leaves ¼ a red onion 2 tablespoons of chopped almond without the skin 1 teaspoon of honey 2 tablespoons of lemon juice 2 tablespoons of balsamic sauce Start by preparing the salsa. Wash the strawberries, remove the shanks and cube them. Dice the onion and chili pepper. Mix the strawberries with the onion, chili pepper, peppermint and almonds. Spice it up with honey and lemon juice. Leave in the fridge for half an hour. Grill the slices of Halloumi cheese until they are golden. Cut the fresh rolls in half and spread them with butter. Put a lettuce leaf on each half of roll, then a slice of the Halloumi cheese, one tablespoon of salsa, another slice of cheese and two tablespoons of salsa. Spice it up with balsamic sauce. Cover with the other half of the roll. Prepare the second sandwich in the same way. Serve at once while the cheese is still hot. Enjoy your meal!
  4. Gluten-Free Bread

    We're working on gluten free breads to satisfy growing requests for GF products. We've developed good tasting recipes for white, rosemary, and multigrain. The problem we're having has to do with the dryness of the crumb (it almost powders in the mouth). We add about 1TBS veg oil for each loaf, but that doesn't seem to help. All the recipes have either whole eggs or egg whites, and butter. Our dough base is sorghum flour, potato starch, and tapioca flour, with a small proportion of Expandex. Any thoughts on how we might be able to add and retain moisture in the crumb for a better mouth feel? Cheers, Steve
  5. Host's note: this topic was split from the topic Baking Bread from Scratch in France. Allrighty then, I thought I would give this a go. This is what it looks like and I will cover this with a paper towel and see what happens. It is in a west facing window. Not sure what to do with it exactly if it works, but I will deal with that when (if) the time comes.
  6. Having no local Arabic bakery, I have long hoped to learn to make good khoubz at home. Every time I try, however, my bread is too stiff and tough. I have been successfully making other breads using The Bread Baker's Apprentice, and now wonder if my bread woule benefit from an overnight ferment in the refrigerator. FoodMan (and anyone) can you help me?
  7. Not sure if the subject line really reflects the situation and my question. Sweetie made a couple of loaves of soda bread the other day, and cut the top of the loaf in order to make a pattern something like THIS. However, the pattern or cut mark didn't show on the finished loaf. I don't know much more other than she said she made the cut "pretty deep." What might be the cause of the cut mark not showing on the finished loaf? Thanks!
  8. Favorite Quick Breads?

    Well I found myself(at 10:00 at night) deciding to make a big batch of scones and then I will give most away tomorrow morning...I am a big scone fan but was wondering..... What is everyone's favorite quick bread for whatever time of day or meal? Look forward to hearing everyone's favorites...
  9. How to Make Rye Sourdough Bread I don't know what it is about bread, but it is my favorite thing to make and eat. A freshly baked loaf of bread solves a world of problems. I was lucky enough to get to be one of the main bakers when I worked at the Herbfarm. We baked Epi, Baguettes, Rolls, Pretzels and so much more. Rye Sourdough Wood Oven Baked Bread My fondest memory when I worked there was our field trip to the Bread Lab(wait something this cool came out of WSU, of course!) here in Washington. They grow thousands of varieties of wheat and have some pretty cool equipment to test gluten levels, protein, genetics and so on. I nerded out so hard. What came out of that trip was this bread. Now I can't recall the exact flour we got from them, but using a basic bread and rye will do the trick. We used to get a special flour for our 100 mile menu. This was where we were limited to only serving food from 100 miles away. So finding a wheat farm that made actual hulled wheat in 100 miles was a miracle. The year before...the thing we made, was closer to hard tack. Now if you don't have a starter, I recommend starting one! It is a great investment! Rye Sourdough 1000 g flour (60% Bread Flour, 40% Rye) 25 g salt 75 g of honey/molasses 200 g of Rye starter 650 g of water, cold Equipment Baker Scale (or other gram scale) Bench Cutter Bread Razor (you could also use one of those straight razors) Start by taking the cold water, yeast and Honey and mix together and let sit for 10-15 minutes I know, some of you just freaked out, cold water? Won't that kill the yeast. Nope, the yeast just needs to re hydrate. I prefer using cold water to slow the yeast down. That way the lactobacillus in the starter has a good amount of time to start making lactic acid, and really get to flavor town! While that is sitting, I mix the flour and the salt together(How many times I have forgotten to salt the bread). Now mix the two products with a kneading hook for 3-5 minutes, only until thoroughly mixed but not yet at the window pane stage of kneading. Instead, place into a bowl and set a timer for one hour. Then when that hour is up, push the dough down and fold all the corners in Repeat this step 2-3 more times, pending on the outside temperature. If you happen to have those cool bowls to shape round loafs! Awesome, use them. I would break the boules into 3 balls of about 333 grams If not then just put the dough in the fridge and do the steps below the next day. Once you have bouled the bread, can put it into the fridge and let it sit over night Again, this lets the bacteria, really get to work(misconception is the yeast adds the sour flavor, nope, think yogurt!) Now on the next day, heat up whatever form of oven you plan to use. We used a brick oven but if you just have a normal oven, that is fine. Crank it to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. If you have not bouled your bread yet, go back and watch the video and break the dough down into three balls of abut 333 grams. Then place the balls on a lightly greased sheet pan. Let sit for about 45 minutes to 1 hour. If you have used the fancy bowls then turn the the bread out on a lightly greased sheet pan, without the bowl and let temper for 15-30 minutes. If your oven is steam injected, build up a good blast of steam. If not, throw in a few ice cubes and close the door or put a bath of hot water inside. The steam is what creates the sexy crust! Let it build up for a few minutes! Right before you put the bread into the oven use a bread razor to slice the top of the bread. Place the dough balls into the oven and douse with another blast of steam or ice and close the oven. Let them bake for 13 minutes at 450 degrees. Then turn the loaves and bake for another 10 minutes. Remove when the crust is as dark as you want and the internal temperature exceeds 190 degrees Fahrenheit. Now pull out and make sure to let cool off of the sheet pan with room to breath underneath. You don't want your crust steaming! Now here is the hardest part, wait at least 20 minutes before getting into the bread. Also, cutting into bread to early really seems to come out poorly. I would rip the bread until 1-2 hours has passed. Now serve it with your favorite butter, goat butter or whipped duck fat!
  10. Catherine T

    Hi, I have just discovered and registered on this site. My main cooking and baking concern is that I have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease and haven't been able to eat gluten. BUT I have discovered an exception. When I have visited Continental Europe such as Spain and Russia, I have been able to eat their bread and have had no negative repercussions. Then when I try eating bread in Great Britain and North America I have become sick. My research on the Web has not provided any explanations although I believe the EU has banned GMO grains. I was recently gifted panetonne from a Toronto restaurant called Sud Forno that uses Italian flour and I was able to safely eat it. Another bakery called Forno Cultura advertises that it uses European flour. So I am going to approach them to see if I can buy their flour in bulk. I will let you know how it goes.
  11. San Diego Bakeries

    San Diego has a small number of artisanal bread bakeries. Bread & Cie has been my favorite for years, and their breads are now available in many supermarkets, which is very convenient. But it's nice to have some variety. So I was excited to spot a new bakery this weekend in Linda Vista. It's called Pacific Time and it is also a sandwich place with a small market with things like small-batch preserves, local beers, a cheese counter, charcuterie platters, and wine. It's located within a recently renovated strip mall that also hosts Brew Mart & Ballast Point. The bread I bought was a French-type rustic boule, dark, a bit reminiscent of Poilane but less dense. The crust could have been a little more crispy (it felt like the bread had sat around a little bit and softened in the paper bag), but the flavor was wonderful. Here is the bread:
  12. Hi all, Iam in love with the baguette. But this version that I want to make is a Vietnamese version, that Ive heard uses part rice flour??? The crust is crispy and light. The bread is not at all dense. The vietnamese baguette is supposedly taken from the French Baguettes. Any help is greatly appreciated. -Nhumi
  13. I want to leave my sourdough (itself, not baked loaves of sourdough bread) for a while (going abroad) but I do not want it to die, can I leave it in the freezer? do you have other ideas?
  14. Cornbread [MERGED TOPIC]

    What should a skillet baked Corn Bread taste like? What should it be made with? Is there a near perfect recipe? Where should I go looking for it? What are the essentials for a good Corn Bread?
  15. The folks behind Modernist Cuisine have announced a projected publication date of March 2017 for their new five-volume set on bread (previously discussed here). Start saving up now!
  16. Cook-Off 60: Banh Mi

    Today we’ve reached a milestone, the 60th edition of one of the most popular discussions that graces our forums—the eGullet Cook-Off Series. (Click http://forums.egulle...m/#entry1581324 here for the complete eG Cook-Off Index). In celebration of reaching Cook-Off #60, we’ll be discussing a sandwich that is a marriage of French and Vietnamese cultures. A sandwich that has crossed international borders and now finds itself on restaurant menus throughout the world. It’s served on fine china at white tablecloth dining rooms and it’s delivered on a paper plate out of a food truck parked in downtown Manhattan. Yes, friends, you’ve guessed the subject of Cook-Off #60-the Banh Mi sandwich, the current king of sandwichdom.
  17. Host's note: this topic is continued from The Bread Topic (2009 - 2014) I made white bread from from The Bread Baker's Apprentice by Peter Reinhart. I used variation #1. Best white bread I've ever made.
  18. Gelatin in bread

    Hello all, In attempt to make it easier to work high hydration dough, I had a thought about using gelatin and water in order to make jello cubes, and incorporate them into the kneaded dough. The idea is that unlike extra water, the jello will not have much adverse effect on the dough texture, stickiness and ease of handling. However, when baked, the gelatin will dissolve and allow the water to boil into steam and effectively increase the hydration, resulting in more aeration, raise and moistness. I tried it once, reducing apx. 7% water from the dough and folding in 7% gel after kneading. However, I mistakenly made too weak of a gel, and it just melted into the dough. Shaping wasn't easier then usual (sticky as always ). The bread did bake as usual, with no ill effects. I think I should try it again, replacing 15% of the water with much stronger jello. I'd like too hear your opinion, am I wasting my time or does it make sense? I thought it might also theoretically work in laminated dough, possibly replacing some of the butter?
  19. Am hoping for some help here. Have found an old Margaret Costa recipe I want to try, but it gives a weight for fresh yeast (something mad sounding like 1 oz - but will double check!). However - I tend to work with those packets of fast action dried yeast you can buy in UK supermakrets - about 7g each - so my question is - how do I convert fresh into dried equivalent? I don't have scales to measure such minute amounts so I guess I'm looking for answers in the form of teaspoon measures perhaps? Or am I being hopelessly optimistic? With grateful thanks Yin
  20. Homemade Crackers

    I had an Italian stlye cracker-crispy flatbread at a restaurant called Brio (a chain) a couple weeks ago. It was covered in rosemary, sesame seens, flaxseed, and I think there was some sort of cheese on it very lightly. I went nuts over it, so I have been trying to duplicate the recipe ever since, with mild success. If anyone has tried the same flatbread and has a similar recipe or any cracker recipe that you're really fond of, please post. I really hate bread, but I've started getting into crackers, so I can always use some more recipes. Thanks!
  21. Pizza nei testi

    Ever seen this cooking technique ? A reference with pictures in italian language. Could'nt find any in english. http://cheprofumino.blogspot.it/2009/02/la-nostra-pizzasenza-forno.html
  22. The team behind Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking is hard at work on their next multivolume set, which is completely dedicated to bread. For the new book, we’d like to honor some of the greatest regional and hyper-regional breads from around the globe and we would love to hear from the eGullet community to expand our search. In your opinion, what are the breads that your city or region is known for? What are the loaves that you can’t find anywhere else? Example: Stretch bread, Syracuse, NY You can read more about the new book here, and here for more information about who we are and what we do.
  23. If you had a choice of one bread baking book (artisinal) which would it be? OK. You can have 2 choices. Thanks, Joe
  24. The team behind Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking is hard at work on their next multivolume set, which is completely dedicated to bread. We’d like to honor some of the greatest bakers and bakeries from around the globe in our new book, and we would love to hear from the eGullet community to expand our search. What are your favorite bakeries for bread? Does the bakery have an iconic bread that they’re known for? Do they use any uncommon ingredients or special techniques to make their bread? Please provide the address of the bakery, name of head baker, and a photo of the bread, if feasible. For example: Country Bread from Tartine in San Francisco, CA – Chad Robertson, baker You can read more about the new book here, and here for more information about who we are and what we do.
  25. Ive been reading numerous articles, blogs, etc where people mention that they use a Romertopf for baking breads, including the no knead bread. I am still a bit confused because there are mixed commentary on whether to soak or not to soak prior to popping the baker into a cold oven. Can anyone who owns a Romertopf and uses it for no knead share your method for no knead and whether you soak it or just preheat? I would like to make an enlongated version of this bread and have made an ok circular bread with my chamba pot. The Romertopf that I own is unglazed and its the medium size that can hold a whole chicken. (111) i think.
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