JoNorvelleWalker

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    New Jersey USA

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  1. All About Rye Whiskey (Part 2)

    'Pends which Whistlepig you're sippin'.
  2. Kitchen Remodel starting now

    I'm sure my experience is not unique! It's enough to drive one to drink. Thankfully once I rested and my arms stopped shaking it did not take long to get the clips in the groves and the door back on. At the moment I am baking bread.
  3. Kitchen Remodel starting now

    I would so love new appliances! Two and a half hours into my stove repair and I had to stop because I couldn't stand and my arms were/are shaking. To get the handle back on, the front panel has to come off. Getting the handle back on the panel was a pain but it was doable. Horribly cheap design, in my opinion, for a major appliance that is supposed to last. Now I am stuck trying to get the front panel back on the hinged part of the door. I know how the assembly is supposed to work: there are two clips in the bottom of the panel that go into matching slots in the door. Then the top of the door is secured to the panel by two screws. At best I've been able to get one clip in at a time, and beating on it with a hammer doesn't help. This was a used stove when the landlord installed it about eighteen years ago after my stove at the time could not be fixed. I got it because a tenant moved out and the landlord put a new stove in to rent that apartment. Knowing the provenance of the stove I believe it is thirty six years old. I never did like it after I got chemical burns because they installed it all covered in lye. Not to mention that it isn't level. On a similar topic, the range hood is secured with one screw. (As is the exhaust fan in the bathroom.) Someday the range hood is going to come down in the soup.
  4. Kitchen Remodel starting now

    Thank you, that brought a smile (and some relief) to my old face.
  5. Dinner 2016 (Part 11)

    I've started in on studying Giuliano Bugialli's Foods of Tuscany. I'm still a little ill and it was a work night, so nothing fancy. Dinner was a bit of Giuseppe Cocco pasta in the last of a tomato sauce -- followed (it would have been proceeded had I planned accordingly) by a plate of my tomatoes from this summer. (Yes, I shall soon have my kitchen counter back!) Provolone and salami. Can't pretend it was very Italian, dressed as it was with Oro Bailen olive oil and Martin Pouret vinegar of Orleans. Let's just say European. Then I read Tuscans don't mix cheese and cured meats. Oh well. And not to forget the last of an excellent baguette. Currently a generous glass of Chartreuse VEP for my health.
  6. Kitchen Remodel starting now

    You don't know how I envy you. The handle of my thirty some year old cheap apartment oven fell off tonight. And not for the first time. Maybe in daylight I can find the parts.
  7. Never again will I set my mai tai down on the edge of the coaster and spill the contents on the keyboard while trying to follow Fat Guy's argument... https://forums.egullet.org/topic/105383-parmigiano-style-cheeses-outside-of-italy/?do=findComment&comment=1463949
  8. Send pictures of your bedroom.
  9. Well, Anna, I am well into the book and except for your post I would have no clue as to Hugh's last name. It is a glimpse into an alien world where gas mark is venerated but no condescension is made to Fahrenheit. Most of these three item recipes would not make it past the six, twelve, or even twenty item checkout lanes at the local supermarket. Which is not to say some of the recipes are not interesting. I have been sticking in bookmarks. Though I must reiterate my hands on experience of British cuisine is bacon in cans from Denmark and custard in packets from Bird's.
  10. What's New in Kitchen Gadgets?

    Last week's issue of The Economist featured a fascinating and exhaustive article on the history of clothespins. Too bad they missed the culinary applications.
  11. What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 2)

    Not my idea of fun at all but at the moment I have seven bags of chicken thighs in the bath. For whatever reason that seems good to them my local store sells thighs only in packages of ten. You want a couple breasts or legs, no problem. But thighs, you are out of luck. On a brighter note, a few weeks from now on some cold, icy evening there will be a thigh or two in the refrigerator.
  12. I caved, except for me the price was $2.13 including tax.
  13. What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 2)

    I notice your anova is different from mine. How much distance of water level do you have between MIN and MAX on yours?
  14. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advance_copy Working in a library we see these all the time. It was possibly illegal for your store to sell it. Libraries are not even allowed to lend them. They are to be given away at no charge.
  15. What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 2)

    I use plastic wrap. But even without the plastic wrap I don't understand how you could be losing so much water overnight. My anova has never shut off prematurely for any reason. Having just gotten up off my comfortable chair to measure, there are three and a half inches (8.89 cm) between the MAX and MIN water levels. That's a lot of evaporation unless you were boiling your bacon. With my ten inch diameter stock pot I would have to evaporate over four and a half liters to cause a shutoff.