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Found 954 results

  1. Hi all, I have been trying to locate the complete Grand Livre de Cuisine series in English. From his French website and my very limited school French I believe he has published 5 titles for the series: 1. "Classic" Cuisine 2. Desserts and Pastries 3. Mediterranean 4. Bistro and Brasserie 5. Contemporary style Apparently volumes 1 and 2 have been published but I have not been able to find any English version for volumes 3 to 5. Dropped an enquiry to Ducasse's website but no response. Does anyone know if we will ever need to go to the French original for the complete series, or will we see an English version some day? Thanks in advance and any help will be much appreciated. Regards,
  2. It's $100.00 with an 8" knife included...although I can't see what brand knife it is. Just wondering if anyone has taken this class and what you thought of it. Feedback? Classes offered
  3. Does anyone know the status of Trotter's new books that were suppose to come out last fall? I believe one was called: "Lessons in Wine Service" and the other was a wholesale re-write of his original cookbook.
  4. I find most cookbooks rather hapazard in this regard, where they don't really explain why they're using specific ingredients. For a recipe with 20 ingredients, I'd like to understand the process of why they needed all 20 ingredients, and how they came up with those specific 20 ingredients. I'd like to know what would happen if I didn't use one of those ingredients, or if I substituted another ingredient. Sometimes, there might be a small blurb with the recipe that mentions that they used a specific ingredient, but then its just so completely random. I guess I'm looking for more of a theory book about this topic, and don't necessairly care about recipes. It would be great if the book started out by laying down its ideas, and then used the recipes to illustrate those concepts. So far, I've found several books that sound like they might help me in this regard: Culinary Artistry by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page The Elements of Taste by Gary Kunz Secret Ingredients: The Magical Process of Combining Flavors by Michael Roberts Kitchen Conversations by Joyce Goldstein Has anybody read these books? I'd like to get some opinions about them before I order them. Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  5. Has anyone used Walter's latest baking book and do you have an opinion on whether it is worth adding to an already extensive baking collection? Particularly interested in the yeasted bread sections--danish, etc. Thanks.
  6. I am interested in knowing if any of you bakers out there have any or all of the following books by Ms. Beranbaum: The Cake Bible The Bread Bible The Pie and Pastry Bible I have read conflicting reviews of these books. A lot of people say the recipes are overly complicated and that if you are the tiniest bit off in your measuring, the end result will be a flop. Others think the books are the holy grail. As I am considering getting these books, I would appreciate your input. I am not a professional baker but I have a many years of baking experience. Thank you.
  7. prasantrin

    learning about wine

    A friend and I found a fabulous wine shop yesterday, and she kept saying, "This one is supposed to be quite good," while we were checking out the wines. I finally asked her, "How do you know?" and she replied, "It was in my comic book." In Japan, where I am, there is a manga called "Kami no Shizuku" aka "Drops of God" and it's all about wine. Always wanting to learn more about wine (because I know nothing), I'm looking for an English version. I know it has been translated into Korean, but I have not yet found any info on an English version. Do you oenophiles think there might be a market for a comic about wine? I think there might be a bit of a snob appeal to wine in the English-speaking world that might preclude an English-version of a wine comic book, but I'm hopeful for a translation of the original. And if I can't find one, I guess it's a good reason for me to practise reading Japanese... By the way, at this wine shop a '03 (I think) bottle of Stag's Leap (I can't remember the grape) was going for Y25000 (just over US$200)...or maybe it was Y32000 (about US$270). Edited to add: if you're interested in seeing what the comic looks like, this blog is a diary of the wines mentioned in the comic. Scroll down for pics of some of the covers. (the site is in Japanese) You can also see pictures of the wines, if you're interested.
  8. I would like to begin Vietnamese cooking- I would like titles of good cookbooks, etc.
  9. I have just bought 4oz of fresh Perigord Truffles and have a question about whether the truffles should be warmed to release their maximum flavour or simply shaved ontop of the dish. Two weeks ago I got ahold of a Burgundy Fall truffle and was struck by the fact that when we shaved it ontop of an omelet the flavour was not nearly as strong as when we made another omelet and rolled the shaved truffles inside. With the Perigord Truffles I plan to use them to make truffled mashed potatoes. I had planned on shaving them over the individual servings at the table but now I am wondering if it would be better to fold them into the potatoes before serving them.
  10. mamster

    Cookbook

    One of the criticisms of your work has been that it's all about the drunken attitude, not enough about the food. Are you going to show your critics up by doing a cookbook aimed at the home cook?
  11. Raw Tuscan Kale Salad with Chiles and Pecorino p.63 I found myself a few minutes from the Farmer's Market that was sure to have Tuscan Kale so I decided to take the plunge. The kale ($1.50) was lovely. The recipe calls for the dressing to be made separately in a bowl but I made it directly in the large bowl I was going to toss the kale in so as not to lose any bits and to even further simplify things. I did not have pecorino so I did sub a nutty asiago. After letting it rest the requisite initial 5 minutes I sampled directly from the bowl. Verdict: really good - I could have put a serious dent in the huge bowl but I wanted to give it some more resting time. An hour later I sampled again and realized that the cold had muted the flavors. After letting it come to room temp, it was even better for its rest. The recipe calls for the salad to be served with toasted bread crumbs, preferably from whole wheat or rye. I had no bread in the house, so taking a cue from her raw brussels sprouts variation I toasted a few walnuts, smashed them with my handy kitchen brick, and tossed them over for an experiment. They were mildly interesting but I preferred the simpler form. I might try it next time with the bread crumbs, or using pecorino versus the asiago, but I really like it as is.
  12. I've gone through the web looking for an older copy of the American Heritage Cookbook, but there are several different versions and I'm not sure which is which. Here are the copies that I've found: The American Heritage Cookbook and Illustrated History of American Eating & Drinking (Hardcover - American Heritage Publishing Company 1964) The American Heritage Cookbook (More than 500 great traditional recipes and 40 historic menus, tested and adapted for modern kitchens) (Paperback - Bantam Books 1975) The American Heritage Cookbook and Illustrated History of American Eating & Drinking, 2-Vol. Boxed Set by eds. American Heritage (Hardcover - American Heritage Publishing Company 1964) The American Heritage Cookbook, (Unknown Binding - American Heritage Press 1969) The American Heritage Cookbook More Than 500 Easy to Make Recipes by Helen McCully (Hardcover - American Heritage Publishing Co. Inc. 1969) American Heritage Cookbook (Hardcover - Random House Value Publishing 1992) American Heritage Cookbook: Boxset 2 Volumes (Hardcover - Random House Value Publishing 1982) Which is which? Who published the actual American Heritage Cookbook? Or are there many with no actual "original"?
  13. JimH

    Food Timeline

    I don't know if someone has posted this link before but I found it today and I thought I'd share. Since I'm unable to operate the link button here's the address: http://www.foodtimeline.org/ There's a lot of old cookbooks that you can view in pdf. If it's already been posted I'll delete this post. Jim
  14. I want to try out some desserts or sweets prepared in Lebanese style. Please suggest some desserts.
  15. I just bought the River Cottage Handbook on making preserves, and I'm interested in getting one or two more. Can anyone here recommend a decent book on the subject? Ideally they would discuss a natural process, with as few unsavory ingredients as possible, or they would spend a fair amount of time discussing traditional ways of making jams (as opposed to modern ways that utilize newfangled equipment).
  16. Can anybody recommend any good books for chutney/relish making? Preferably something that's available in the UK - but open to looking elsewhere. Many Thanks Darryl.
  17. So, if I were to get only one cookbook by Madhur Jaffrey, which would I get? Sincerely, Dante
  18. swissmiss

    Cookbooks

    Thank you for your fascinating answers so far. I am also amazed by the photos on your website. Do you use/read cookbooks? If yes, which ones do you favor and why?
  19. I'm currently reading Julia Child's memoirs, and plan to start on the new Gael Greene book after that. And then, there's nothing on the agenda, and I'm getting worried about that. What is new out there that I may be missing? What's Michael Ruhlman working on? How about Ruth Reichl? (Yes, I've read Garlic & Sapphires. Loved it.) Amanda Hesser? others?
  20. Pweaver1984

    Cuisine Spontanee

    Just wondering if anyone has this book? I have his Girardet book published in 2002, which I really like. Is it a lot different? Translation good? Worth having?
  21. Anna Friedman Herlihy

    Beginner Cookbook for a Dieter

    Hi all, I've just started teaching a friend how to cook (my first long-term student!) for the specific purpose of altering her diet so that she can lose a fairly substantial amount of weight (she is also starting an exercise plan). I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on a cookbook at beginner level that features mainly healthy, quick recipes that tend to feature lean proteins, lots of fiber and veggies, whole grains, no processed foods, and very little refined sugar or flour (this is my approach to maintaining my weight, and I'm hoping it will work for her--a self-described sugar and pasta addict). She does not want to spend a ton of time cooking or cleaning up lots of pots and pans, so I'm hoping for something that features a number of "one pan" type meals. Her typical dinner consists of turkey hot dogs and boxed mac 'n' cheese, and I don't want to leap too far, too fast from this (I figure, baby steps...we've committed a year to the weight loss goal). Tonight I taught her how to cook mustard baked catfish, rice pilaf, and sautéed swiss chard dressed with a balsamic vinaigrette (a veggie she had never eaten before and liked--in fact she loved the whole meal, and it was all completed in 40 minutes which should've been 30, but I was talking a lot and trying to teach about timing and knife skills and the like). Despite my enormous cookbook collection, I don't really have much in the way of basic besides Joy of Cooking, How to Cook Everything, and an old Betty Crocker (this last one certainly does not fit the bill). I tend toward very specialized and/or advanced tomes. I'd appreciate any suggestions on her behalf! PS--she does not often eat pork or beef, preferring chicken, turkey, and fish.
  22. Sur La Table has entered the cookbook market, but instead of following Williams Sonoma's example of single subject books, they've come out with Things Cooks Love, (which is also the name of their new branded line of cooking gadgets -- I think it makes a better brand name than cookbook title, but maybe that's just me.) It's not surprising that much of the book seems to be dedicated to equipment. Not having seen the book itself, I can't say how useful it is, but it could be a good reference for the new cook. Likewise the "Global Kitchen" section, which is designed to give "comprehensive looks at the implements of global cuisines, detailed lists of essentials you’ll want in the pantry for a culinary tour, plus delicious recipes to put it all together." Regardless of the execution, it doesn't sound like something I'd get for myself, but I can see it being a nice gift if it's done well. Has anyone seen this?
  23. Mallet

    Coco

    I just stumbled upon Coco at Chapters yesterday and couldn't resist picking it up. The premise is that 10 of the world's most famous chefs (Ferran Adrià, Alain Ducasse, Alice Waters, René Redzepi, Jacky Yu, Yoshihiro Murata, Fergus Henderson, Shannon Bennett, Mario Batali, and Gordon Ramsay) each select 10 chefs who they think are making important contributions to modern gastronomy. For each of the resulting 100 chefs, there is a short blurb by the "Master" who chose them about what aspect of their cooking is exciting, a brief bio, pictures, and a sample menu + recipes. The final result is a really cool snapshot of what is going on in some of the most exciting restaurants in the world today. Has anybody else seen/bought this book? Have you cooked from it yet? Here's an eGullet friendly link Coco
  24. maxmillan

    Indian Cookbook

    I posted a similar request in the cooking section and thought I'd ask here as well. I'm looking for the ultimate, most complete, comprehensive and authentic cookbook for Indian cuisine to add to my library. What do you recommend? Thanks for your comments.
  25. can someone recommend one please? in english
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