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David Ross

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    Spokane Valley, WA

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  1. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    It took a few different twists and turns with the Nectarberries. I had found the Raspberry Jam with Bitters recipe at Bon Appetit, but my nectarberry jam project really turned into more of a nectarberry compote, which turned out to be a good thing. Then the idea morphed from serving it on an English muffin to a topping for a waffle. I use the old-fashioned Carbon Golden Malted Waffle Mix that they've been making for nearly 90 years. Then simply topped with some of the nectarberry compote. I thought it might need some whipped cream, but I didn't have any and the waffle didn't suffer because of it. Sure beats the gloppy strawberry out-of-a-can and whipped topping that chain restaurants serve.
  2. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    The recipe comes from the May 2018 issue of Bon Appetit. They named it "Raspberry Jam with Bitters." The basic ingredients are 5 cups raspberries, 1 1/4 cups sugar, 1 tbsp. orange zest, 2 tbsp. orange juice, 2 tbsp. lemon juice and 1 tbsp. Angostura bitters. I used the nectarberries, and only 3/4 cup sugar. I didn't have any oranges or lemons, and didn't put it on the shopping list! But I substituted orange-guava juice I had. I used 1 tsp. on Angostura bitters, but then realized I also had Orange Bitters from Scrappy's Bitters in Seattle so added 2 tsp. of that. It tastes a little sweeter than I like, but you can detect the bitters which I think are perfect for this unique caneberry. I don't think the lack of orange or lemon zest made a difference and I almost think it would have drawn away from the berry taste. It was a little runny in consistency, so I added another cup of mashed berries to add some texture. It's more of a sauce than a jam I think. It would be perfect on grilled pork chops or grilled duck breast. And I have to make an early trip to the market tomorrow morning because this is going to be delicious on an English muffin.
  3. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    Well this one was far off what I would normally do. It was a recipe out of Bon Appetit for fresh raspberry jam and they add bitters. I added Angostura bitters but also an orange bitters from a artisanal craft place over in Seattle. I'll take the photo, and taste my nectarberry jam today. You got me to thinking a little more though. I think my fresh rosemary might work, maybe not with this fruit but I might try it. I find the traditional sugar amounts for jams to be way too high for my tastes so I cut it down about 30% or so.
  4. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    It seems like here in the Pacific Northwest things are early both on the west side and the east side where I live. The asparagus was about on time this year and it was a good crop but didn't last long. The raspberries, big and juicy from the west side, seemed to have started big but are pretty much done now. We're edging into our really hot weeks so I think things are going to slow down some.
  5. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    I scored a very rare find at a local market yesterday, these Nectarberry's from Sterino Farms on the west side of the State. Same folks who produced the blackberries I bought last week. The Nectarberry is a cross between the blackberry, raspberry and loganberry. I'd never seen nor heard of them until I spotted them in the market. They have sweet, yet tart flavor and a strong perfume of rose and a little citrus. I'm making them into a jam so we'll see how it goes.
  6. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    Anyone ever made a Summer Pudding? I've never thought it looked very attractive, but now I'm tempted since we've been talking about cane berries.
  7. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    One of my favorite cookbooks is Dungeness Crabs and Blackberry Cobblers by Janie Hibler. It's a testament to cooking of the Pacific Northwest. There are recipes for blackberries boysenberries, loganberries and raspberries. I took a look for some ideas for our cook-off and found these wonderful recipes- -Smoked Quail with Raspberry Mustard Sauce -Raspberry Tea Bread -Raspberry Vinegar with Fresh Rosemary -Boyseberry Swirl Cheesecake with Hazelnut Crust
  8. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    Sounds delicious over a pork tenderloin. I had my eye on a turkey tenderloin the other day and was thinking along those same lines.
  9. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    Two summers ago I created this recipe for a strawberry and watermelon summer salad for a class I was teaching on how to incorporate fresh herbs and spices into dishes. A few days ago I remember this salad and thought it would work really well by using those big blackberries rather than strawberries. The strawberry salad includes berries, cucumber, watermelon, feta cheese that I marinate in olive oil and dried herbs, and Italian green olives. The dressing was olive oil with a bit of sherry vinegar and shallot then fresh basil and mint. For this recipe I used the blackberries rather than strawberries, cucumber, watermelon and simply feta without marinating it in olive oil and herbs. I omitted the olives because I didn't want that strong flavor with these juicy sweet blackberries. I just drizzled a little olive oil over the salad and didn't use the sherry vinegar because again I thought it would be too strong. Then a little basil, along with fresh mint and fresh oregano from pots on my back steps. Pretty delicious for a light and crisp summer salad. Here's a picture of the strawberry version of the salad-
  10. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    These blackberries are so big and juicy I just couldn't put them in a baked cobbler at this point. So I just had them with vanilla bean ice cream.
  11. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    I found these beauties in the market this morning. They're from Sterino Farms in Puyallup, WA, over on the west side of the state. They were $9.00 for the 4 1/2 pint boxes. And they had both red and orange raspberries that were nearly as big as the blackberries. The raspberries were literally 3 times bigger than the small boxes you usually find in the supermarket. I tasted a few and they are incredibly sweet and juicy.
  12. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    Has any one ever made a blackberry ketchup? I'm thinking it might be a nice sauce for grilled pork or chicken, or maybe as an addition to a BBQ sauce.
  13. David Ross

    Cherries

    I'm just a couple hours drive from the cherry orchards around Wenatchee, WA. We've started to see the annual cherries show up in the markets. But what was unusual yesterday was the Rainier cherries were only $1.99 a pound. As Okanagancook mentioned, they are the yellow, red and orange multicolored cherries. Even locally they are more expensive than Bing cherries, usually about $4 a pound. But I found them at $1.99 a pound which is a fantastic bargain even around here. I usually just buy them as eating cherries.
  14. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    I first learned of the term "cane berries" from my Father who for many years worked for the Oregon Agricultural Department in Salem. He headed up the various commodity commissions that are made up of farmers and ranchers who work with the State to promote their products among other things. The berries down there really sweeten up in July. Every Sunday we'd drive over to friends my Father knew who had a horse farm in Molalla, just west of Salem. The sides of those country roads are bursting with wild blackberries in summer and it's not at all unusual to see folks stopped along the roadside picking berries. Show that photo to my city friends today and they'd think I was poisoning myself by eating wild berries that had been exposed to car exhaust. Well, maybe, but I'm still standing and it beats spending $6.99 for a 3oz. plastic hallock of supermarket berries. Free, wild and sweet.
  15. David Ross

    eG Cook-Off #78: The Cane Berries of Summer

    Oh my oh my. The last photo, with the ice cream is just about taken me to the moon and back! And it reminds me of many family summer dinners at my Grandmother's farmhouse in Prineville, Oregon where we would have blackberry cobbler or pie with homemade ice cream. That was in the days where we used that awful old hand crank ice cream bucket with salt and ice. And we turned and turned. But it was wonderful cranking that ice cream churn out on the porch and scooping it right there onto warm cobbler. Heck, now that I think about it I should go back to that method and leave the expensive electric ice cream machine, that weighs a ton, locked in the pantry! Or of course just buy a very good ice cream. So delicious everything you've shown us.
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