Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Reference'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Categories

  • Help Articles

Found 93 results

  1. Hi. I'm brand new to this site. I used to be on Chowhound but I see now that that site is a mess. I found this site and it looks pretty cool. The main reason I joined is I’m looking for recommendations for a restaurant to hold my wedding in March 2018. We were hoping maybe in Brooklyn but we are open to anything interesting. There will be 55-60 people and the ceremony will also be at the restaurant. I’m thinking of a brunch/early afternoon affair, most likely on a weekend. Would love to find a funky/old school/unique/charming type of place for my sweetheart. Inexpensive please! Thank you in advance!
  2. Breville Smart Oven Repair?

    My Breville BSO 800XL just died on it's second birthday, after only *extremely* light use at my beach house. Just won't power up. Reading online, I learned that a common failure mode is the thermal fuse blowing -WHICH IS DESIGNED TO BLOW AT <450F. This is a $3 part at Radio Shack, and there is a detailed instruction on how to replace it here: http://virantha.com/2014/03/02/fix-your-breville-smart-oven-by-replacing-the-thermal-fuse/ So I guess I'll give fixing it myself a try and report back. Has anyone here done this repair? Was it successful? And why would Breville use a fuse that is lower than the appliance's top heat settings? Thanks!
  3. Advice: Braising in Smoker?

    I've had an idea flowing across my brain waves over the last few months. It's on every channel and I'm getting ready to pull the trigger. I'd like to try to braise a dish in my smoker. I am thinking of braising a rabbit, but the I'm not looking for guidance on the protein/ingredients, rather the technique. I turn to you, o internet, in hope you will tell me your secrets. Has anyone ever braised in their smoker before? I've done some research, but I haven't seen much on the "how to" for the technique. Here's my plan: - Brown the rabbits on skillet (stovetop) - Get the aromatics/other stuffz sweated browned, etc. - (MEANWHILE) Smoker heats up to 300-325 degrees. - Add stock to rabbit, bring to a simmer on the stove top. - Transfer to smoker, braise uncovered for 1-2 hours, then cover with foil to finish for as long as necessary. I've seen folks smoke and then braise, but I haven't seen much on the idea of braising something IN the smoker. I saw something on CookingwithMe.at about doing something similar with pork belly, but that's about it. All I know is that after using stock+drippings from a smoked turkey created this CRAZY MIND-BLOWING flavor, so I'm basing this a lot off that idea. -Franz
  4. The 2017 iteration of the International Home & Housewares Show is being held March 18-21 at McCormick Place in Chicago. This is the world's 2nd-largest tradeshow for the cookware and housewares industry, close behind Ambiente in Frankfurt. It is a cornucopia of what's new and what's coming down the pike in the world of cookware, and if you've ever wondered about why makers do the things they do, this is your opportunity to talk with execs and their product development people (e.g., you can discuss ceramics with the 6th-gen owner of Emile Henry). It takes an able cookware geek a full two days to cover all the booths. Are any eGulls or eGuys besides me attending?
  5. I'm posting it here on the grounds that national Food Guides are, by their nature, intended to be used as references. Many of you will have read today's news stories about the proposed changes to Canada's food guidelines. All of the stories I read mentioned that Health Canada was soliciting input from the general public, as well as health/food industry professionals. None of them, alas, actually gave a link to the "consultation" page at Health Canada's website. For those who wish to weigh in, here it is: http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/health-system-systeme-sante/consultations/foodguide-guidealimentaire/index-eng.php
  6. Greetings

    Hello Egullet family.. its good to be back on here, been away for a while, i hope to find some new trending recipes .. and be ready to get some African dish recipes for those who love African Dishes, You can Read and &nbsp;Download &nbsp;Mp3 Audios here of some Nigerian dishes, and there are more coming in which i would be placing on here.. Thanks
  7. The Science of Herbs and Spices

    Another great article from the great Harold McGee. "The Science of Herbs and Spices" on Lucky Peach. Fascinating as ever. Now I just need to find the Chinese for "chitosan".
  8. The Thermocouple versus the Thermistor

    I emailed OXO a while ago, asking if they could design and market a thermocouple based thermometer. I reasoned that with their market penetration, the cost would be in the same range of current thermometers. I never heard back and cannot guess why there was no response. Most consumer grade digital thermometers use a thermistor. I had one of the first Polder Probe/wire (or cable) thermos and I loved it. It had a cable or wire, shielded in a metal braid. The new ones, use a silicon covering. Most of the reviews say that probe breaks and Polder has addressed that by adding a "handle" (of sorts) to the probe. Reasonable care while inserting and extracting the probe would have been more sensible by the reviewers who broke there devices, but the handle works, too. Still, this device and as I said above, most all temperature reading devices use a thermistor, or even a bi-metal strip (don't call me a perv!). The thermocouple devices read a much more accurate temperature range. From here on I'm spelling thermocouple as t/c. The Cook's Country (and under a multitude of other names) commonly shows the Thermapen t/c. At $100 it's pricey for the kitchen, but not for what it is. I imagine there are loads of industrial, scientific, and technical uses for it. There the $100 is worth it. The website: Cooking For Engineers sells the device for a "MERE" $79. That site reviews a number of thermometers and puts the t/c on top. So dear reader, I must ask, why have the OXO's and Sur La Tables, Williams-Sonomas, and the like not found a way to place a t/c probe in a thermometer?
  9. When grandmum made Cappelletti last christmas i took some pics , so i can share this tutorial. Cappelletti are pillows of pasta stuffed with bread, parmesan and stracotto juice, cooked in a chicken broth soup. So what is Stracotto: its just a Pot Roast made from some tough and unexpensive beef cut, simmered for a long time, 6 to 10 hours depending on the cut you choose and your willingness of making the ultimate sacrifice driyng your meat in order to get the best roast juice vs having a proper and tender pot roast on your table.
  10. I have a centrifuge and have been working my way though some of the recipes that benefit or require a centrifuge. Also have a similar carbonation set up as the one that is mentioned in the book and will be getting to the carbonation section next. Anyone else experimenting with this James Beard award winning cocktail book?
  11. It may be that I have missed it in the topics, but I can't find any reference to the 2011 publication of Cook's Illustrated Cookbook: 2,000 Recipes from 20 Years of America's Most Trusted Food Magazine. It appears to retail in the USA for $40 but is available on Amazon for far less than that. Obviously lots of recipes with interesting notes also. I always love the notes and explanations. Back home in Canada my library doesn't carry Cook's Illustrated and the larger city library has only a few issues. I've borrowed it from the local library in Utah and am thinking about buying it. Any thoughts, please ?
  12. Mostly vegetables, but not limited to that - what's the best book out there.
  13. Mel-Fry

    I don't eat a lot of fried foods, at least, I think I don't. A friend of mine who once worked in the restaurant business told me about Mel-Fry. I understand that it's a "bad" oil to begin with, that it is used to fry for a long time before changing it, and that a truck needs to come round and suck out the Mel-Fry to get rid of it. I am hoping that Willie Nelson's car is running on Mel-Fry. How bad is it and how prevalent is it? I'd never thought about my occasional Indian banana pakoora or Nathan's french fries or doughnuts as having been steeped in grotesque dirty chemicals. I guess another treat has gone out the window . . .
  14. This is the philosophy hub of the English-speaking gastronomy world. This is the place where Douglas Baldwin posted his calculations and it is the birthplace of Modernist Cuisine. I bow down respectfully and really mean it. I am also well aware that society member Vengroff created the outstanding Sous Vide Dash. I myself have often used the information provided. As a matter of fact the project that I am about to present wouldn’t be the way it is without the influences mentioned above. On Tuesday November 11th we will release the Sous Vide °Celsius iOS app 3.0. An app with sous vide recommendations, timers and tutorials. Simple. It has been criticised in the past. It was criticised for not being worth its money. That hurt. So we sat down and tried to make it better. Sous Vide °Celsius is our distillate and experience about what works when using the sous vide technique. Food is never an exact geometrical shape. Waiting for an extra hour for a piece to reach the additional half degree is impractical. We tested sous vide recommendations that work and developed tutorials to make the first steps easy. The original was written in German. So we really need feedback from the English speaking world. We want this to be a useful app. An app that is worth it. Since its value is based on the content, it is more difficult to judge, but I am sure this is the right place to find out. I hereby would like to offer you the possibility to test the app before the official release. I have no idea how many of you will respond. Please write an email. I will reply with more information and a link to register as a beta-tester. My offer stands until November 10th or until I run out of promocodes to cover your free app after the beta-testing phase.
  15. Recently took a big casserole cookbook out of our local library. Taste of Home Casseroles. Lots of lovely photos and over 400 recipes. Alas, many of the recipes call for cans of cream of this soup and that soup, packages of instant rice and potato mixes, refrigerated rolls and so on. And almost all the recipes were very North American. Not that I am damning these ingredients to the nether realms...I just want to know: where are the good casserole cookbooks? Are there any? Who has a title for me? Thanks.
  16. Sweet and Vicious (Alex Day) with Bulleit rye (Old Overholt was specified), Dolin dry vermouth, amaro Nonino, maple syrup, muddled apple. A bit on the sweet side indeed (even though I had reduced the maple syrup), but with the Granny Smith that I used there was a nice acidity to balance things out. It reminded me of some Calvados-based cocktails that I like. As a side note, the muddled apple seemed to soak up the drink a bit, so it was a bit smaller than expected.
  17. The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
  18. 6 books outlining every dish they came up with over this time with essays etc. Appears to be about the size of Modernist Cuisine and has about the same price tag. I can't say I'm really that excited about it but I preordered anyway to add it to the collection as it wil surely be a historical record of what the pinnacle of that movement in cooking was about at the time. Even though it only shuttered 2 years ago, it seems like so much has changed in the culinary landscape. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0714865486/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  19. I must start by saying that I have huge respect for what Alex and Aki are doing. I adore their previous book and one of the first things I read in the morning is their website's mailing. In anticipation of Maximum Flavor (MF), I went back to the very beginning of their blog and read or skimmed through years of writing, witnessing how Ideas in Food have contributed to some of the big developments that characterize modern cuisine today. I live in Europe, where MF is not sold yet. I bought it through pre-order on Amazon, had it shipped to a US address and had a friend bring from there. Perhaps my expectations were too high, perhaps I have developed into a more sophisticated and knowledgeable cook over the last few years but this book was a major disappointment. The words that come to mind are: simple (selection of recipes), US focused (ingredients hard to find in Europe, brands, recipes) and unappetizing (photography, colors). This is not so say that this book is bad, but it is not a book for me any more. It is a book for a relatively average American home cook, how has somehow heard of Aki and Alex, and is willing to improve their pancake, burger and cake making. I have cooked successfully enough of complex dishes in full from Alinea, Eleven Madisson Park, Momofuku, Modernist Cuisine etc and I was craving something that would help me come up with complex and unusual flavors, that Alex and Aki can do so well (very noticeable in the first years of their blog), or even the big brother for their previous book, with more flavor enhancing techniques and brilliant recipes. In the entire book, there are perhaps two or max three things new to me, such as sugar syrup roasting nuts, the konbu beans combination and I cannot think of the third one. Also, I find a lot of ideas lacking originality - microwave sponge cakes or rough puff pastry are not exactly what I hoped to find there. I would sent the book it back but shipping costs from EU to US may outweigh the refund I can get - will look into it though. I understand this book may have a significant (US) mass appeal and be commercially attractive for the authors, I somehow feel that their brand has been diluted for me. I will never again buy a piece of their writing without having it seen first and making sure that it is what I expect it to be. [Host Note: Amazon Society-friendly link to Maximum Flavor by Aki Komozawa and Alexander Talbot]
  20. Cookies Homemade

    This Recipe that I am going to share, its by my mom. We used to have these cookies since Childhood. To me its a very traditional Recipe. any flavors you want to add, all depending upon your taste. I used Chocolate, Vanilla and Raspberry for that. Same recipe goes for all cookies with distinct use of essences and food colors. Well here we go, it makes about 20 to 30 cookies, enough for your family while having tea/coffee. I love its crunchy texture outside and softy material of a classic cookie from inside. So for making a cookie you gonna have: COOKIES HOMEMADE: You will need: 1/2 cup unsalted Butter/clarified Butter 1 cup Sugar 2 Eggs 1 tsp Baking Powder Milk 1/4 cup(Use Milk as required, dough should be soft, add it if you feel stickiness) 2 1/2 cup Flour Vanilla Essence(or any flavor you like to have in cookies) Steps to Follow Beat Butter and Sugar. Add Sieved Flour & Baking Powder. Add flavor , Essence, Eggs, make a dough. Add some warm milk if you feel to have in your Dough. Make a soft dough. Then cutout soft cookies and Bake. This Recipe works for simple Vanilla Cookie. I filled my cookies with small pieces of Dark Chocolate. If you need some amendments or more flavors, add Cocoa Powder or Raspberry Essence with Red Food Color as I did.
  21. Hi everyone, Its been several years since I've posted on this forum but hope to get involved more in the future now that I've changed jobs! Anyway, before buying Frederic Lalos' book, I mulled over buying it for almost 1 year. There is very limited writeup on this book and surely others would be going through the same decision making issues. In addition, we'll never know when this book'll be out of print. The reasons for my reluctance to purchase it is that here in Asia, this book + shipping from Europe would cost more than US$120. Do I really need to spend that kind of money when Hamelman, Dan Leader and Reinhart and other books would cover it? Thanks to my new job, I decided to buy it and it was the best decision I ever made. Firstly, this book touches on lots of basic knowledge covered in other books in terms of kneading, flour types, etc. Bear in mind that the recipes in this book use French flours, which are not as strong as American flours. Asian bakers may rejoice because our flours are quite similar in strength. Here in Bangkok, and in Singapore where I come from, we can get flours from Waitrose and other Italian as well as German flours. The most important aspect of this book for a professional baker or a serious home baker is that there are recipes dedicated to direct proofing, delayed overnight bulk fermentation method and a deferred overnight proofing method. All in the same recipe. This gives you timings and recipe options to better plan your baking. In addition, he gives the exact starting temperature and recommended end of mix temperature to ensure that the bread grows at the suggested pace. I have not come across any other bread book that is so detailed in this aspect. There are a lot of interesting French breads in here, but if you are looking for something really uniquely European, Dan Leader's book 'Local Breads' may be more your thing. However, if you are looking to get a first hand insight into how a professional baker executes his recipes, Frederic Lalos' book is exhaustive in this aspect. This link gives a more thorough review for this wonderful book. I as well give links to where to buy this book, with no commercial benefit of my own. I hope this review will help in your purchase making decision because it was something I wish I had after hours of fruitless web research.
  22. Seaside Foraging

    Chef Andrew Taylor takes his forays into the Cascades to a new level as chef/owner of Eventide Oyster Co. in Portland, Maine. Writer Sharon Kitchens joins him and co-owners Arlin Smith and Chef Mike Wiley in a skiff around the shoreline and come back loaded with interesting stuff: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sharon-kitchens/beach-foraging-maine_b_3372621.html Peak foraging season runs mid June to end of July here in the Northestern USA
  23. The title "It's Only Slow Food Until You Try to Eat It" does not really give one an idea of what this book is really about. The subtitle: "Misadventures of a Suburban Hunter Gatherer" is much more descriptive of the contents. First of all, it's got a lot of very funny writing. And there are some real "characters" that the author describes so well that I felt I could shake hands with them. I highly recommend this book for anyone who really loves food and wonders why we eat what we eat and what happened to the things that once were common on the tables of America - or for that matter, other countries where it is difficult to find anything but "factory food" unless one lives in a truly rural area. Here is the review I wrote for Amazon. I received the book via the Amazon Vine program so am required to publish a review but this is one I would have reviewed anyway. Funny, enthusiastic, witty and insightful. This is really a remarkable book because it looks at things that we see every day in a different light - that is, consider how many times you may walk past something that in the past was a source of food for many of our ancestors. And not just Native Americans but ordinary folks like me and you. I grew up on a farm in the 1940s when most of the people in the area still gathered wild "greens" in the spring, pawpaws, maypops, berries, wild asparagus, onion grass, ramps, plantain, watercress, mallow, nasturtiums, nettles and purslane as well as the wild mushrooms that only the experts in the family were allowed to pick. There was also hunting and fishing, finding bee trees (for the local "bee charmer" to harvest). The author writes with wonderful humor and modesty in that what he was doing is often labor intensive but certainly for one who truly believes in eating what is available for free (and often tastier than anything in the stores) it is worthwhile, totally satisfying. He writes about his backyard garden and reading his description of a homegrown tomato and the incredible flavor, causes me to wish that I had managed to find the effort to plant some this year. I am growing herbs, onions, shallots and radishes but thats it for this year. His description of his adventures in Cajun country had me laughing out loud and the writing makes the scenes so vivid that it is easy for me to picture exactly what was happening. We hunted frogs when I was a child but we used long-handled fish nets because my grandpa was afraid we would stab each other (or ourselves) if we had gigs. The rule was, if you caught it, you cleaned it once one was old enough to handle a knife safely. His trip to Alaska to spend some time with the Native Gwich'in people of the Alaskan tundra is equally inspiring. It also points up the problems these people are having with the attempts of the oil companies to exploit an area that is CRITICAL to the continuing success of the caribou as the ANWR area is their calving ground and not even the natives go there because it is important to not disturb the routine that has been going on for hundreds of thousands of years, or longer. Foraging around San Francisco can be successful but the writer indicates that some people appear to be in it only for the notoriety (or the money) and not from any personal conviction about sustainability. The local expert who takes him on a seafood excursion is at the other end of the spectrum, doing it for the sheer pleasure of finding something that other people do not even realize is there. And, it is also a love story... I recommend this book to anyone who likes to read about urban ADVENTURES that anyone can have if they take the time to look around and actually SEE what is there if one just bothers to take some extra time. I wish that I was still physically capable of doing some of these things but age and arthritis forbid it. Meanwhile I can enjoy the experiences of writers like Bill Heavey vicariously through his evocative writing.
  24. Hello All! I wanted to share some great news-- my friend, French cook and culinary instructor Kate Hill, is bringing famed butcher and charcuterie master Dominique Chapolard for a bunch of workshops. There's still seats available at some of the sites--here is a link with the details: http://kitchen-at-camont.com/2013/02/24/two-day-workshops-in-the-usa-the-french-pig-making-farmstead-charcuterie/ TTFN, jeff
  25. Spice Cookbooks

    There doesn't seem to be anything in the threads about spice cookbooks. I just bought The Book of Spices by Frederic Rosengarten, Jr. Copyright 1969. (He has a nut book, too, different thread.) Fabulous illustrations. I also have McCormick's Spices of the World Cookbook and The Spice Cookbook by Avanelle Day and Lillie Stuckey. Anyone have opinions or recommendations?
×