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Found 1,121 results

  1. =Mark

    Chinese Hot & Sour Soup

    Chinese Hot & Sour Soup From Mark's Website cups chicken stock 1/4 lb julienned lean pork or chicken 2 T garlic & red chile paste 2 T soy sauce 3/4 tsp ground white pepper 4 eggs, beaten 5 T cornstarch 1 c sliced shittake mushrooms 1 can peeled straw mushrooms 1 can sliced bamboo shoots 1 can sliced water chestnuts 1 can baby corn ears 1 cake soft tofu, sliced into 1/4 inch cubes 1/4 c white vinegar 1 tsp sesame oil 1/4 c dried black fungus (cloud ears), soaked in water for one hour, drained and sliced. finely chopped scallions for garnish Preparation: 1. Bring stock to a simmer, add soy, pork, mushrooms & chile paste, simmer for 10 minutes. 2. add pepper, vinegar, bamboo, baby corn, water chestnuts, fungus and tofu, simmer 10 min 3. Mix cornstarch with 5 tbsp water and add. bring back to a simmer and pour the eggs in a very thin stream over the surface. Let stand for 10 seconds before gently stirring in the sesame oil. 4. serve with a garnish of chopped scallions. The pepper, vinegar and chile paste can be varied to taste. You're a chile-head, you know what to do! Keywords: Soup, Appetizer, Easy, Hot and Spicy, eGCI ( RG270 )
  2. Doodad

    tofu dumpling

    Can someone tell me how to make tofu dumplings like the sister in Eat Drink Man Woman was making? I can't find anything here or online. Or were they made up for the movie?
  3. Daznz

    chinese hotpot

    Hi Im looking at doing a chinese hotpot at home..Ive never had one before only seen pics of them on the net...Can anyone help with types of Marinated meats and veg used etc. and also what types of oils of broths are used in the pot Thanks Daza
  4. Daznz

    Dipping Sauce ?

    Hi everyone im from New Zealand . I would like to say this forum is out standing I really love cooking and im really starting to enjoy chinese cooking ive struggled to make good chinese at home until i got mrs Chiangs Szechwan cookbook off ebay for 90c and i have ordered The Chinese Kitchen by Eileen Yin-Fei Lo . I am making Shrimp balls the dipping sauce she calls for it a salt and pepper mix I would like to have two more dipping sauces on the table, If anyone can help me out with two sauces that will go well with shrimp balls i would love the recipes Thanks Dale
  5. baranoouji

    Leftover Chinese Duck

    :erm: I've been laid up with bronchitis for the last two weeks, and my sister tried to cheer me up by bringing a full-blown roasted Chinese duck. The problem is, I can't swallow anything that isn't the consistency of pudding or soup, so I couldn't do the dish justice. I also have absolutely no stamina for cooking right now. Right now, the duck sits forlornly in my fridge, uneaten. Can it be saved? What can I do with it? It seems such a waste.
  6. Which region would the dish of steamed pork ribs in lotus leaf come from? I'm trying to identify the regionality of the dish to try to see where its from so as to know if you're supposed to use soybean paste or broadbean paste to make it. I've found two recipes that seem to be about making the dish- steamed pork ribs covered in rice powder. But the first recipe used broadbean paste while the latter used soybean paste. http://www.holyshitake.com/archives/2004/11/steamed_ribs_in_rice_powder_with_sweet_potato.html http://www.nicolemones.com/pork-ribs-in-lotus-leaf.html Anybody else have any more tips or recipes on how to make this dish?
  7. Hello, nice to meet you all! I went to Hong Kong 2 years ago, and one day, our tour guide brought us to this little shop that has the most delicious dessert combination I ever tasted. It consists of black sesame paste and an egg white custard/pudding. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ For the black sesame paste, I found several recipes, all of which calls for rice. I was wondering, will the rice cause the black sesame paste to be more bland, or are there other recipes which only calls for black sesame? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Next is the puzzling part of the dessert, which is the egg white custard/pudding. It is sweet, and has the appearance and texture of soya bean curd dessert. So, I hunted up a recipe: ::: Steamed Fresh Milk Custard ::: Fresh milk 2 Cups Egg White 4 Sugar 4 Tablespoonfuls Scald fresh milk. Beat egg white and sugar lightly. Gradually pour warm milk into egg white mixture, strain. Transfer to heat-proof bowls, steam. This recipe was originally the custard with ginger in it, but I omitted the ginger, and it is the closest I can find for the egg white custard/pudding. The original custard/pudding that I ate didn't really have the egg white 'taste'. I'm not too sure how to describe it. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ I hope there are people here who have tasted the dessert I described here in Hong Kong too. At any rate, advice is welcome! I will try to make this dessert as soon as I have some free time.
  8. Here's the article on MSN: "Bad buzz: Chinese bloggers bash Starbucks" Starbucks bashing isn't new. But that it's happening in China is new.
  9. Inspired by some wine I bought, I want to take a stab at Szechuan style cuisine. Help me prepare Szechuan or Szechuan style food in my home kitchen. Right now, I am looking for the spicy Szechuan food (though I understand it's not always spicy). I do have some Szechuan peppercorns. I also understand that chilies are a big part of the spice in this style. Living in Texas, I am no stranger to chilies. Both fresh and dried. Fresh jalapenos and serranos are comon items in my kitchen. For dried, I have guajillos and arbols on hand. Do these work in Szechuan cooking, too? What about meats? Beef, pork, chicken.. I like it all. Seafood, too. (shrimp, scallops, etc.) For preparation, I want to start with pretty easy and not too many ingredients. Simple stir fry is always good. something I can knock out pretty quickly on a weekday if I do some prep work the night before would be awesome. Easily obtainable ingredients is key, too. So, tell me what to do! I want to get cooking.
  10. (Edit: This thread is a split of several posts from the thread on Jean-Georges Vongerichten's new Chinese restaurant, "66," in New York City) ----------------------------------------- I'll tell you what I'm hearing, and I bet this is true: you're all talking about technique. That's clearly an area in which Jean-Georges Vongerichten is going to have to play catch-up. I think he can get there -- the guy can do anything -- but that's where he's weak. But here's where he is totally going to kick the ass of every Chinese restaurant America has ever seen: he's going to have the best product. The reality is that most Chinese restaurants -- even the very high-end ones -- get crap-ass product when you judge it by the standards of top-tier haute-cuisine restaurants. I mean, when is the last time you had an excellent piece of beef in a Chinese restaurant? Never, if I may be so bold as to answer for you. It just doesn't happen under any normal set of circumstances. But if Jean-Georges Vongerichten is buying beef, he's going to get it from a serious supplier and it's going to be steakhouse-quality. This is where he's going to be the market leader: ingredients. Now let's see if he can get his kitchen up to speed on cooking those ingredients. If he succeeds at that, will anybody be able to touch him? I don't think so; not until the whole Chinese restaurant community moves into a new era in order to catch up.
  11. Hello I always thought that every chinese savoury recipe required ginger & garlic, but now I see some recipes do & some don't. Are there rules for when to use garlic & ginger or just 1 or the other? Many Thanks Andy
  12. would anyone have any reccomendations as to shops or markets selling SEA ingredients in Shanghai, especiallly herbs and fresh ingredients (lemongrass, lime leaves, galanga)? My brother is having a Thai curry jones. Thanks Michael
  13. Mr Wozencroft

    Chinese sauce brands...

    For the last year i've been trying out various brands of the same products to find out which ones I prefer. So I thought I'd list a few that I recommend: Lee Kum Kee Double Deluxe Soy Sauce. Pearl River preserved black beans. BaiJai chilli bean paste (which has the highest amount of fermented broads beans I have seen so far) Lee Kum Kee oyster sauce. Does anyone use any of these brands? Are there others that you prefer? Please feel fee to list your preferences.
  14. browniebaker

    Chinese Coconut Squares

    Chinese Coconut Squares Serves 8 as Dessert. Here's the recipe for the fluffy, snow-white, coconut-flavored gelatin squares served at Chinese dim sum. 2 tablespoons powdered gelatin 1-3/8 cups boiling water 1 5-ounce can evaporated milk 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon coconut extract 2 egg whites Lightly oil shallow one-quart square dish. Dissolve gelatin in boiling water. Stir in evaporated milk, sugar, and coconut extract. Cool to room temperature. In separate bowl, whip egg whites until it is fluffy and holds stiff peaks. Place bowl of gelatin mixture in a larger bowl filled with ice. As gelatin begins to chill and firm up over ice, fold egg whites in. Spread into prepared dish. Refrigerate until set. Cut into squares. Serve cold. N.B.: To avoid the risk of salmonella in raw egg whites, one may substitute the appropriate amount of pasteurized egg whites, or egg whites reconstituted from a powder. Keywords: Dessert, Pudding, Chinese, Easy ( RG962 )
  15. I am cooking a lot, trying to learn about Chinese and SE Asian cooking. My books refer to black soy and thin or light soy, as well as thick soy. I also have one called Bango Sweet Soy in the fridge that has palm sugar in it and is from Indonesia (oh, how sad things are there). Does anyone know...Are thick soy, black soy, and sweet soy the same thing or are they different? My Koon Chun thick soy lists "soy bean extract" and molasses as ingredients. This makes me wonder about making my own using soy and molasses. I found an earlier thread about favorite soy sauces, but I still don't get this and appreciate any shared knowledge. Taking a moment to figure this out might save me from eating all the BBQ Pork before the significant other returns home. Marinated all night. Cooked till tender and delicious. Mmmmmm
  16. Anyone know what that stuff is? I've been trying to figure it out since about 10 minutes after I ate it in the Muslim Quarter of Xi'an in late 2008. It's some kind of starch, mashed or rolled very small, and chewy mutton or lamb or some other strong-flavored meat. I think it had a five-spice powder flavor, or at least star anise. The receptionists at my hostel told me the starch was wheat, but their grasp of non-hostel related English was limited, so I can't be sure of the accuracy of that information. Yeah it was DELICIOUS, and I'd like to make some attempt at replicating it, but clearly I need a little more information before I step down that path...I googled everything I could think of back in 2008, but didn't find anything. Anyone have a clue? Or know of a better place to pose this question? Cheers! edit: hmm guess maybe this should've gone in China: dining. Sorry! Though I am looking for a recipe...
  17. Big Bunny

    Scallop Sauce

    The other day I came across a bottled sauce made with scallops at my local Chinese grocery. Is this used like oyster sauce? I haven't opened the bottle yet, but it looks good. BB
  18. Willbear

    Chinese Oakland

    There has been ample discussion on chowhound, here, and other food sites about dim sum. Does anybody have a recommendation for the best place to have a moderately priced chinese dinner in Oakland's chinatown? (Especially with one's 60 and 70-something parents along) Their favorate place seems to be Little Shin Shin on Piedmont avenue. I'd like to expand their horizons towards chinatown. Has anybody tried Legendary Palace for dinner perchance?
  19. Am trying to work out the Chinese name for these boiled dumplings. The filling is generally made only of prawns and cloud ear funghi, and perhaps bamboo shoots - with a "fun gor" type wrapper; that is, a frilly wheat flour type, not rice pastry. And in yum cha restaurants where they serve from carts, these are always kept on a dedicated cart with boiling water, and a serving boiled to order at the cart - sometimes this is the same cart that serves the gai lan with oyster sauce. Dipping sauce is generally a mix of soy, sesame oil, sugar, sliced scallions, ginger and chilli. I simply cannot hold out till next yum cha visit to ask the trolley ladies, so please sally forth with your wisdom, dear eGulleteers!
  20. ulterior epicure

    Chinese in Kansas City

    Inspired by my recent trip to China, I'm starting this thread to keep the food comin'. Now, I know I won't find anything like I had in China here in the Midwest, but I'll bet I can come pretty close. Would love to hear from all you adventurous eaters out there! I'll get the party started with China Tom's. The following is cut-and-pasted from my latest blog entry. The Tengs, friends of mine, own a small private farm in Richmond, Missouri. Tom's entire 25 acres is dedicated to Asian pears. He has about four or five different varieties. Tonight, we went to his restaurant, China Tom's, and got to try some of them. His wife brought out a platter with two different kinds - an Asian pear (a.k.a "Korean pears" or "Yali pears") which grows all throughout Eastern Asia and an American varietal, with a darker and thicker skin. The Asian varietal is crisper and more juicy. The skin color ranges from a pale yellow to a butter yellow. The flavor starts off with a little tartness but is quickly chased away by intense sweetness. The American variatal, not surprisingly is pure sweetness from start to finish - geared toward our saccharine-cravin' palates. The American varietal is more dense, less crisp, and a tougher chew - in part because of the slightly thicker and more brownish skin. Of course, though tempted, man does not live on pears alone. We ordered food - a very simple meal, but satisfying nonetheless. A successful farmer, Mr. Teng is also a worthy chef. Tonight he prepared one of my favorite dishes at his restaurant - huang gua tsao la pi (or huang gua tsao liang fun) - cucumber with mung bean noodle salad. The dressing is very spicy and garlicky - basically a mix of vinegar, garlick, a bit of salt and sugar, a few drops of rice wine, red chile flakes and chopped cilantro. Wow, is it good. The mung bean noodles (liang fun, or la pi - which literally translates to "pulled skin) are transluscent, broad and thin sheets of pasta - somewhat like spring roll wrappers or a large sheet of thick gelatin. Mr. Teng prefers using Korean mung bean broad noodles because they are sturdier and have a nice chew. To make this dish, Mr. Teng first immerses the noodle sheets in boiling water. As soon as they are softened, he immediately cuts them into pieces. If you wait until the noodles go cold, they'll curl up and become difficut to cut. Working quickly, he tosses in sliced cucumbers (English or Asian) and mixes it with the dressing. What results is a garlicky and spicy noodle salad. Yum. We also had a plate of stir-fried flounder slices ($10.95). The silver dollar-sized pieces of fish had been cooked with fermented soybeans (do ce), snow peas, cucumbers, and carrots. I dare any American chef to produce a plate of sliced fish as exquisitely tender and soft as Mr. Teng's. A plate of chopped and stir-fried you tsai (a Chinese mustard green) ($7.50) and a big bowl of rice vermicelli (mi fun) and pickled greens (shien tsai) soup rounded out the meal. If you're ever in the area, check out China Tom's. Order from the "Special Authentic Chinese Menu" for some more traditional food. Of course, if you want my favorite dish, huang gua tsao la pi, you might want to call ahead to make sure they can prepare it for you. To see all of the dishes from my meal, visit my flickr account. China Tom's Chef-Owner Tom Teng 2816 West 47th Avenue Kansas City, Kansas 66103 913.432.1597 If you're interested in what other Chinese restaurants I'd recommend, check out this posting on my blog. Cheers. u.e.
  21. Can anyone recommend a good Chinese cooking class in Beijing, Chengdu or Hong Kong? My wife and I are going to travel to China on vacation and have enjoyed these types of classes in other countries and thought there must be something similiar in China. We are looking for a half-day or full-day class. Thanks for your help.
  22. Prasatin had mentioned she had her best ratio of dough to filling (haam) in her baos. This got me thinking, when making your baos how much filling to dough do you like? I LOVE a slightly sweet dough, so when I make my baos for myself I love having really fluffy dough with a little filling that has a strong flavored sauce. So of course my favorite is char siu bao with thick dough and a little filling. But when I make it for other people I go for a thinner dough and more meat. Which is why I like to make dai bao for other people, but I don't personally like it myself. Too much meat for me. Now bao wrapped around lap cheung like a pig in the blanket and steamed....mmmmm that is comfort food to me, and at some points even better than char siu bao. It's easy, it's meaty, it's got a high ratio of dough to meat. The only bao I like a lot of filling in is one made with ground pork, lots of chopped cabbage, mushroom and vermicelli, because it doesn't have a lot of meat in it. edited to protect the innocent.
  23. Today I made a Sweet and Sour Chicken that was to die for! Absolutely scrumptious! Crispy Fried Chicken bits, White Rice, Pineapple, and the onions, celery, carrots, and garlic came fresh from my own farm! I even got the Wok-Hei on an American electric stove by using the Bao method (and opening all the windows and doors!) But, I used a BOTTLE of KRAFT Sweet-n-Sour Sauce! Will you ever forgive me? Weepingly yours; -Johntodd
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