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Found 568 results

  1. SobaAddict70

    Ketchup

    I've never been able to figure out why foodies tend to despise ketchup. Like just about any condiment, it has its applications. If you don't like it, there are a million other condiments out there. The same goes for Worcestershire sauce and barbecue sauce, deli mustard and honey mustard, pickle relish and mango chutney, and jarred salsa. Why ask why? Just enjoy it for what it is. Maybe I'm weird for liking ketchup. I also will eat pickle relish straight out of a jar. Ditto for hoisin sauce. Soba PS. In the omuraisu thread in the Japan forum, Hiroyuki asks pretty much the same question, ao I thought I'd ask all y'all.
  2. Suvir Saran

    Pickles / Preserves

    In America, we think of pickles as a kind of a relish, or side dish – a cured vegetable that adds a sour or tart note to the meal. We pickle a variety of different vegetables but, for whatever the differences, pickles all have a recognizably “pickled” taste. Indian pickles use many of the same ingredients – salt, vinegar, coriander, mustard seeds, turmeric, cinnamon, cloves and ginger – but they present some of the most diverse and exotic tastes and textures imaginable. They are fiery hot, sour, pungent, fragrant, sweet- and- sour, and tart. They are crisp, silky and chewy. Flavors may be fresh, the taste of each spice distinct, or married and intensified by months or even years of aging as the textures of the ingredients melt and soften. While Indians eat some pickles (such as the Mixed Vegetable Pickle, below) in relatively large quantities, the pickles are often too intensely flavored to be eaten that way; they’re used in tiny amounts as a spice or condiment to enliven a dish. Indians also use pickles in a way that Americans never do, that is, medicinally, to cure an ailment. Indians love to taste food; they live to taste food. Indians want many layers and many contrasting tastes. No one food can satisfy that hunger except a variety of pickles. I have jars and jars of multi-colored pickles sitting on the kitchen table. One is a tiny onion pickle, picked young and fresh and pickled in rice vinegar, that is common to almost all north Indian homes. Several are pickled chilies: one is made of whole green chilies and is dangerously hot while another, made from habaneros stuffed with spices, is more savory than hot, and a third is made from chopped green chilies soured with lemon. There is a crunchy sweet- and- hot cauliflower, turnip and carrot pickle, a ginger-lime pickle and a gooseberry pickle. These pickles are made from recipes that have been handed down by the women of my family for two to three hundred years. Some of these jars have been maturing for just a few days, others for much longer than that. A jar of lemon pickles made by his family chef at home in India, a jar that has been maturing for 60 years. In India, food is understood to be intimately related to health and medicine. The Ayurveda, the ancient Hindu text that defines the relationship of food, spices, exercise and meditation for the health of the human body, gives recipes for various medicinal foods and elixirs, of which pickles play an important role. I use lemon pickle as it is traditionally used in my native country: to cure queasiness and tummy aches. In my New York household I use pickles the way that wealthier households do in India, as a condiment guaranteed to give plain foods taste. In fact, in India it’s considered rude to ask for pickles if they are not on the table; it suggests that the food isn’t savory enough. Indian homes make several signature pickles, recipes that have been passed down through generations of women. Pickles made the season before are served daily. Aged, well-loved pickles are brought out when someone is sick or when the household is hosting a special meal. With the exception of some pickles that are made with winter produce such as cauliflower, radishes, turnips and carrots, pickles are made in Indian homes in the heat of the summer. Fruits and vegetables are bought from local vendors who sell door to door. Women spend several weeks preparing pickles. The fruits are laid out on terraces on sheets of muslin for several days in the summer sun to dry, or “ripen” and concentrate their flavors. The produce is brought inside every night to protect against dew and laid out again in the morning. The pickles are put up in very large ceramic jars, each about 20 inches tall and 8 inches wide. Once jarred, the pickles are ripened again for several more days in the sun. If you ask an Indian where the best pickles are made, they will name three centers: the Marwari and Baniya trading communities in northern India, the state of Gujerat in western India, and the state of Andhra Bradesh, in southern India. The Marwari and Baniya communities are completely vegetarian and they subsist on pickles and bread. The people of these communities make pickles everyday and their meals include several different types. Pickles that are spiced with fenugreek and fennel and pickled in mustard oil, are likely to be from northern India, as are pickled cauliflower, carrots, turnips and radishes, the so called “winter vegetables” that are grown on the northern plains. Pickles represent a ritual world of food and community in India. Pickling is an ancient art and a part of Hindu spiritual practice: according to the laws of Hindu religion, pickling, or “cooking” foods with sun and air is one of the three acceptable ways to make raw foods palatable. The rituals of pickle making define a certain period of the summer in India when entire households are given over to the task of their making. Traditionally, in small towns, the women join together, spending days outside in the shade of tamarind trees cutting, preparing, and drying the fruits and vegetables. The kids play above in the dense greenery of the trees, eating the green fruit of the tamarind and tossing the seeds onto the ground below. (Stomach aches and tiny tamarind seedlings are evidence of their gluttony.) Play, food, music and storytelling combine to give the season a celebratory mood. Even in urban centers in India today, the time of pickling still invites ritual community and celebration. Women call each other on the phone to organize the making of the pickles or to ask for the gift of a jar of a favorite kind. Life slows a bit, personal connections are made, and thousands of years of ritual is repeated. --Suvir Saran and Stephanie Lyness
  3. achevres

    Cinco de Mayo appetizer

    I have been invited to a Cinco de Mayo party and asked to bring an appetizer for 6. I don't think it has to be Mexican, but I would like to bring something either Mexican or Southwestern in flavor or spirit (or at least South of the border). I don't want to bring salsas or guacamole or anything so predictable. Most of the interesting things I can think of need last minute attention, like fritters or gorditas etc. I like the idea of a shrimp seviche, but it looks messy to eat standing up. Any ideas on presenting a seviche for a cocktail-type party are welcome. I would like something that could be served room temperature and be prepared in advance. It doesn't have to be "authentic," just taste great and suitably impress . Also, I don't have time to experiment. I would like something you have made before. Too much to ask?
  4. mikeczyz

    coconut chutney

    any ideas on how to make it? fresh coconut? what is it ususally served along with? what purpose to chutney's serve? calm down spicy foods? mike
  5. Carlo A. Balistrieri

    Jujube preserves

    On a recent visit to North Carolina I had a great cocktail called a "Hot Date." It was made with jujube preserves (Chinese red dates?) and I've been looking for them ever since--and on line--to no avail. Can someone help with a NYC or mail order source?
  6. Stone

    Ketchup

    Oscar Madison called it "tomato wine." I love it. I love it on everything. I splosh it on my burgers. I plosh it on my vindaloo. I mosh it into my ice cream. I splorge it on my morning cereal. I squeeze it over corn, under towers of steak tartare, around store-bought pastry-puffs of mushroom and crab, and into doughnuts because what's jelly anyway but a misguided attempt at fruit-ketchup. I drench it on broccoli and quench my thirst with it. I've done away with Crest in favor of Heinzing my teeth every morning. 57 varieties for 30 teeth. I've filled my jacuzzi with a delightfully sweet tomotao froth. Some people think ketchup should be banned. That's crazy talk if you ask me. What say we petition the government to declare Ketchup the truly American food (hamburger and frankfurter sound too tuetonic for such an honor).
  7. ANDIE'S ABSOLUTELY ADDICTING BREAD & BUTTER PICKLES Here’s the thing about pickles: if you’ve never made them, they may seem to be an overwhelming (and possibly mysterious) project. Our listener Andie – who has offered some really valuable help to the show several times in the past – has sent this recipe which provides an opportunity to “try your hand” at pickle-making without much effort. Andie suggests that making a small batch, and storing the pickles in the refrigerator (without “processing”) can get you started painlessly. Our Producer Lisa says that the result is so delicious that you won’t be able to keep these pickles on hand - even for the 3-4 months that they’ll safely keep! The basics are slicing the cucumbers and other veggies, tossing them with salt and crushed ice and allowing them to stand for awhile to become extra-crisp. You then make a simple, sweet and spicy syrup, (Andie does this in the microwave), rinse your crisp veggies, put them in a jar, pour the syrup over, and keep them in the refrigerator until they’re “pickled” – turning the jar upside down each day. In about 2 weeks you’ll have pickles – now how much easier could that be? If you are inspired, I hope you’ll try these – and enjoy! MAKES ABOUT 1 QUART. FOR THE PICKLES: 4 to 6 pickling cucumbers (cucumbers should be not much larger than 1 inch in diameter, and 4 to 5 inches long) 1/2 to 3/4 of one, medium size onion. 1/2 red bell pepper. 1/4 cup, pickling salt (coarse kosher salt) 2 quarts, cracked ice water to cover 2 tablespoons, mustard seed. 1 heaping teaspoon, celery seed FOR THE SYRUP: 1 1/2 cups, vinegar *NOTE: Use cider or distilled white vinegar, do not use wine vinegar. 1 1/2 cups, sugar 2 heaping teaspoons, pickling spice mix. PREPARE THE PICKLES: Carefully wash the cucumbers and bell pepper. Slice all vegetables very thin, using a food processor with a narrow slicing blade, or by hand, or using a V-slicer or mandoline. Toss the sliced vegetables together in a glass or crockery bowl large enough to hold twice the volume of the vegetables. Sprinkle the salt over the vegetables, add the cracked ice, toss again to blend all ingredients and add water to just barely cover the vegetables. Place a heavy plate on top of the vegetables to keep them below the top of the liquid. *Set aside for 4 hours. PREPARE THE SYRUP: Place the vinegar, sugar and pickling spices in a 4-quart Pyrex or other microwavable container (the large Pyrex measure works very well) Microwave on high for 15 to 20 minutes. [if a microwave is not available, simmer the syrup in a narrow saucepan on the stovetop, over low heat, for the same length of time.] Allow the syrup to cool. Strain the syrup and discard the spices. ASSEMBLE THE PICKLES: Place one wide-mouth quart canning jar (or two wide-mouth pint jars) with their lids in a pot of water to cover, place over medium heat and bring the water to a simmer (180 degrees). Remove the pot from the heat and allow jar(s) and lid(s) to remain in the hot water until needed. *After the 4 hours are up (crisping the vegetables as described above) pour the vegetables into a large colander and rinse well. The cucumber slices should taste only slightly salty. Return the rinsed vegetables to the bowl, add the mustard seeds and celery seeds and toss well until evenly distributed. Set aside. Return the syrup to the microwave, microwave on high for 8 to 10 minutes [or heat the syrup on the stovetop] until an instant read thermometer shows the temperature of the syrup is 190 to 200 degrees. Place the vegetables into one wide-mouth quart jar, or in 2 wide-mouth pint jars that have been scalded as described above. Pour the syrup over the vegetables, place the lids on the jar or jars, tighten well and place in the refrigerator overnight. The following day, turn the jar upside down - then continue to turn every day for 2 weeks. (This is to insure that the pickles are evenly flavored) After 2 weeks open the jar and taste. The pickles should be ready to eat. Pickles will keep in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 months. ( RG2154 )
  8. Suzanne F

    Green Tomato Jam

    Green Tomato Jam Makes about 8 3/4 cups of jam; about ten 1-cup (8 ounce) jars. This recipe is adapted from the General Foods Consumer Center. 1-3/4 lb green tomatoes 1/2 c lemon juice 7-1/2 c sugar (3-1/4 pounds) 2 pkg (pouches) fruit pectin jell Wash the tomatoes. Grind, and measure 3 cups of tomatoes into a 6- to 8-quart nonreactive pot. Add the lemon juice. Add the sugar and mix thoroughly. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. As soon as it reaches a boil, stir in the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized canning jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of the top. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars. Cover the jars with 2-piece lids and screw the bands tightly. Invert the jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. Let cool for 1 hour, then check seals. Variation: I added some finely minced lemongrass and very finely julienned lime leaf, for a little more "exotic" flavor. Keywords: Intermediate, Vegetables, Condiment ( RG731 )
  9. Chris Amirault

    Inner Beauty Hot Sauce Knock-Off

    Inner Beauty Hot Sauce Knock-Off This is a knock-off version of Chris Schlesinger's legendary Inner Beauty Hot Sauce, the last bottle of which is the subject of a topic here. This version is based on perusal of the ingredients list and on the recipe in Big Flavors Of The Hot Sun by Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby. However, that recipe is uncooked, whereas this one is cooked. I've fiddled around with this pretty extensively and like the balance, which resembles closely, to my tongue, that of the original. You can do the same. For example, some of the ingredients that were on-hand in my house (the palm vinegar, say) might not be in yours, and those could easily be substituted. You also might want to add other ingredients -- pineapple juice, say, or ground cloves -- to tweak it. Make it yours. Inner Beauty is fantastic with fried chicken or fish, dashed into collards, and as a jerk-like marinade base with citrus (orange and lime work well) for just about anything. 15 habanero chiles 1 mango 1 c yellow mustard 1/2 c brown sugar 1/2 c white vinegar 1/2 c palm vinegar 1 T curry powder 1 T cumin 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp allspice 1 T ancho chile powder 3 T salt (or to taste) 1 T black pepper 1/4 c molasses Seed and devein the chiles with gloves on, and tear them into smallish bits. Peel the mango and slice it into chunks -- size and shape don't matter, since you'll be blending it. Add the rest of the ingredients in a sauce pan. Bring the mixture to simmer over medium heat, turn it down to low, and simmer it for an hour or two, stirring now and then. Add water to keep it from scorching. The sauce is done cooking when the mango and chile flesh easily disintegrate under light pressure from your spoon or spatula. Blend with an immersion blender (or, when cool, in a blender) until the sauce is smooth. Keywords: Easy, Condiment, Hot and Spicy, Sauce ( RG2025 )
  10. Sorry to lower the tone, but did anyone catch his TV show last night? Christ is there no end to this mans philanthropy, when he dies they should canonise him at least. Anyway the basis is, Jamie is going to give one of his 'downtrodden, disadvantaged and desolate' trainees the chance to run their own restaurant. So four trainees have to battle it out to see who wins etc etc. Of course the purpose of this venture is not to promote his ever expanding empire and do-gooder image, but to give some poor soul the chance to be happy, successful and a whole person. However a few questions/ points: 1. These 'disadvantaged ' individuals did not seem that bad to me. Ok one had stole a car twice, one had overdone it on the gak, one came from Thailand and the other was an Irish lad ( being Irish seemingly his criteria for disadvantagedness) Hardly the Asbo generation? 2. Prior to his 15 project was it really so hard to become a chef? He kept claiming last night how much he had changed these 'kids' lives by giving them a chance to become a chef! 3. Why did he feel the need to step up the swearing ala Gordon Ramsey? Come on Jamie not really the image you want to portray. Even Ruth Watson was swearing. 4. Who the fuck is Ruth Watson? 5. Why did he feel the need to show his vast fortune of? Driver, mansion, lavish birthday celebrations etc etc? Was it to show the poor people that if they take over this pub they could have all this? 6. Why did the Irish lad's Mum have subtitles when she was speaking English albeit with a bit of an accent? 7 Was it a coincidence that the name of pub was called The Cock? This had to be the most patronising piece of television I have ever seen, well since his last piece of pseudo altruistic nonsense....... Apologies one and all I felt I had to vent my spleen
  11. Last night's balmy skies graced our cocktail hour in the garden of the James Beard House. Apparently there are a lot of Bordeaux Wine Lovers a bout since this sold out event was subscribed by a diverse age group. The only 'difficult' part of the evening was making one's way past the swarm of staff from The Highlawn Pavilion & Manor who were hard at work in the petite kitchen to make each plate picture perfect. The appetizerrs [Frogs Legs w. black garlic, Spoons of Lobster w. mango, shots of spring pea soup w. jamon froth, wagu beef w. leeks and FG torchon] lept off the plates. Perhaps it was the Perrier-Jouet that helped them slide down? As Chef Mitchell Altholz slaved away in the kitchen ad the Knowles dynasty kept a laid back but watchful eye, the rest of us enjoyed this multi-course meal that began w. a plate of assorted crudo and ended with desserts typical of Bordeaux. An oil poached halibut, pheasant w foie gras & truffle & beef w. Bordeaux & blue cheese filled the gap between first and last courses. Michael Giulini of Deutsch & Sons supplied some excellent wines from Chateau Bonnet Rose to Ch Coucheroy Blanc to a Margaux, and a St Emilion. Surely the spirit of James Beard was hovering overhead on this wonderful evening...and me, I was the luckiest, as I got to enjoy all of it!
  12. Honey-Mustard Rotini with Chicken Serves 8 as Main Dish. This is a standby disk that I make whenever I can't decide what else to make. I've made variations with basil in lieu of or in addition to the parsley, adding heavy cream, sour cream or yogurt, adding sun-dried tomatoes, whatever, but at it's base it's a simple, inexpensive, filling dinner. 1 lb Chicken thighs, boned & skins removed, cut into bite-size pieces 1 medium onion, chopped 2 T minced or pressed fresh garlic 1 T olive oil 1/2 c your favorite prepared mustard 1/4 c olive oil 1/4 c honey 1/2 c toasted pine nuts 2 T minced fresh parsley 1/2 c freshly grated Parmesan or other fragrant hard cheese 1 lb rotini or other bite-size pasta, cooked 1. In a skillet, saute chicken, onion & half of garlic in 1 T olive oil until chicken is just cooked. 2. In a bowl, whisk together mustard, 1/4 C olive oil and honey until fully combined. Add pine nuts, parsley, cheese, and chicken mixture; stir to combine. 3. Stir mixture into hot pasta and serve, topping with additional cheese. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner ( RG2055 )
  13. Tataki Kyuuri no Shouga-zuke ( Cucumber pickles with Ginger) Serves 4 as Side. These are a simple cucumber pickle that only need a couple minutes to marinate. Tataki is from the verb to hit or strike and they are called this because the cucumbers (kyuuri) are slightly smashed before marinating in the ginger (shouga) dressing. Try to use Japanese cucumbers if possible, if they are not available then use seedless ones. 3 Japanese cucmbers 1 T grated ginger 1/2 T rice vinegar 3 T soy sauce large pinch of sugar 1. Cut the cucumbers lengthwise into quarters, then cut them in 2 to 3 inch lengths. 2. Place them into a ziploc bag and slightly crush them with the bottom of a pan, you don't want to smash them to a pulp rather you want to just open them up a little so they can marinate faster. Some will be broken. 3 Add the rest of the ingredients to the bag and masssage it gently to mix the ingredients. 4. Let it sit for about 5 minutes then serve. Keywords: Appetizer, Japanese, Side, Vegan, Easy ( RG1041 )
  14. lperry

    Jam and preserves

    The fruit has been excellent this year and I find my shelves overflowing with jams and preserves. I have enough for the gifts that I usually give, so I'm trying to come up with other ways to use up my supply. I've got mango/lime, pineapple/ginger, cherry, mayhaw, pear/ginger, and peach. I don't use added pectin, so everything is of fairly soft consistency. So far I've come up with the following ideas: 1. Fill a cake or sandwich cookies 2. Mix into a plain ice cream base (will this work?) 3. Eat biscuits and jam for breakfast every morning for the rest of my life (not a bad notion) Any suggestions would be appreciated. It's only July and I have always had a strange compulsion to put food in jars all summer long. Please help! Thanks, Linda
  15. Vikas Khanna

    Mango Chutney with Ginger and Garlic

    Mango Chutney with Ginger and Garlic Serves 2 as Side. Mango Chutney is become one of the favorite condiment in Indian restaurants all over U.S. Now you can make this chutney with this simple recipe and also create your own versions by adding your favorite ingredients. 6 firm half-ripe mangoes, peeled and thinly sliced 1 c cider vinegar 1 c packed light brown sugar 2 T minced garlic 1 2-inch fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 1 T cayenne pepper salt and freshly ground pepper In a large skillet bring all the ingredients to boil, over medium heat. Reduce the heat to low, simmer for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring constantly from sticking to the bottom of the skillet. Remove from heat and let the chutney cool before serving. Always keep it refrigerated. Keywords: Side, Fruit, Easy, Condiment, Indian ( RG1240 )
  16. I am canning pickles today and would like to do some with asian flavors. I have in mind to add a few drops of sesame oil for flavor to one of my brines. Is this O.K. or will the oil throw off the preserving factor?
  17. Holly Moore

    Southern Preserves

    Not that the issue of the South and butter has been explained I'm turning my attention to fruit preserves, Southern style. Unlike the preserves I've grown up on, a lumpy sweet slurry that easily spreads on toast. Jack McDavid, at Jack's Firehouse in Philadelphia, first introduced me to what I assume is the Southern approach to preserves - a thin sweet syrup with large chunks of fruit. Since then I've seen such preserves throughout the South, most recently at Monell's in Nashville. The chunks of fruit are indeed tasty. I spoon them out of the syrup and gently balance them on a biscuit half. Sometimes they don't full out en route to my mouth, staining my shirt. But the syrup pretty much goes to waste. What am I not getting? What's the proper way to apply Southern style preserves? Why are they so, what we Yankees would call, watery?
  18. I'm planning a bbq in a couple of weeks where I'll be serving homemade Vietnamese coffee ice cream along with some sort of ginger cookies. I'm trying to think of a tasty and unique way to incorporate Sriracha in maybe a caramel sauce, or a candied nut...something of that nature that can go over the ice cream. Any ideas or experience with this?
  19. Renee K

    Jelly Roll Sponge I

    Jelly Roll Sponge I 200 g eggs 120 g caster (superfine) sugar 125 g cake flour 1/2 tsp baking powder 40 g oil sift flour and baking powder together twice whisk egg whites till foamy, and gradually add the sugar. at soft peaks, add the yolks gradually and continue whisking to ribbon stage fold in the dry ingredients, followed by the oil pour into 28cm x 36cm (11 x 14 inch) or 25 x 36cm (10 x 14 inch) swiss roll pan bake at 200C (ummm... I think that's about 400F??) for about 8-10 minutes, depending on oven. Do not overbake. unmould immediately onto a wire rack once cool, spread with filling and roll up Keywords: Dessert, Cake ( RG1810 )
  20. bleudauvergne

    Crepes - Jambon cru aux champignons

    Crepes - Jambon cru aux champignons Serves 6 as Main Dishor 12 as Appetizer. This crepe recipe features the standard white flour batter. It brings forward the salty goodness of cured ham, complimented by fresh mushrooms and simple bechamel. Comfort food. 250 g flour type 55 or US all purpose 2 eggs 50 cl milk 50 cl water butter for the crepe pan For the crepe stuffing: 25 g butter 3 thick slices of cured ham, jambon de savoie, parma, etc. 250 g white mushrroms (champignons de Paris) For the Bechamel: 40 g flour type fluide 45 or US all pupose 40 g butter 40 cl milk nutmeg salt fresh ground black pepper 1) Make the batter. Sift the flour into a bowl. put the eggs into a well inthe center of the flour, and incorporate into the flour. Add the milk and the water a little at a time, whisking constantly until it is smooth and liquidy. Add salt and pepper. Set aside to rest for at least 2 hours. 2) During that time, prepare the bechamel. Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add the flour all at once and incorporate into melted butter, stir constantly over medium low heat for 5 minutes, without coloring. Add the milk all at once and stir in, bring back to a simmer. Add the m\nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Keep warm. 3) Sliver the ham finely. Slice the mushrooms thin, and saute them in the 25 grams of butter. Add the ham to and toss with the mushrooms briefly, and fold the mixure into the bechamel. Rectify the seasoning. Set aside. 4) Heat a serving platter in the oven to keep the crepes warm once you've assembled them (90C/200F). Cook the crepes by thinly spreading the batter over the surface of a hot buttered crepe pan. (throw away or eat the first one because the first one is always a little strange). Once it's brown underneath, spread the filling in the center of the crepe, and roll it up. Place the assembled crepes on the serving platter and keep warm until you serve them Keywords: Appetizer, Brunch, Main Dish, Lunch, Easy, Dinner, Pork, French ( RG947 )
  21. Okay, here is what we had: Moutarde Violette (recette Charentaise) Nice mellow mustard that would be tasty with crackers and cheese. The sweetness of the wine mellows out the mustard seed really well. Moutard de Truffe (Tubissime) OMG, that is not okay! Two tastes that came together as something you would shoot at a fancy fraternity party, as a dare. Moutard au Miel (Champ's) Yummy, a discernible amount of honey created a delicious classic pairing. (While I didn't have time to bring it, the honey mustard from Les Abilles is amazing. It features a spike of horseradish that gives it another dimension). Moutard de Picard (Champ's) I felt the cider didn't add anything to the taste. The flavor was as if plain whole grain had cider vinegar dumped into the batch. Moutard au Vin Charentais Nice whole grain look, but tasted of dust and cider. Verjus et Miel (Maille) Nothing special, tasted of your basic brown mustard. Horshradish (Maille) I LOVE horseradish and assumed I would love this mustard. Unfortunately this mustard tasted nothing of the bite or tang of horseradish and instead offered only little pickled nuggets of the root. Forte de Dijon (Monoprix) The strongest of the Dijons. A bit too powerful for most applications. Unless of course you want to clear your sinuses instantly. French's ballpark Oh French's, this instantly takes me back to pulling those nasty encrusted udders at Fenway. How can I say anything bad about something so charged with good memories. French's Dijon So either this one had gone bad, or just IS really bad. Tastes of flour and flowers, with hints of cardboard thrown in. The texture was pasty to boot. Moutarde de Dijon (Champ's) Classic Dijon taste without being overwhelming like the one from Monoprix. Moutarde de Meaux (Pommery) Big bits of whole grain but with a smooth taste that develops in the mouth. Hints of Champagne left a nice finish that felt as though it would cut through a fatty steak really well. For me the best of the lot were the Champ's au Miel and Dijon, both of which represented the best of their respective genres. My other favorite was the moutarde de Meaux which was both original and delicious. The French's Dijon and the moutarde de Truffe should be labeled as "not meant for consumption". The French's ballpark gets high scores for nostalgia. Here is a link to the labels and the pretzels: Mustard Gallery
  22. Yah, yah, I'm sick, it's supposedly end stage cancer, I'm going through total skin electron beam radiation, blahdiblah blah... Here's the important thing. I NEED a decent pickle. I do not want to meet the end (or face the fight against an end) without having savored, at least once more, a delicious-perfectly pickled-puckery-garlicky-yet-not-overpoweringly-so cucumber, even if it isn't of my own manufacture. I have NO energy. I AM fussy about my pickles. The plebian yet enjoyable BaTampte isn't going to cut is this time. Where can I send a well meaning friend in the Freehold area to acquire this lovely for me? I prefer a more than slightly green pickle, a well pickled, but still light and crisp pickle, where the flesh hasn't greened as yet. Garlic is a must. Vinegar is a no no. Brine is the all important base. Can any of you NJ experts assist me? My friend is ready for action at any time.
  23. helenjp

    Nuka-zuke Ricebran pickles

    Nuka-zuke Ricebran pickles Bags of dry seasoned nuka-doko (ricebran pickling bed) mix are available, and vary in quality. Boxes of ready matured wet mixes are usually better quality. It isn't hard to make your own, but it takes a week or two (depending on temperature/season) to mature. It's easiest to start in spring, when temperatures are warm but not hot, and the pickle bed matures just as the first summer vegetables become available. Pickling bed 2 kg rice bran 300 g coarse natural salt (15% of weight of ricebran) 2 l water, boiled and cooled (roughly equal weight with ricebran) Additives strip of dried kelp, wiped clean 10 dried chile peppers (adjust to taste) 3 pickled sansho berries Japanese type not Chinese Dry ground mustard, a handful, slows fermentation Vegetables to pickle eggplants, halved or quarted whole cucumbers bell peppers chunks of cabbage daikon (Japanese radish) in quarters carrot sticks Boil water and allow to cool. You can boil the salt with the water if you like. Use fresh ricebran, and use as soon as possible after purchase so that the oils do not become rancid. Some people like to dry-roast the ricebran over a gentle heat in a wok, stirring constantly. Allow to cool to room temperature. Mix water, salt, and rice bran. Add enough water so that the mixture forms a ball when squeezed, but remains loose and crumbly in the bowl. Additives can be added now or after maturing for a couple of weeks. Transfer bran mixture to a lidded container, and press some vegetables into the pickle bed. As long as they are clean, almost anything will do at this stage -- the first round or two of pickles are normally thrown out. Set container aside in a fairly dark, cool, place. You MUST mix thoroughly every day, up to 3 times daily in hot weather. If this is impossible, move the pickle bed to a plastic bag and "hibernate" it in the fridge. I suspect it would freeze OK, but have not tried it. Vegetables are ready when soft (or for carrot, when somewhat soft). Always take pickled veg out, wash or wipe clean, and store in the refrigerator if not wanted immediately - old pickles will quickly invite bad bacteria or excessive sourness. If you pickle a lot of watery vegetables such as cucumbers, remember that the pickle bed is losing salt, and as salt levels drop, fermentation and lactic acids will increase. Add a sprinkle of salt and dry mustard every time you remove vegetables in this case, and add more rice bran (and proportional amount of salt) if the bed becomes sloppy. You can drain off excess liquid, but this tends to affect the flavor of the pickle bed. Don't overdo the mustard - pickles should not taste bitter or hot. Keywords: Japanese ( RG1089 )
  24. joey madison

    Joe's Jambalaya

    Joe's Jambalaya Serves 4 as Main Dish. When most people think of Jambalaya, they generally think of a dish that includes rice, tomatoes, and various meats. This recipe is different -- a modern interpretation of an old favorite -- because it follows a more northern Louisiana tradition and omits the tomatoes. I think it makes the dish more elegant and subtle. It refridgerates reasonably well, and I like to serve it with a simple Italian country loaf of bread. It's a fairly flexible recipe, so feel free to experiment. 1 whole chicken breast 2 links of andouille sausage 1 c shrimp or other seafood (optional) 1 c long grain white rice 1 c water 1 c dry white wine 1 c chicken stock (preferably homemade) 1 large red bell pepper 2 ribs of celery 1 hot pepper of your choice (optional) 1 tsp Tabasco (or more) 2 T unsalted butter T fresh Italian parsley 1 tsp dried thyme salt and pepper to taste Dice the chicken breast into 1 inch cubes. Salt and pepper the chicken to taste. Heat a large dutch oven over a medium flame. Add the butter, and when it begins to foam, at the chicken to the pot. Brown slightly, but be sure not to over cook. Add the bell peppers and celery, coarsely diced, and stir for a minute. Then add the rice. While your performing the above tasks, bring the wine, water and stock to a bare boil in another pot. Add the liquid mixture to the dutch oven, along with the thyme, tabasco, and parsley. Add the sausage, cut into 1/4 inch slices to the same pot. If desired add a diced jalapeno, habanero, thai pepper, or whatever. Simmmer covered for 20-25 minutes or until the rice is softened but not pastey. If desired you can add shrimp or other seafood a few minutes before serving. Careful not to overcook the seafood. Taste and add additional salt if needed. Garnish with choped fresh parsley sprigs. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner, Hot and Spicy, American, Lunch, Pork, Fish, Rice ( RG1225 )
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