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  1. OK. Here's a recipe I've been noodling around with for pickled onions... it's pretty much the same recipe that you'd use for bread & butter pickles, but without the cucumbers and other stuff ... just onions. I've found that frozen pearl onions work just fine for this recipe, so you can make them pretty much any time of the year. You can use fresh pearl onions, but they require peeling, and the ones I find in the produce aisle tend to be a little too large for my liking, since the syrup doesn't seem to permeate them as well. When I make them, I put them in jars, and can them up. They make pretty good gifts, too, since the syrup ends up a yummy looking golden color. A friend told me they're excellent snack food, but I serve them just like I'd serve a relish or a chutney. 1/4 c. salt 2 c light brown sugar 1/2 t tumeric * 1/4 t cloves * 1 T mustard seed * 1 t celery seed * 1 or 2 hot chili peppers (optional) 2 c white vinegar 2 lbs. fresh pearl onions, peeled, or 4 packages frozen Combine everything in a pot except the onions and slowly bring to a boil. Simmer for 5 minutes. Strain out the spices, and return the syrup to the pot. (You can leave the spices in for more zing as they age, but I strain them out because they make eating kind of clumsy later on.) Add in the onions, and return the mixture back to just below the boiling point. Spoon into sterilized mason jars, and add a clove or two (and a hot pepper or two, if you want), and leave a 1/4" headspace... process the jars in boiling water for 15 minutes if you want them to keep more than a week or two. If you decide to serve them up fresh, best to let them steep, covered, in the liquid for at least day or so in the fridge (I'm guessing). * note: you can replace all of these items with a prepared pickling spice mixture if you want. Penzey's makes a really good one that I've used with good success. Also, if you want to use fresh pearl onions, just trim off the root end, and cut a shallow x where the root was, and dunk them in boiling water for a a minute or two -- the papery skins will slip right off. I've also tried making this recipe with cider vinegar, but it added an off flavor that I didn't care for.
  2. Just came across this chocolate cake and was wondering if anyone has tried it or heard of it. Something tells me it might work well, but I want to know what your opinions are before I experiment. Thanks!
  3. dvs

    Mustard Greens

    Our mustard greens are ready for dinner tonight! any one have a good recipe? i'm serving w/ pork chop milanese... if that helps! tia!
  4. Of late one of my favorite sandwich fixin's is Hellman's Mayonnaise mixed with an Indian Pickle. I'm speaking of the Indian condiment, usually lime or mango pickle. You know, the stuff that smells like Kiwi Shoe Polish, you either love it or hate it. It's always too chunky to spread on a sandwich so I often take a jar and puree it a bit for convenience. Mixed with the Hellman's it has quickly become a favorite on sandwiches made with turkey, chicken, pheasant, any kind of white meat and sometimes even leftover hanger steak. Anyone care to offer up their favorite "bastard condiment"?
  5. A while ago, to learn the ins and outs of Horseradish, I began making my own mustard. I have managed some really really good varieties, (one with black mustard seeds, rice-wine vinegar, horseradish and Kabocha squash) and some really god awful ones too. I recall that my grandmother used to make her own ketchup too. it wasn't all that good. has anyone made their own condiments before? care to share experiences?
  6. I mashed 10 cups of whole blackberries with two cups of sugar and added three packages of certo. I didn't cook this as I plan to freeze it. After refrigeration I checked the viscosity and it did not thicken any more. It's fine for toast and pancakes but it would be nicer to have a thicker jam without adding extra sugar and certo. Any suggestions from the experts?
  7. Sour Tomatillo Achar Made this one up from a recipe for lemons. It really works for tomatilloes. A unique spice mix, and really sour for a 'different' type of pickle, or achar. It is based on a Marwari recipe - from the arid north-western part of India. Tomatilloes are not used in India (or at least not much) but are quite productive plants in my garden while lemons or other sour fruits are not possible to grow here. No vinegar or lemon juice is used, because tomatilloes are very acidic and don't need any extra. Ingredients 3 lbs tomatilloes husks removed and quartered 1/4 cup salt 1 Tbs black mustard seeds 2 star anise buds 10 dried chilies (I used very hot yellow peppers) 1 tsp fenugreek seeds 2 inch ginger (ground to a paste) 2 TBL dark brown sugar 1/2 cup sugar 1. In a large bowl, put the tomatilloes and sprinkle salt over them. Cover it and leave for a day, mixing occasionally. 2. Next day drain the tomatilloes. 3. Dry roast the star anise (put in first as these take longer, the black mustard, and the chilie pods (add last and barely brown in places). Cool. 4. Grind the roasted spices with the fenugreek and put aside. 5. Add tomatilloes, ginger, sugars, and everything else to a large pan and heat to boiling. 6. Cook till fully hot and boiling. 7. Fill half-pint jars and seal.
  8. Sweet Eggplant Pickle This is an Indian pickle, some would call a chutney, that I made up from several sources and my own tastes. It is based it on my favorite sweet brinjal (eggplant here in the US) pickle available commercially. It has onion and garlic, which are often omitted in some recipes due to dietary restrictions of some religious orders. It also has dates which I added on my own based on another pickle I love. I also used olive oil as mustard oil is not available and I like it's taste in these pickles. Use other oils if you like. This has more spices than the commercial type - and I think it's superior. I avoided black mustard seed, fenugreek, and cumin because almost all other pickles use these and they start to taste the same. One recipe from Andhra Pradesh used neither and I followed it a little. It's wonderful with all sorts of Indian foods - and also used for many other dishes, especially appetizers. SPICE MIX (Masala) 4 Tbs coriander seeds 3 hot chilies (I used a very hot Habanero type, so use more if you use others) 18 cardamom pods 2 inches cinnamon 24 cloves 1 1/2 Tbs peppercorns MAIN INGREDIENTS 1 cups olive oil 4 inches fresh ginger, minced fine, about 1/2 cup 6 cloves garlic, minced 1 large onion finely chopped 3 lb eggplant, diced, 1/4 inch cubes 1/2 lb chopped dates 1 1/2 tsp turmeric powder 2 cups rice vinegar (4.3 percent acidity or more) 2 cups brown sugar 2 Tbs salt 2 tsp citric acid Spice Mix (Masala) 1. Dry roast half the coriander seeds in a pan till they begin to brown slightly and become fragrant - do not burn. Cool. 2. Put roasted and raw coriander seeds and all the other spices in a spice mill and grind till quite fine, or use a mortar and pestle. Put aside. Main Pickle 1. Heat half the oil and fry ginger till slightly browned, slowly. 2. Add garlic, onion, and half the salt and fry slowly till these begin to brown a bit too. 3. Add eggplant, turmeric, and spice mix (Masala) and combine well. Fry for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. 4. Add rest of ingredients, including rest of the salt and olive oil and heat slowly to a boil. 5. Boil for about 5 minutes. Add a little water if too thick - it should be nearly covered with liquid, but not quite - it will thin upon cooking so wait to add the water till heated through. 6. Bottle in sterilized jars and seal according to your local pickling instructions. This recipe will be sufficiently acidic.
  9. Anyone know of a place to get real, fermented pickles in Tampa? Or real sauerkraut?
  10. So excited that our Seattle Seahawks are in the Super Bowl this year! What are people making? Any Seahawk fans planning a Seattle-inspired menu? One that doesn't involve any last minute cooking? I'm making sourdough bread and bacon/onion jam to go with someone's beef tenderloin. To bring in some Seattle touches, we'll have smoked salmon, a Northwest berry cobbler. And as a nod to Seahawk colors: blue corn chips and guacamole. There'll be IPAs of course (Seattle's a very hopped up city)but I'm also trying to come up with a clever cocktail - or hawktail (I've thought of making blue rock candy to use as a sugar rim on a sage margarita).
  11. Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. For the balchao paste you will need: > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder > 1 tsp peppercorn > 6 garlic cloves > 1/2 tsp cloves > 1 inch cinnamon stick > Vinegar First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
  12. One of my local supermarkets recently installed a sesame seed pressing facility and is now producing sesame oil and sesame paste. Their equipment toasts and extracts the oil and the residue is turned into the paste. Of course, I bought some of each. I have only used the oil so far. It tastes and smells more intensely than any I have bought before. The aroma also seems to last longer in a dish. These are the white seed versions. They also do black seed oil and paste which I haven't bought yet. Neither has any brand label - only a bar code on the back so that the check-out staff can deal with it. I am sorely tempted to try this recipe from Carolyn Philips for celtuce with sesame oil, paste and seeds. I'll let you know how I get on with this or any other recipe. Suggestions welcome, as always.
  13. This is Good! Much better (IMO) than the more widely recognized Huy Fong "rooster sauce." Not as sweet, missing the chemical additives, with a bit of smokiness and packed in glass rather than plastic. My new standard sriracha sauce. We combined our philosophy of using fresh, locally sourced ingredients with the age-old craft of fermentation. We age our secret pepper mash in whiskey barrels for between one and three months. The sriracha takes on complex flavors from the oak barrels and the natural fermentation process. Absolutely no preservatives or additives go into our sriracha. Each bottle is handcrafted and made in small batches to ensure the most intense flavors. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpibEm0vFSU
  14. Thanks to eGullet friend, Deryn, I now am equipped to cook my first Thai curry (I hope.) Yesterday I stopped at our go-to Asian grocery store and stocked up on Thai specialities. I have pretty much all the ingredients I need such as: lemongrass, kaffir leaves, turmeric root, palm sugar, coconut cream, seeds of a variety of spices, rice noodles, tamarind, long skinny eggplant, etc, etc, and etc. I already cook some Indian, Arabic, Mexican and Chinese so I have a good variety of ingredients for these on hand. I could spend three hours now googling Thai curry recipes and come away confused about where to start. Please, someone take pity on me and supply me with a starter's type of curry. (No seafood please and thank you.) My thanks for any and all help.
  15. For those folk who have access to a fig tree or two, here is a recipe for Green Fig Preserve inherited from my fathers recipes. The resulting product is magic on buttered toast and with cheese. The figs must be picked before they ripen and soften. Whole Green Fig Preserve Ingredients: 100 green figs 2 tablespoons bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) 3.4 litres water Method: Scrub the figs and cut a cross into the end opposite the stalk. Mix the water and bicarbonate of soda and soak the figs overnight. Remove from the water and weigh the figs, recording the weight. Place into clean boiling water and boil for 15 minutes or until just soft. Drain and then dry the figs well, removing excess water. Syrup: For each 500g figs or part thereof, mix 500ml water with 500g sugar. Boil the syrup until it just starts to thicken. Add the figs and boil until the syrup is thick. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice for each 250g figs and just bring to the boil again before removing from the heat and letting cool. Bottle the figs and cover with the syrup. Note 1: If the syrup froths whilst boiling, add a small lump of butter. Note 2: A small stick of ginger can be added during the boiling process to add a slightly different flavour.
  16. Salsa Para Enchiladas 3 ancho chiles 2 New Mexico chiles 2 chipotle chiles 1 clove garlic, sliced 2 TB flour 2 TB vegetable oil 1 tsp vinegar ¾ tsp salt ¼ tsp dried oregano 2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
  17. I am currently making some hummos types of spreads and have been making them in a vitamix. The vitamix is getting way too small so I bought a 23 quart robot coupe and it's too slow and will not emulsify like the vitamix. I've been forced to do part of the process in a vitamix and part in the robot coupe but it's so inefficient. Anyone out there know of a faster food processor that will emulsify large batches of food. I've looked at colloidal mills but they are too expensive, but really cool. One of my spreads is an almond+cilantro pesto that is sooooo delicious I usually make about 14 half lb. containers and sell out at markets around NYC pretty quickly. I'm looking to wholesale these soon so need to make a lot more. thanks
  18. A friend recently gifted me with a small jar of this incredible Bomba Calabrese. I thought I'd died and gone to spicy heaven. :wub: This particular brand is made by Gigi and is a product of Italy. The ingredients are: eggplant, pepper, hot chili peppers, mushrooms, artichokes, sunflower oil, olive oil, spices and salt. It is also not in chunks or pieces, but is easily spreadable. I found a few recipes for Bomba Calabrese online, but would like to try one that someone from eG recommends if possible. Barring that, I will make one of the found recipes and blenderize it perhaps. And also try to locate the product locally. I've contacted the distributor but not heard back yet. Thanks for any help.
  19. In my long years of life, never before have I had or made a curried soup. I found a recipe which appealed to me in a free vegetarian magazine distributed by our local bulk and health food store: Alive . I bring it home to read every time I go in there, although mostly to see what recipes might appeal to me...and most don't I have to admit. It's not that I don't like vegetarian food, which I do, but this is just a tad 'too' healthy for me usually. But this recipe was for a "Spicy Thai Yam and Lentil Soup" and I made it for lunch today. I have to admit that I did add shredded pork leftover from the last Puerco Pibil. If the recipe is traditionally Thai I have no idea, but adding pork from the Yucatan region certainly did not add to its authenticity. It was a huge success and now I am definitely in the market for curried soup recipes. All regional cuisines are welcome. Just found the recipe online: http://www.alive.com/recipes/view/1563/spicy_thai_yam_and_lentil_soup
  20. Pannukakku has become a new favorite in the McAuley household. (LCBO Food & Wine, winter season 2016). We've been using Maple Syrup...made with DH's help in a local sugar shack...but the recipe actually calls for birch syrup. Does anyone know where to buy it in Ontario? Any grocery stores carry it? Specialty stores? Toronto? What about in the Cambridge/Kitchener/Waterloo area? Thanks.
  21. There is a big Sriracha thread already, but I'd like to ask about a more specific application. For me, I think the best recommendation from that thread is sriracha on scrambled eggs. From that, I find that like to dot my eggs with sriracha, so it occurred to me that a spherified caviar form could be cool way to add a visual element to the introduction of novices to the practice. I read all the spherification threads with interest, but really have never had the desire to experiment with all the forms. But this application, I feel, is one I really want to do. So, for those so versed, what is the proper path to Sriracha Caviar?
  22. Browsing a "diet" site to see what was on the horizon I stumbled on these olives that former (?) Iron Chef) Cat Cora is marketing. Well maybe it will get non olive eaters to open their minds? Anyone seen these?
  23. Hi there, I'm brand new to posting here and pickling at home, so forgive me if this is the wrong place for a couple questions. I've just decided to make some refrigerator pickled carrots, cukes and okra (too scared to approach canning yet) and I've found a lot of conflicting information on the internet about safety issues. I boiled roughly a 1:1 ratio of water/vinegar and about a tablespoon of kosher salt for every 2 cups of liquid, and added some dill, garlic, hot peppers and filled some tupperware containers with the brine. One concern I had is using garlic - I read it lowers the acidity of the solution and can cause botulism, so should I have used more vinegar or salt in the ratio? And is there a standard vinegar/water/salt ratio that is preferred? I also can't seem to get all the veggies completely submerged in the brine even with it filled to the top and spilling out the sides when I put the lid on. The okra in particular likes to stick its stems out. Is this unsafe and how do I get them to stay down under? Sorry, I know this is cooking 101 on a phd level forum, but that's why I couldn't resist asking here. Thanks!
  24. In this topic on sweet potato salad, Jaymes said (about mayonnaise): I have to disagree: while some cooks here in Atlanta use it, most that I know prefer Hellman's. I certainly do. Duke's is oddly sweet -- halfway to Miracle Whip, in my opinion -- and I can pick it out immediately in things like tuna or potato salad when it's used. If I were faced with the choice of Duke's or nothing on a sandwich, I think I'd have to choose the latter. Am I missing something? Do people really like Duke's? Are there other brands worth trying?
  25. Hi, I am making Southwest Grilled Shrimp for Memorial Day tomorrow and I was wondering if anyone had suggestions for a good dipping sauce to pair with it? The shrimp uses a McCormick Perfect Pinch Southwest Spice, Garlic, Olive Oil, Red Wine Vinegar, Brown Sugar ect. It is a slightly spicy grilled shrimp that is great! I was thinking maybe a Russian Dressing Dipping sauce would be good, but I have never made that before. I would love any suggestions.
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