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Found 568 results

  1. One of my local supermarkets recently installed a sesame seed pressing facility and is now producing sesame oil and sesame paste. Their equipment toasts and extracts the oil and the residue is turned into the paste. Of course, I bought some of each. I have only used the oil so far. It tastes and smells more intensely than any I have bought before. The aroma also seems to last longer in a dish. These are the white seed versions. They also do black seed oil and paste which I haven't bought yet. Neither has any brand label - only a bar code on the back so that the check-out staff can deal with it. I am sorely tempted to try this recipe from Carolyn Philips for celtuce with sesame oil, paste and seeds. I'll let you know how I get on with this or any other recipe. Suggestions welcome, as always.
  2. Making Soy Sauce At Home

    Retirement can do strange things to people I have an uncle who has always been a bit of DIY freak. As he and my aunt get older - they are becoming more and more careful of what kind of food they eat. Now that that they don't have growing kids to feed - they try to eat as much organic food as possible and grow alot it themselves. News reports out of HK last year detailed alot of the lack of quality controls in foods produced in China - so they decided to start making their own soy sauce. I wanted to provide a little update as to how this is done - and I was surprised that it was not as hard as you might think - just a little time and care. My uncle remembers growing up in post war Hong Kong when food was scarce and making ends meet was not easy. The war had left my grandmother virtually broke (from bribing officials to keep her kids safe), widowed, and still having to find a way to feed 8 kids. One easy source of protein was to make miso at home - fermented soy beans that was cooked with a little pickled plum and rock sugar. My uncle said it seemd like the most delicous food at the time. Making soy sauce is simply removing the liquid that the soy beans are fermented in. They still end up with miso that they use as a condiment for cooking things like fish and pork - it gives a plumlike sourness . Now in Vancouver - we don't get as much sun as we would like - so the fermeted soy mash does not cook in the sun for as long as it should - so there is more acidity in it then you would find in industrial soy. Still - its pretty good. Dried organic soy beans are cooked till they are soft and fall apart into a meal when squeezed between your fingers. The soy beans are mixed with flour - ratio that my uncle uses is 16 oz of soy beans (dry weight) is mixed with 12 oz of flour. The beans and flour is kneaded together to make a loaf. My uncle says that from what he's seen, alot of industrial producers skip this step. The loaf is then cut up into disks - and the whole basket is wrapped in layers of towels to promote mold growth. The mold growth part takes about a week - I will take some pictures then if the mold takes hold like it should. The saltiness for the soy sauce will come later when the fremented disks are soaked in a brine that contains 8 oz of salt. It's funny - the salt water has been prepared for a few weeks now. Large containers sitting out in the sun (under plexiglass). I actually don't understand why this needs to be done - but my uncle says that my grandmother would always let the sun cook out the water - sometimes for a whole month. Perhaps this was a way to remove impurities - when tap water was not so safe - and nowadays, it may be good to let some of the chemicals used to treat water, evaporate off. Vancouver is notorious for its use of cholrine. Hopefully the mold will take hold and I will have new pictures soon. BTW - I have no idea what kind of mold takes hold and how my uncle ensures that it is not some killer strain. So - that's my attempt at a legal disclaimer.
  3. As far as I can tell -- and, believe me, I've been working hard to disprove what I'm about to say -- this is the very last bottle of Inner Beauty Real Hot Sauce on the planet: I became a fan of Inner Beauty two decades ago, when Chris Schlesinger brought his grillin' and BBQin' to Cambridge MA at East Coast Grill. After a while, this legendary hot sauce (mustard-based, with fruit, spices, and habaneros) started appearing in grocery stores throughout NE and became a big hit on the burgeoning hot sauce circuit. It was my go-to hot sauce, and I probably went through a bottle every couple of months during the heyday. But then, for reasons that I've never understood (nor, honestly, been told), Schlesinger stopped making the stuff. It started disappearing from market shelves, so in the early oughts I bought all I could find and hoarded it. Well, until I ate it all, too quickly. See, I was confident that I'd find little caches here and there if I looked hard enough, but for two years I came up empty. I also tried making it based on some recipes floating around, but, well, it's not the same. I gave up hope. Two years ago, while on a trip to visit family in -- of all places -- Bisbee, Arizona, we ambled into a gift store to get a few cold Cokes on a blistering July afternoon. Lurking on the shelves of that tiny store, next to gew-gaws and bric-a-brac, were the last two bottles of Inner Beauty in the world. It took me nearly two years to make my way through the first bottle, and I'm now into the second, and last. I don't know how to think about it. How do you eat the very last of something in the world, something you've treasured for most of your adult life? Do you have little dribs and drabs, spread out over years? Or do you consume it with verve and pleasure, the way it was meant to be enjoyed? The whole concept puts me in an existential dilemma that I have faced, largely, with confusion. Has anyone had a dilemma like this themselves -- or are you in one now? What did -- do -- you do?
  4. I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious. In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste. Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes. In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds. Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute. Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey). Fry until golden, another minute or so. Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. Lower the heat and add the blender contents. Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency. Ta da !
  5. Wet spice/curry paste grinders

    I'm thinking of buying a wet spice/curry paste grinder. Any ideas on what brands are the best? Premier super-g, Preethi ??
  6. Recently I had my first sampling of Rosie's lime marmalade, which goes surprisingly well with peanut butter in a PB&J sandwich. And now I have an orange and ginger marmalade, and a peach and pineapple jam to look forward to. And there is the remains of a jar of pumpkin and pecan butter from earlier last year -- I had picked it up from a Food Emporium and used it quite a bit for a while, but eventually forgot about it, so now it sits all forlorn in the middle of the first shelf of my refrigerator. What are your favorite jams/jellies/preserves/conserves/fruit butters and pastes, and what uses do you use them for besides sandwiches, ice cream sauce and glazes for ham? Has anyone ever had a lemon marmalade? A tomato and jalapeno jam? Plum preserves? Anything out of the ordinary beyond the usual? SA
  7. How to make a Pennstation Honey Mustard?

    Pennstation's Honey Mustard taste so good, but they don't sell it in stores like Big Boy Frisch's sells their tartar sauce. I am assuming they buy it in bulk from a certain name brand. Does anyone know what that brand is or at least a similar Honey Mustard recipe?
  8. Tomato Chutney

    Tomato Chutney I have missed this chutney for the longest of time. Growing up in Delhi, my sisters best friend in school was from the South. (Andhra Pradesh to be precise. Andhra is most famous for their pickles and chutneys). Her mother would make the best tomato chutney. A couple of years ago, experimenting with some really ripe tomatoes and relying on my memory, I came up with the recipe. It really tastes like Durgas mothers recipe. I now make it all the time. And in fact, when tomatoes are in season and ripe and bursting with flavor and juice, I make a lot of this chutney, can it and give it out as gifts to friends when visiting them. It is a fiery chutney for most palates. But those that are familiar with Andhra pickles and chutneys will find it just average. I love the chutney with fenugreek seeds, they add a slight bitterness to the chutney that I love. If you are not a fan of bitter tastes, avoid using it. 8 pounds very ripe beefsteak tomatoes, chopped finely 1 1/2 cup canola oil 40 fresh curry leaves 16 whole dried red chiles 2 tablespoon mustard seeds 1 tablespoon cumin seeds 1/4 teaspoon fenugreek seeds, optional 1/3 cup sugar 2 tablespoon cayenne (half if you want a milder chutney) 2 tablespoon coriander seed powder 1 tablespoon paprika 1 tablespoon sambhaar powder 2 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 teaspoon asafetida 1 6 oz. can of tomato paste 3 tablespoon salt, or more to taste 1. Pour the oil in a large sauce pot, enough to hold the tomatoes and then some. It is important that the pot be deep, as the chutney will simmer a long while and will splatter otherwise all over your stove and counter. 2. Measure out all the dried spices other than the asafetida into a bowl and set aside. 3. In the oil add the curry leaves, whole red chiles, mustard seeds, cumin seeds and fenugreek seeds if using. Fry over a medium high flame for 3 minutes or until the chiles are a nice dark color and the cumin are a nice golden brown. 4. Now add the asafetida and fry for half a minute. Add the dried spices and fry for barely half a minute and add the chopped tomatoes. Add the salt and sugar. Stir well and cook on this medium high flame for an hour and a half or until the oil has separated and the chutney begins to stick to the bottom of the pan. 5. Fill the chutney into 10 sterilized half-pint jars and process as per manufacturers instructions for 20 minutes. 6. Cool, check for seal, label and store.
  9. Casa Mono and Bar Jamón

    What has anyone heard about this place? Its supposed to be opening shortly. Apparently its in the former location of Irving on Irving. Andy Nusser from Babbo is the new Chef De Cuisine. Its at 17th and Irving, 52 Irving Place.
  10. As many of you here already know, Japanese cuisine very often employs seemingly monotonous combinations of dashi, soy sauce, and mirin (and sake and sugar). I'd like to summarize the ratios that I actually used to make Japanese dishes here. Niku jaga (right) Dashi:soy sauce:mirin = 8:1:1 The other day, I wanted to have something light for supper, but I knew that my children wouldn't care for niku jaga, so I decided to make both niku jaga and curry. I simmered carrots, onions, potatoes, and pork for 10 minutes, and transferred one half to another pot to make both of them at the same time. Simmered daikon (right) Same as above (8:1:1) An 8:1:1 mixture of dashi, soy sauce, and mirin is called happou (versatile) dashi because it can be used for variety of dishes. I checked various recipes for happou dashi, and found it must be made with light (not dark) soy sauce. I'm a Kanto man, so I will stick to dark soy sauce. Nizakana (left) Water (not dashi):soy sauce:mirin:sake:sugar = 5:1:1:1:0.5 One recipe calls for the 5:1:1:1:1 ratio, but I wanted to make mine less sweet, so I settled on 0.5 instead of 1. Later I found another recipe that does not call for sugar, thus the 5:1:1:1 ratio. Takikomi gohan (lower left) Water (not dashi):soy sauce:sake:mirin = 12:1:0.75:0.5 One recipe calls for a dashi (not water), soy sauce, and mirin ratio of 12:1:1, and another recipe calls for 14:1:1, but I prefer the ratio above (without dashi and with sake). Dipping sauce for noodles Dashi:soy sauce:mirin = 4:1:1 I also use this ratio to make dipping sauce for tempura. Soup for hot noodles Dashi:soy sauce:mirin = 12:1:1 My special furikake Soy sauce:mirin = 1:1 45 ml each per mackerel can. Tendon sauce Dashi:soy sauce:mirin:sugar = 2:1:1:0.5 Tendon sauce should be sweet. Gyudon Dashi:soy sauce:mirin:sake = 10-12:1:1:1 May gyudon recipe can be found here. Japanese sauce for hamburgers Soy sauce:mirin:sake = 1:1:1 Chicken and negi "kuwa yaki" (chicken coated with wheat flour and pan-fried) Same as above. Made some corrections.
  11. Pannukakku has become a new favorite in the McAuley household. (LCBO Food & Wine, winter season 2016). We've been using Maple Syrup...made with DH's help in a local sugar shack...but the recipe actually calls for birch syrup. Does anyone know where to buy it in Ontario? Any grocery stores carry it? Specialty stores? Toronto? What about in the Cambridge/Kitchener/Waterloo area? Thanks.
  12. Salsa Para Enchiladas

    Salsa Para Enchiladas 3 ancho chiles 2 New Mexico chiles 2 chipotle chiles 1 clove garlic, sliced 2 TB flour 2 TB vegetable oil 1 tsp vinegar ¾ tsp salt ¼ tsp dried oregano 2 cups broth, stock, or (filtered) chili soaking liquid Rinse, stem and seed chiles. Place in saucepan and cover with water. Bring to boil. Cover and remove from heat and let soften and cool. While the chiles are cooling, gently sauté garlic slices in oil until they are soft and golden brown. Remove the garlic from the oil, with a slotted spoon and reserve. Make a light roux by adding the flour to the oil and sautéing briefly. Drain the chilies and puree them with the garlic slices and half of the liquid. Strain the puree back into the saucepan. Pour the remainder of the liquid through the sieve to loosen any remaining chili pulp. Add the roux to the saucepan and whisk to blend. Add the rest of the ingredients to the pan, bring to a boil then and simmer 15-20 minutes. Taste and add additional salt and vinegar if necessary.
  13. Thanks to eGullet friend, Deryn, I now am equipped to cook my first Thai curry (I hope.) Yesterday I stopped at our go-to Asian grocery store and stocked up on Thai specialities. I have pretty much all the ingredients I need such as: lemongrass, kaffir leaves, turmeric root, palm sugar, coconut cream, seeds of a variety of spices, rice noodles, tamarind, long skinny eggplant, etc, etc, and etc. I already cook some Indian, Arabic, Mexican and Chinese so I have a good variety of ingredients for these on hand. I could spend three hours now googling Thai curry recipes and come away confused about where to start. Please, someone take pity on me and supply me with a starter's type of curry. (No seafood please and thank you.) My thanks for any and all help.
  14. I am in the mood. I made a gumbo once, and it was really good, but it was back in my pre-eGullet times. I think I have the roux part down pat (but I'm always open to improvement). I would love to see discussion about your take on the differences in these dishes, your preferences, a favorite recipe, stories, etc. Do you have any recipe "secrets" you will share? Please feel free to link any previous threads on this subject or good internet information and recipes. My mother-in-law's favorite of all these is Shrimp Etouffee, and I would love to wow her with that the next time she comes for dinner, so I'll especially appreciate any of those recipes.
  15. I spent part of the morning mixing, blending and processing mustard seed into the base product that I will later "flavor" with various ingredients, then put up in jars and finish in a hot water bath. I have been making my own mustard for many years, it is really quite a simple process and I can have the flavors I want. It also makes a nice gift for a hostess or an addition to a holiday (or other occasion) gift basket. This mustard happens to be home grown, but mustard seed is readily available and I wondered why more people don't make their own, instead of paying some of the outrageous prices for some of the "trendy" mustards. I took a couple of photos, but ImageGullet is not available at this time so can't post them. Have you made mustard, either from mustard flour, or starting with seeds and if so, how did your product turn out and what varieties have you made?
  16. Pickles--Cook-Off 32

    Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index. This time, we're focusing on pickles. Pickling is a preservation method that uses vinegar or a brine and versions of pickled vegetables, fruit, fish and meat can be found throughout the world. Whether you've wanted to try your hand at tsukemono (Japanese pickles), kimchi (Korean), Moroccan preserved lemons, pickled watermelon, good old kosher dills, or any other pickle, now is the time to do it! There are no restrictions here - let's talk about refrigerator versus 'canning' in a hot water bath. Let's argue the merits of vinegar versus salt. Whatever we do, let's help me figure out how to make my grandmother's dill pickles! There are a few topics on pickles/pickling, including a topic about half and full sours, one on pickle terminology, this topic looked for perfect pickle preparations, and this one introduced a new, quick pickling technique, and most recently, we've had some pickle chat in the Cradle of Flavor cooking topic. If that's not enough inspiration for you, reading Fruit of the Brine, a Tangy Memoir may be just the trick. And don't forget to check the 13 recipes in RecipeGullet! One last thing. If, like me, you haven't pickled anything since you were five, I've asked for and received a few book recommendations: Quick Pickles by Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby Ball Blue Book of Preserving The New Preserves : Pickles, Jams, and Jellies by Anne V. Nelson Pickled: Vegetables, Fruits, Roots, More--Preserving a World of Tastes and Traditions by Lucy Norris and Elizabeth Watt Who's in?
  17. In this topic on sweet potato salad, Jaymes said (about mayonnaise): I have to disagree: while some cooks here in Atlanta use it, most that I know prefer Hellman's. I certainly do. Duke's is oddly sweet -- halfway to Miracle Whip, in my opinion -- and I can pick it out immediately in things like tuna or potato salad when it's used. If I were faced with the choice of Duke's or nothing on a sandwich, I think I'd have to choose the latter. Am I missing something? Do people really like Duke's? Are there other brands worth trying?
  18. Whole Green Fig Preserve

    For those folk who have access to a fig tree or two, here is a recipe for Green Fig Preserve inherited from my fathers recipes. The resulting product is magic on buttered toast and with cheese. The figs must be picked before they ripen and soften. Whole Green Fig Preserve Ingredients: 100 green figs 2 tablespoons bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) 3.4 litres water Method: Scrub the figs and cut a cross into the end opposite the stalk. Mix the water and bicarbonate of soda and soak the figs overnight. Remove from the water and weigh the figs, recording the weight. Place into clean boiling water and boil for 15 minutes or until just soft. Drain and then dry the figs well, removing excess water. Syrup: For each 500g figs or part thereof, mix 500ml water with 500g sugar. Boil the syrup until it just starts to thicken. Add the figs and boil until the syrup is thick. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice for each 250g figs and just bring to the boil again before removing from the heat and letting cool. Bottle the figs and cover with the syrup. Note 1: If the syrup froths whilst boiling, add a small lump of butter. Note 2: A small stick of ginger can be added during the boiling process to add a slightly different flavour.
  19. A friend recently gifted me with a small jar of this incredible Bomba Calabrese. I thought I'd died and gone to spicy heaven. :wub: This particular brand is made by Gigi and is a product of Italy. The ingredients are: eggplant, pepper, hot chili peppers, mushrooms, artichokes, sunflower oil, olive oil, spices and salt. It is also not in chunks or pieces, but is easily spreadable. I found a few recipes for Bomba Calabrese online, but would like to try one that someone from eG recommends if possible. Barring that, I will make one of the found recipes and blenderize it perhaps. And also try to locate the product locally. I've contacted the distributor but not heard back yet. Thanks for any help.
  20. I am currently making some hummos types of spreads and have been making them in a vitamix. The vitamix is getting way too small so I bought a 23 quart robot coupe and it's too slow and will not emulsify like the vitamix. I've been forced to do part of the process in a vitamix and part in the robot coupe but it's so inefficient. Anyone out there know of a faster food processor that will emulsify large batches of food. I've looked at colloidal mills but they are too expensive, but really cool. One of my spreads is an almond+cilantro pesto that is sooooo delicious I usually make about 14 half lb. containers and sell out at markets around NYC pretty quickly. I'm looking to wholesale these soon so need to make a lot more. thanks
  21. Sōsu Sriracha Sauce

    This is Good! Much better (IMO) than the more widely recognized Huy Fong "rooster sauce." Not as sweet, missing the chemical additives, with a bit of smokiness and packed in glass rather than plastic. My new standard sriracha sauce. We combined our philosophy of using fresh, locally sourced ingredients with the age-old craft of fermentation. We age our secret pepper mash in whiskey barrels for between one and three months. The sriracha takes on complex flavors from the oak barrels and the natural fermentation process. Absolutely no preservatives or additives go into our sriracha. Each bottle is handcrafted and made in small batches to ensure the most intense flavors. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpibEm0vFSU
  22. Curried soups - So delicious

    In my long years of life, never before have I had or made a curried soup. I found a recipe which appealed to me in a free vegetarian magazine distributed by our local bulk and health food store: Alive . I bring it home to read every time I go in there, although mostly to see what recipes might appeal to me...and most don't I have to admit. It's not that I don't like vegetarian food, which I do, but this is just a tad 'too' healthy for me usually. But this recipe was for a "Spicy Thai Yam and Lentil Soup" and I made it for lunch today. I have to admit that I did add shredded pork leftover from the last Puerco Pibil. If the recipe is traditionally Thai I have no idea, but adding pork from the Yucatan region certainly did not add to its authenticity. It was a huge success and now I am definitely in the market for curried soup recipes. All regional cuisines are welcome. Just found the recipe online: http://www.alive.com/recipes/view/1563/spicy_thai_yam_and_lentil_soup
  23. I was watching Alton Brown on Good Eats make a batch of mayo. He filled a regular store-bought mayonnaise jar with his homemade concoction and proceeded to say that We should use it within a week. A week!? That's not a lot of time to mow through some mayo, man! I make a ton of egg salad sandwiches, roast beef sandwiches, tuna fish sandwiches - I use a lot of mayo - yet a regular store-bought jar of mayo still seems to last an eternity on the door of my fridge. Are there additives to the store-bought variety that can increase it's longevity so much, or is my beloved AB watching his 6 and erring on the side of his lawers?
  24. Pickles

    hey everybody! i'm new here and i'm in love with pickles. i go through a jar a day and i was wondering if you guys know a simple recipe for pickling cucumbers? i'd like one without the need of dill, lime and peppers. thanks you guys
  25. Sriracha "Caviar"

    There is a big Sriracha thread already, but I'd like to ask about a more specific application. For me, I think the best recommendation from that thread is sriracha on scrambled eggs. From that, I find that like to dot my eggs with sriracha, so it occurred to me that a spherified caviar form could be cool way to add a visual element to the introduction of novices to the practice. I read all the spherification threads with interest, but really have never had the desire to experiment with all the forms. But this application, I feel, is one I really want to do. So, for those so versed, what is the proper path to Sriracha Caviar?
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