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Found 568 results

  1. Chevre & Apple Chutney Roll Serves 8 as Appetizer. The chutney part of the recipe (adapted from a recipe in a November 1996 “Bon Appétit” magazine) makes approximately 3 cups of chutney which is more than is needed for the roll. However, the chutney is excellent as a condiment and we never have a difficult time using up the "extra". The chutney is best if made at least one day before using so the flavors can mellow. Use golden raisins for a light-colored chutney and dark raisins for a dark chutney. Also, other dried fruits (prunes, apricots, etc.) can be substituted for the raisins as variations to the basic recipe. Chutney 1-1/2 c apple cider vinegar 2 c sugar 1-1/2 lb tart apples, peeled, cored, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces 10 large garlic cloves, minced 2 oz fresh ginger, peeled, minced 1-1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp dried crushed red pepper 1-1/2 c (packed) raisins, coarsely chopped 2 T yellow or brown (or a mixture of the two) mustard seeds Roll 12 oz chevre, at room temperature 1/2 c apple chutney (from above), cooled or chilled Bring the vinegar and sugar to a boil in a saucepan, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Simmer for 10 minutes. Add the minced garlic and stir. Mix in the remaining chutney ingredients (but not the chevre!). Simmer until the apples are tender and the chutney thickens, stirring occasionally while it cooks. 45-60 minutes. Cool chutney and chill until used. Pat the softened chevre onto a sheet of plastic wrap in a rough rectangular shape. Cover with another sheet of plastic wrap and roll (or pat) into a 1/4"-thick rectangle. Peel off the top sheet of plastic and spread the chevre with a thin layer of chutney. Use the bottom sheet of plastic wrap to help roll the chutney covered chevre, along the long side of the rectangle, into a tight roll. Or, you can line a small loaf pan or other mold with plastic wrap and spread alternating layers of chevre and chutney inside the mold, packing each layer firmly,starting and ending with chevre. Unmold onto a serving plate and peel off the plastic. Chill if not serving immediately (roll can be made up to one day beforehand) and bring to room temperature before serving with crackers or bread. Keywords: Hors d'oeuvre, Vegetarian, Condiment, Appetizer, Easy, Cheese, Snack ( RG1046 )
  2. Suzanne F

    Green Tomato Jam

    Green Tomato Jam Makes about 8 3/4 cups of jam; about ten 1-cup (8 ounce) jars. This recipe is adapted from the General Foods Consumer Center. 1-3/4 lb green tomatoes 1/2 c lemon juice 7-1/2 c sugar (3-1/4 pounds) 2 pkg (pouches) fruit pectin jell Wash the tomatoes. Grind, and measure 3 cups of tomatoes into a 6- to 8-quart nonreactive pot. Add the lemon juice. Add the sugar and mix thoroughly. Place over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. As soon as it reaches a boil, stir in the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil, and boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam. Ladle immediately into hot, sterilized canning jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of the top. Wipe the rims and threads of the jars. Cover the jars with 2-piece lids and screw the bands tightly. Invert the jars for 5 minutes, then turn upright. Let cool for 1 hour, then check seals. Variation: I added some finely minced lemongrass and very finely julienned lime leaf, for a little more "exotic" flavor. Keywords: Intermediate, Vegetables, Condiment ( RG731 )
  3. Sorry to lower the tone, but did anyone catch his TV show last night? Christ is there no end to this mans philanthropy, when he dies they should canonise him at least. Anyway the basis is, Jamie is going to give one of his 'downtrodden, disadvantaged and desolate' trainees the chance to run their own restaurant. So four trainees have to battle it out to see who wins etc etc. Of course the purpose of this venture is not to promote his ever expanding empire and do-gooder image, but to give some poor soul the chance to be happy, successful and a whole person. However a few questions/ points: 1. These 'disadvantaged ' individuals did not seem that bad to me. Ok one had stole a car twice, one had overdone it on the gak, one came from Thailand and the other was an Irish lad ( being Irish seemingly his criteria for disadvantagedness) Hardly the Asbo generation? 2. Prior to his 15 project was it really so hard to become a chef? He kept claiming last night how much he had changed these 'kids' lives by giving them a chance to become a chef! 3. Why did he feel the need to step up the swearing ala Gordon Ramsey? Come on Jamie not really the image you want to portray. Even Ruth Watson was swearing. 4. Who the fuck is Ruth Watson? 5. Why did he feel the need to show his vast fortune of? Driver, mansion, lavish birthday celebrations etc etc? Was it to show the poor people that if they take over this pub they could have all this? 6. Why did the Irish lad's Mum have subtitles when she was speaking English albeit with a bit of an accent? 7 Was it a coincidence that the name of pub was called The Cock? This had to be the most patronising piece of television I have ever seen, well since his last piece of pseudo altruistic nonsense....... Apologies one and all I felt I had to vent my spleen
  4. Yah, yah, I'm sick, it's supposedly end stage cancer, I'm going through total skin electron beam radiation, blahdiblah blah... Here's the important thing. I NEED a decent pickle. I do not want to meet the end (or face the fight against an end) without having savored, at least once more, a delicious-perfectly pickled-puckery-garlicky-yet-not-overpoweringly-so cucumber, even if it isn't of my own manufacture. I have NO energy. I AM fussy about my pickles. The plebian yet enjoyable BaTampte isn't going to cut is this time. Where can I send a well meaning friend in the Freehold area to acquire this lovely for me? I prefer a more than slightly green pickle, a well pickled, but still light and crisp pickle, where the flesh hasn't greened as yet. Garlic is a must. Vinegar is a no no. Brine is the all important base. Can any of you NJ experts assist me? My friend is ready for action at any time.
  5. cooksandcapers

    Chutney Making

    Hello all, my first post. I have been picking up loads of tips from the forums over the past couple of months, it’s a great site. I was wondering if anyone had any thoughts on why chutneys are made in the way that they are, ie chop, add sugar, add vinegar… heat, stir lots and wait ages?? We have recently done a big batch of this one (about 15 times the recipe) http://redskitchendiaries.wordpress.com/2010/12/04/weekend-project-ale-chutney/ We have been thinking about how we might cut down on time and energy costs by taking a different route, and of course getting a quality product at the end. My understanding of preserving in this way is that you need to: 1. Stop enzyme/bacterial activity, this is done quite quickly with heat 2. Get to a pH of 4.5 or below 3. Introduce enough sugar so that the amount of available water for pathogens is decreased to an acceptable level, (which I think is a fair interpretation of water activity) Does anyone know why you need to stand over a stove for hours to reduce the liquid, why can’t you cook the veg to the point you want it, then separate the liquid, reduce to a good consistency and pot as normal? Any views would be greatly appreciated Rich
  6. The latest eG Radio foodcast -- an exclusive interview with the editor of the New York Times dining section (Pete Wells) and the editor-in-chief of Saveur magazine (James Oseland) -- is online and available for download now. The announcement, download and subscription links are here. This topic is for discussion of the content of the current eG Radio foodcast. If you need technical support with, for example, downloading or playing the foodcast, please use the Technical Support forum. If you have questions or comments about the eG Radio foodcast effort that are not related to the specific issues dealt with in this program, please submit those to the eGullet Society Member Feedback forum. Thanks!
  7. mikeczyz

    coconut chutney

    any ideas on how to make it? fresh coconut? what is it ususally served along with? what purpose to chutney's serve? calm down spicy foods? mike
  8. xortch

    Unset Jam?

    I followed the recipie for making jam on from Alton Brown available here. In the process I measured out 24 fl. oz. of blackberries instead of 24 oz by wieght and my jam did not set. So now I've got a bunch of runny preserves, is there anyway to correct this and boil it down some more or something to get it to set? It's still useable but id rather it be spreadable and not so liquidous.
  9. chemprof

    Thai Basil Pepper Jelly

    Thai Basil Pepper Jelly This is good as: an appetizer when spread over cream cheese or goat cheese and served with crackers or toasted bread rounds or a condiment with pork or lamb (or even chicken!). This recipe is adapted from one called "Walt's Habanero Jelly" which can be found in various places on the net including "recipesource.com". 2 c chopped red and yellow bell pepper 1 c fresh thai basil leaves 1-1/2 c vinegar (1/2 & 1/2) rice wine and cider 5 c sugar 1 T lime or lemon juice 5 habanero chiles (orange and/or red) 1 tsp butter 1 pkg pectin (powder, sure-jell) Prepare jelly jars according to directions (wash w/ hot soapy water, sterilize lids by pouring boiling water over). I like to use the little 1/2 cup jars. Seed and stem bell peppers, chop finely CAREFULLY seed and stem habanero peppers (I highly recommend you wear a mask and gloves when you do this...these are the most toxic things I have worked with outside the lab!). Chop finely (I use a small food processor/chopper for this). Measure sugar into a bowl. Place the chiles, bell peppers, dry pectin, vinegar and butter in a large stainless steel pot. Bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Add sugar immediately, return to a rolling boil and boil exactly one minute. Remove from heat and fill prepared jelly jars. Wipe rims with damp cloth, cover with lid and screw on bands tightly. Invert for 5 minutes then turn over and let cool slowly. After jars are cool check seals by pressing top of jars. If lid springs up, jar is not sealed (But can be kept in fridge!). I shake these occasionally as they cool to distribute the peppers so it looks nice. Tastes just as good if you don't and just stir before serving. ;-) Variations: You can use from 5-15 habaneros, depending on how much heat you want! I usually use about 10. I have made rosemary by subbing about 1/4-1/2 cups of chopped rosemary leaves. You might want to use all cider vinegar for that version. Keywords: Hot and Spicy, Easy, Appetizer, Condiment ( RG1106 )
  10. Holly Moore

    Southern Preserves

    Not that the issue of the South and butter has been explained I'm turning my attention to fruit preserves, Southern style. Unlike the preserves I've grown up on, a lumpy sweet slurry that easily spreads on toast. Jack McDavid, at Jack's Firehouse in Philadelphia, first introduced me to what I assume is the Southern approach to preserves - a thin sweet syrup with large chunks of fruit. Since then I've seen such preserves throughout the South, most recently at Monell's in Nashville. The chunks of fruit are indeed tasty. I spoon them out of the syrup and gently balance them on a biscuit half. Sometimes they don't full out en route to my mouth, staining my shirt. But the syrup pretty much goes to waste. What am I not getting? What's the proper way to apply Southern style preserves? Why are they so, what we Yankees would call, watery?
  11. I really miss Frank's Red Hot Sauce. I use it to make the hotwings I grew up with. Other hot sauces I can find easily in NY are not doing the job. Anyone know where I can buy it in Manhattan? Thanks folks, Grace
  12. Honey-Mustard Rotini with Chicken Serves 8 as Main Dish. This is a standby disk that I make whenever I can't decide what else to make. I've made variations with basil in lieu of or in addition to the parsley, adding heavy cream, sour cream or yogurt, adding sun-dried tomatoes, whatever, but at it's base it's a simple, inexpensive, filling dinner. 1 lb Chicken thighs, boned & skins removed, cut into bite-size pieces 1 medium onion, chopped 2 T minced or pressed fresh garlic 1 T olive oil 1/2 c your favorite prepared mustard 1/4 c olive oil 1/4 c honey 1/2 c toasted pine nuts 2 T minced fresh parsley 1/2 c freshly grated Parmesan or other fragrant hard cheese 1 lb rotini or other bite-size pasta, cooked 1. In a skillet, saute chicken, onion & half of garlic in 1 T olive oil until chicken is just cooked. 2. In a bowl, whisk together mustard, 1/4 C olive oil and honey until fully combined. Add pine nuts, parsley, cheese, and chicken mixture; stir to combine. 3. Stir mixture into hot pasta and serve, topping with additional cheese. Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Chicken, Dinner ( RG2055 )
  13. IndyRob

    Sriracha "Caviar"

    There is a big Sriracha thread already, but I'd like to ask about a more specific application. For me, I think the best recommendation from that thread is sriracha on scrambled eggs. From that, I find that like to dot my eggs with sriracha, so it occurred to me that a spherified caviar form could be cool way to add a visual element to the introduction of novices to the practice. I read all the spherification threads with interest, but really have never had the desire to experiment with all the forms. But this application, I feel, is one I really want to do. So, for those so versed, what is the proper path to Sriracha Caviar?
  14. SobaAddict70

    Ketchup

    I've never been able to figure out why foodies tend to despise ketchup. Like just about any condiment, it has its applications. If you don't like it, there are a million other condiments out there. The same goes for Worcestershire sauce and barbecue sauce, deli mustard and honey mustard, pickle relish and mango chutney, and jarred salsa. Why ask why? Just enjoy it for what it is. Maybe I'm weird for liking ketchup. I also will eat pickle relish straight out of a jar. Ditto for hoisin sauce. Soba PS. In the omuraisu thread in the Japan forum, Hiroyuki asks pretty much the same question, ao I thought I'd ask all y'all.
  15. Fred12fred

    Soy sauce noodles?

    My wife and I were watching a recent tv show (I think it was Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern, but could have been No Reservations (Tony Bourdain)) where the person was in Hong Kong. In one scene, they showed someone making soy sauce noodles, which gave my wife a serious Proustian moment as she grew up in HK and misses it badly. Ever since then, she's been craving this dish. And, I have no idea what how to go about making this for her. From what I can tell, the dish seems to be just egg noodles, soy sauce, and bean sprouts. They're all stir fried on high heat. That's it. Clearly, there must be something more to this. Is it just soy sauce or some special blend of things? Garlic? Onion? I pretty much know that the "secret" is going to be in the frying part, but I'd at least like to have a small chance of recreating this by knowing what to put in the dish. So, I turn to the great masses of eGullet and ask: does anyone know what this dish is? And, can you please help me figure out how to recreate it?
  16. A few days ago I posted a topic over in the Special Occasions forum. Next week I need to make Jelly doughnuts / jam-busters on TV. Now - it's been a few years since I've made them - but after tested a couple of recipes, then tweaking, I've come up with my own recipe that I like very much. My question involves the logistics of it all. I need to be at the TV studio at 6:45 in the morning. I figure I'll have a dough ready to go so that we can roll and cut them - but I think I should take some rounds ready to go (proofed again). Does anybody have any suggestions on how to best do this whole thing? I just put a few rounds in the freezer - can I do that the day before and just pull them out in the morning when I leave? Will they rise and fry well? Any thoughts? For filling them, I've tried a couple of things - the best thing that's worked for me is to cut a little x at one end with a pointed knife, then use a pastry bag with a small, plain circle tip to insert the filling. If anybody has any suggestions to make this work smoothly I'd appreciate it. Tip and ideas welcome.
  17. achevres

    Cinco de Mayo appetizer

    I have been invited to a Cinco de Mayo party and asked to bring an appetizer for 6. I don't think it has to be Mexican, but I would like to bring something either Mexican or Southwestern in flavor or spirit (or at least South of the border). I don't want to bring salsas or guacamole or anything so predictable. Most of the interesting things I can think of need last minute attention, like fritters or gorditas etc. I like the idea of a shrimp seviche, but it looks messy to eat standing up. Any ideas on presenting a seviche for a cocktail-type party are welcome. I would like something that could be served room temperature and be prepared in advance. It doesn't have to be "authentic," just taste great and suitably impress . Also, I don't have time to experiment. I would like something you have made before. Too much to ask?
  18. Yesterday I had the always renewed pleasure of waiting in line for nearly half an hour at my local Poste to ship a package to a friend in Atlanta, GA. Inside: 3 jars of mustard. Weight of package: a hair over 2kg. The post office woman asked me what I was sending in my package and when I said, "De la moutarde," she looked at me and shook her head. Oh, no, that won't do. You can't send alimentary products to the U.S. People get their packages opened and pulled apart. She took out a book of rules in different countries and flipped through it until she found the U.S. Yes, indeed, I needed to declare my package to the FDA and get a waiver to send it on, which would then be affixed to my package and everything could go smoothly. This seemed utterly absurd to me! We're not talking about produce or meat or anything remotely dangerous, but jars (sterilized obviously by their maker - these are purchased jars of mustard available in stores) of ground mustard seed, vinegar, etc. So now I have my carefully packed package on the counter in my hallway. I don't want to let down my mustard-loving friend, but the idea of going through all the hoops seems silly. Does anyone else have experience sending food items through the Poste (or via some other means; because as a side remark, she told me that as my package was over 2kg it had to be send by Colissimo blablabla, some higher-up level of shipping, and would cost 37.50 € - which also kind of stinks...).
  19. Quick question here - My potato salad recipe for this weekend begins with roasted new potatoes and a mayo/sriracha dressing. Trying to think of what to add from there without including the normal hard boiled egg, celery, etc..... Blanched/chopped fresh green beans...pickled asparagus....I know some obvious and delicious stuff is escaping me here..... IDEAS?
  20. Renee K

    Jelly Roll Sponge I

    Jelly Roll Sponge I 200 g eggs 120 g caster (superfine) sugar 125 g cake flour 1/2 tsp baking powder 40 g oil sift flour and baking powder together twice whisk egg whites till foamy, and gradually add the sugar. at soft peaks, add the yolks gradually and continue whisking to ribbon stage fold in the dry ingredients, followed by the oil pour into 28cm x 36cm (11 x 14 inch) or 25 x 36cm (10 x 14 inch) swiss roll pan bake at 200C (ummm... I think that's about 400F??) for about 8-10 minutes, depending on oven. Do not overbake. unmould immediately onto a wire rack once cool, spread with filling and roll up Keywords: Dessert, Cake ( RG1810 )
  21. Rachel Perlow

    Honey Fig Jam

    Honey Fig Jam 1 pt figs 1 c honey 1 tsp cinnamon 1 tsp all spice 1/4 tsp salt 1 tsp ginger, freshly grated 1 lemon or small orange, finely grated zest and juice Wash, remove the stem and blossom end of figs, cut in quarters. Put in heavy bottomed pot with the rest of the ingredients. Bring to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 1 hour. Remove lid, remove figs with a spoon to a food mill fitted with large holed disk. Pass fruit through back into pot, discard skin left in the food mill. Stir pulp into liquid. Simmer for another 10 minutes or so then place into clean jar and store in the fridge. Yields about 1 cup. Keywords: Fruit, Dessert, Vegetarian, Intermediate, Breakfast, Topping/Frosting ( RG1156 )
  22. I was in my local wine store today and decided to pick up some Scotch. I was in two or three minds about what to get until someone went in the back and pressed the above bottle into my hand. It appears to be a house blend from the well known London spirits merchants, though their Web site gives no hint this even exists. It tastes its age, costs all of $30 and it's bloody good. Has anyone else come across this before? Perhaps it's a U.S.-only bottling?
  23. Monica Bhide

    Eggless Mayonnaise

    My dad called and wants a recipe for eggless mayo -- I am not sure how to make it. I found some stuff on google with soy milk.. does not look appetizing at all. He can use regular milk if needed .. just does not want to use eggs.... any suggestions.. Also if this has already been covered here somewhere please just send me the link.. I tried a search but could not find anything thanks
  24. lovebenton0

    spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney

    spicy pineapple/rhubarb chutney i love chutneys with all kinds of meat, fish and even simple chutney sandwiches, as Monica Bhide suggests in Everything Indian. thanks, snowangel, for suggesting this one i concocted would be good with a sharp cheddar grilled cheese sandwich; it is. this is especially good also with pork, chicken and salmon. makes one pint chutney. 2-1/2 c rhubarb, diced 1/2 inch 1 c unsweetened pineapple, sliced and chopped 1/4 c golden raisins 1/4 c cider vinegar 3/4 c sugar 2 T ginger, minced 1/4 tsp ground cloves 1/4 tsp curry powder 1/4 tsp ground cardamom 1 tsp hot thai chile flakes 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 T grapeseed oil 1/2 tsp kosher salt mix fruits with sugar and vinegar. allow to set for about an hour to extract juices and soften raisins. stir in spices, oil and salt. i wanted to try out the jam setting on my kneadful thing and did so. that was great, no muss, no stirring. otherwise i would have cooked this on medium low heat for about 30 to 45 minutes (depending on preference), stirring as needed to keep it from sticking. store in jar in fridge up to two months. Keywords: Condiment, Fruit, Easy, Hot and Spicy ( RG1975 )
  25. teapot

    Super Bowl 2014 -- Feast mode!

    So excited that our Seattle Seahawks are in the Super Bowl this year! What are people making? Any Seahawk fans planning a Seattle-inspired menu? One that doesn't involve any last minute cooking? I'm making sourdough bread and bacon/onion jam to go with someone's beef tenderloin. To bring in some Seattle touches, we'll have smoked salmon, a Northwest berry cobbler. And as a nod to Seahawk colors: blue corn chips and guacamole. There'll be IPAs of course (Seattle's a very hopped up city)but I'm also trying to come up with a clever cocktail - or hawktail (I've thought of making blue rock candy to use as a sugar rim on a sage margarita).
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