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  1. I am looking for a T&T recipe for Flour tortillas as well as the way to cook them without special equipment (in a simple pan). Is it possible to make the dough with a stand mixer or a food processor ? Help welcomed
  2. Street Tacos with Salsa Verde, Le Merced Market, Mexico City Mexican Salsa. It can be hot and numbing to the tongue, sweet or bitter, made with red tomatoes or green tomatillos, dried, roasted or fresh chiles, grilled pineapple, chopped, diced, chunky or blended smooth. Salsas can be raw or cooked, or use a combination of raw and cooked ingredients. And the style of the salsa, the heat and the flavor, should be matched to the dish you serve it with. The two most common types of salsa most people think of are Salsa Roja, better known as red sauce, often mild and sweet in flavor. Salsa Fresca usually takes the form of Pico de Gallo, which translates to "rooster's beak." Pico de Gallo is simple to make using just a few ingredients. But salsa is of course much more diverse. Some Mexican salsa recipes borrow from condiment recipes in Asia and use heady amounts of ginger. Pico de Gallo is good with homemade tortilla chips, but it might not be the right choice for every dish. A fresh tomatillo and Manzano chile salsa is delicious with grilled snapper, while a grilled pineapple salsa is best with butter pound cake and crema. Matching the complexity and flavor of a salsa with the dish is akin to pairing the right wine with food. The techniques used to make a Mexican salsa also vary. The Maya made salsa by hand using a molcajete or mortar and pestle type of tool. Today, a blender or food processor makes the job go by quicker, but the mortar and pestle still has its place, as does making salsa by hand with a good kitchen knife. The comal is a flat, smooth griddle used throughout Mexico, Central and South America to cook tortillas, toast spices and sear meats. It's also used to toast dried chiles to bring out their smoky flavor before blending them into a salsa. Comals are typically made of steel, flat or with a low outside rim. I use both a comal or a cast-iron skillet to toast onions and garlic to add char and bring out sweetness before adding them with other ingredients and blending into a salsa. Charred, toasted onion and garlic in a cast-iron skillet. Let's come together in our home kitchens and present and savor our favorite Mexican Salsas. In the tradition of the eG Cook-Off Series, this is eG Cook-Off #85: Mexican Salsa. See the complete eG Cook-Off Index here: https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/
  3. Welcome to eG Cook-Off 46! Click here for the Cook-Off index. We spent the last Cook-Off perfecting french fries, delightful yet leaning toward the one-dimensional. This time we're shifting gears and making the multi-dimensional Mexican dish, enchiladas. The variations on enchiladas are endless-there doesn't seem to be one "definitive," classic, enchilada recipe. They can be filled with beef, pork, chicken, smoked duck, smoked turkey or steamed octopus. An enchilada might be slathered with melted cheese, sprinkled with queso fresco, or have no cheese at all. It seems as though the only thing that enchiladas have in common is that all versions are wrapped in some type of tortilla. There are lots of possibilities for saucing an enchilada, everything from what one finds in a can on the supermarket shelf to homemade salsas using dried chilies. And of course, the variety of dried chilies to use for the sauce -- from mild to devil hot -- is also endless. In her definitive Art of Mexican Cooking, Diana Kennedy describes the two methods for making enchiladas. In one, you lightly fry the tortilla before dipping it into sauce; the process is reversed in the other. For both versions, you then fill the sauced and fried tortilla and roll it up. Kennedy's enchiladas placeras are sauced with a garlic, serrano, and tomato salsa and then filled with shredded beef; her enchiladas de Santa Clara uses an ancho and garlic sauce and an egg and cheese filling (and sounds delicious). Enchiladas benefit from corny, lardy homemade tortillas but also can mask mediocre ones to good effect, and they are an excellent way to showcase a perfect salsa. The previous main enchilada topic can be found here. You can also find topics on making tortillas at home here and a pictorial topic on Making Mexican at home is here. I've eaten hundreds of enchiladas in restaurants, but I was never able to duplicate that "restaurant-quality" enchilada flavor at home. My tortillas were either mushy or were too cold and broke when I rolled them with the filling. I also didn't want to serve my enchiladas with the requisite mushy beans and marginal "Spanish rice." What would be a unique side dish for Enchiladas? And what tortilla recipes would best stand up to the abuse of enchilada manufacture?
  4. Hi there! I am looking for a good Mexican cookbook. Any recommendations? Thanks in advance.
  5. Having recently moved to British Columbia from Los Angeles I'm sorely missing my fresh Mexican ingredients...mainly fresh masa both for tortillas and tamales. Does anyone have a recipe for home made masa dough? If I can replicate my beloved masa, I'm willing to give it a shot! Many thanks!
  6. Ah, the avocado! For many of us, this humble little fruit inspires only one dish. Yet the avocado has a culinary history that is deeper than we may understand. The avocado (Persea Americana) is a tree thought to have originated in South Central Mexico. It’s a member of the flowering plant family Lauraceae. The fruit of the plant - yes, it's a fruit and not a vegetable - is also called avocado. Avocados grow in tropical and warm climates throughout the world. The season in California typically runs from February through September, but avocados from Mexico are now available year-round. The avocado has a higher fat content than other fruits, and as such serves as an important staple in the diet of consumers who are seeking other sources of protein than meats and fatty foods. Avocado oil has found a new customer base due to its flavor in dressings and sauces and the high smoke point is favorable when sautéing meat and seafood. In recent years, due in part to catchy television commercials and the influence of Pinterest, the avocado has seen a resurgence in popularity with home cooks and professionals. Walk into your local casual spot and the menu will undoubtedly have some derivation of avocado toast, typically topped with bacon. Avocados have found a rightful place back on fine dining menus, but unfortunately all too often over-worked dishes with too many ingredients and garnishes erase the pure taste and silky texture of an avocado. When I think of an avocado it’s the Hass variety. However, a friend who lives in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, can buy Choquette, Hall and Lulu avocados in the local markets. This link provides good information about the different varieties of avocados, when they’re in season and the differences in taste and texture. https://www.foodrepublic.com/2012/10/18/know-your-avocado-varieties-and-when-theyre-in-season/ I for one must challenge myself to start eating and cooking more avocados. I think my recipe for guacamole served with chicharrones is superb, and the cobb salad with large chunks of ripe avocado is delicious, but as a close friend recently said, “one person’s ‘not especially new’ is another’s “eureka moment.” Well said and as history tells us, we’ll find plenty of eureka moments as we discuss and share our tales and dishes of avocado during eG Cook-Off #81: The Avocado. Fun fact: The name avocado derives from the Nahuatl word “ahuacatl,” which was also slang for “testicle.” See the complete eG Cook-Off Index here https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/
  7. Chile Rellenos. Every Mexican or Mexican type restaurant we've ever been in almost, I've chosen Chile Rellenos. I keep thinking I'll pick something different...and then I don't. I've made them. Once. So much trouble. And deep fat frying. And of course in the Far Frozen North where we live, we've been able to get Poblanos (that's it) for only about five years now. Imagine my delight, the appeal to my very lazy side, to discover the following recipe just a few days ago: https://www.homesicktexan.com/2018/09/chile-relleno-casserole-el-paso-style.html . And yesterday I made them and served them to guests with Mexican rice and black beans. Died and gone to heaven. OK. Truth time. I used Poblanos and I did not roast them to remove the skins. In an electric oven, it's not a nice job. And besides the skins have never bothered me or Ed at all. But I did roast the Poblanos in the oven. And then I used commercial salsa because we had one we liked. (Did I say that I can be lazy sometimes?) And I used Pepper Jack cheese. Jack cheese is not always available in the small Ontario city we live outside of and pepper jack is even less common. Buy it when you see it. I defrosted some frozen guacamole I had in the freezer. But by heavens the casserole was delicious and now it's on our menu permanently. So shoot me. But I thought I'd share my joy anyway.
  8. Living in the great frozen north as we do, we are confronted with a distinct lack of ingredients for making Mexican food. No fresh peppers except Jalapenos, no tomatillos, no Mexican cheeses except for Jack, and only flour tortillas. However, we have plastic wrapped stacks of corn tostados. Hard crunchy corn discs, 6" across. Please, some ideas of what one does with them.
  9. Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index. A couple of days ago, we were trying to figure out a good cook-off topic for late April/early May, and someone suggested tacos. Shortly thereafter, Mark Bittman of the New York Times decided to weigh in with this article, titled "Sunday Morning, Yucatán:" Bittman shares three recipes, as well, for Taco Filling With Poblano Strips and Potatoes, Mushroom Taco Filling, and Nopales Filling. Meanwhile, over at Bon Appetit, Steven Raichlen writes about the food of the Yucatan, including, naturally, tacos. Finally, someone pointed out that the 5th of May was coming -- you know, Cinco de Mayo. So tacos it is: soft or hard, corn or flour, meat, fish, or veg. As always, we've got a few topics to get us started, including these on tacos al pastor, how to create a DIY taco stand, cabbage in tacos, and fish tacos. There are also tortilla recipes here and a reheating tortillas discussion here. From cheap on the low-down to gussied-up, tacos run the gamut. What are your go-to recipes? Any that you've been dying to try? You can do better than a big fast food chain place, even if you want that ground beef Tex-Mex style of taco. Let's get cooking.
  10. 'Our menu is based on Mexican and Latin American flavors, therefor we can't not have fresh guacamole. We fly through the stuff!! One recipe uses 72 avocados which yields about 20 quarts of guacamole. We go through this amount almost every day. On top of having someone (or a couple of) people pressing fresh tortillas, we are spending a lot of time on this menu item. I can't think of any way to make the guacamole less labor intensive without sacrificing the quality. I have considered table side, or to-order made guac. Any thoughts or ideas? Thanks!
  11. Chiles en Nogada are traditionally served only for Mexican Independence Day (16 de Septiembre). Every household and restaurant have their own version. In years past we have eaten as many as 12 different versions in the course of the week long celebration. Certain things about it never change: always poblanos, walnuts, pomegranate seeds and dried fruit (though the types of dried and fresh fruit vary as does the ratio of fruit to meat). And the cream sauce is always room temperature, never heated. Not only is it a tasty dish, it is about the prettiest meal ever put on a plate. I have made them at home (but not for several years). Rick Bayless's recipe is the one I used. http://www.rickbayless.com/recipe/pork-and-fruit-stuffed-chiles-in-white-walnut-sauce/ The history of the dish is one of creating a festive dish on the spur of the moment with limited ingredients. https://www.tripsavvy.com/chiles-en-nogada-1588803
  12. Thinking about putting a chorizo burger on the menu. It would most likely be a 50/50 blend of chorizo and ground chuck. I'm thinking this means I can't do a mid rare burger? Anyone have any experience with this?
  13. I had lunch recently at a Mexican restaurant, and on their buffet, they had a terrific chicken dish. I was told it was chicken adobado, but I think there was some confusion--the adobado recipes have a red sauce, and this dish had a white, creamy sauce that maybe had some mild cheese in it. The dish had chicken chunks, mushrooms and spinach. Ring any bells for anyone?
  14. I lived in Phoenix AZ a total of 24 years and during that time I found what the local restaurants call a Green Chili Burro. I have also lived and worked in 48 states and the only ones who have them is either in Arizona, Western New Mexico or Southern California. I am now retired in Northwest Washington State. I have searched the internet for recipes and have found that none of them taste the same. I have also written to many Mexican restaurants and either did not receive a reply or was told that they could not give out the recipe. I am now going around to blogs/forums dealing with Mexican foods hoping that someone would have the actual recipe from one of the restaurants. Its not like I am going trying to compete with them since I live along way from those areas and only wish to serve it in my own household.
  15. hello ! im looking for marlin en escabeche recipe
  16. The Mexican work crew that we have moving our company are guys I know and have been great sources of tasty snacks at lunch. One of the things that surprised me was the incredibly hot guacamore they had for lunch. As hot as any salsa and they all said that was how it was supposed to be made. Dunno, I could not taste anything but peppers and I like both peppers and avocado. Anyway. The foreman told me about Macisa (his spelling). Little info so far, but it is a posole stew of sorts with varying ingredients. Can someone tell me about this? Language was a barrier as I no habla Espanol except cocina and !%#$%^&*^#@#$@.
  17. At a mexican market the other day, I bought a slab of something labeled Chicharron Prensa because it looked interesting. The butcher didn't speak english so was unable to answer any questions I had. Could someone please tell me what it is and how to use it, do you eat it plain, cook it, put it into a recipe, etc.? Thanks
  18. Does anyone know anything about a camper (not really a mobile home or a professional lunch truck) parked on the northbound side of Routes 1 & 9 in the Rahway/Woodbridge area selling Mexican food. I drove past the other day and saw it (it was pouring and I was going to fast to stop). I think maybe the sign said Macho Nacho but I thought that was the name of a restaurant in Morristown. The sign said tacos, guac, chicken with rice and beans.
  19. I've got 500grams of minced beef to use for dinner for me and to have some left for another meal. I've not been all that original with my minced beef cooking and have tended to either cook a bolognese/ragu sauce, a lasagne or a chili con carne. I've also done burgers and meat balls a couple of times. I'd like to do something different and Mexican with it. I'd love to see some ideas for what I should cook up. I have a resonable amount of stuff in the store cupboard and plenty of onions, carrots, red pepper, chili, garlic and brocoli that can be used but a small supermarket is along the road from me if I need anything else. I've also got sour cream which I wouldn't normally have in stock as i'm using it for a banana and chocolate upside down cake i found a recipe for today. any ideas please?
  20. I have some clients going to London in August and are asking for recommendations for a good Mexican restaurant. They are staying in Kensington, but anywhere in London would work. Thanks Patti
  21. We have gone a few times in the last couple of months.. It never has disappointed..Great tacos.. A little table in the back, the place is a small rectangle.. Counter running across the length where you can stand and eat your taco.. Free guacamole, free radish, free salsa verde.. Taco pastor, carnitas, pollo, cecina, lengue, they have it all..A couple of really interesting sandwiches.. The last time I was there these two guys ordered chorizo and cheese sandwiches.. It came with with lettuce, tomato, and some sauce.. Looked pretty awesome.. The tacos are $2.50 instead of the standard $2 bucks at most Mexican Places catering to Mexican's.. But you get a lot more meat then most places.. Really nice lettuce and salsa added on too.. Spinning wheels of meat are always a good sign:
  22. This is my first post! *excited We're off on a 10 day trip to Jalisco, with the majority of our time spent in a fairly remote hacienda very close to the little town of Lagos de Moreno. We will also be spending a night in Tlaquepaque right as we land, and then a few nights in Guadalajara as we end the journey. We will be driving, so hope to make day trips to surrounding town using the hacienda as our base. We'll be about 1.5 hours from Guanajuato. I would love any advice and insights on special eating experiences in Lagos de Moreno, as well as little towns between there and Guajanuato, Guadalajara and surrounds. While we are all for fancy sit down eateries, there is nothing we enjoy more than driving into little towns for their particular mercado specialty, or for a tianguis, or perhaps sampling the confectionaries or liquados or cajeta that a little village is famous for. Of course, any must-see restaurants/birrierias/cantinas in Guadalajara would be welcome to, for those evening meals and cocktails! Thank you in advance for tips!!
  23. It's kind of late to be posting this, but an email just came in from the Boston Globe announcing Pollo Campero is celebrating National Taco Day with free tacos "As food buffs know, Oct. 4 looms large on the culinary calendar --- it’s National Taco Day --- and to celebrate, the Pollo Campero chain said it is giving away free tacos at its East Boston and Chelsea restaurants." I've never had a Pollo Campero taco, so I don't know if this is worth hurrying to or not.
  24. To date I have chopped away at my blocks of Piloncillo or Panela, or shaved them with a sharp knife or even grated them. Such work. Today in a recipe for Chikki (Indian Brittle), I found a tip for using Jaggery...the Indian equivalent. Put the block into the microwave for 15 - 20 seconds and then press down and see if it crumbles. Use the microwave in increments of a few seconds until you can press down on the block and it will crumble. Be careful not to melt the sugar. So I tried it with both a block of palm sugar and panela and it works! My question is: would it harm the sugar in any way to be treated this way? I am NOT a fan of microwaves and don't use mine any more than necessary. Foolish, perhaps, but then....
  25. Pati Jinich of the Mexican Table wrote this article on Mexican casseroles. Three recipes were provided, one based on rice, another on chicken and corn tortillas, and the third on any kind or mixture of meats with a thick masa double crust. I just made the third one from cooked chicken, adding corn, rajas, black beans and cheese (hardly anything at all ) to the ingredient list. Basically the ingredients as called for are a sort of picadillo encased in masa. Casseroles are not a "Mexican" thing I guess. What's your take on this notion? Do you have any Mexican "casseroles" which you bring out regularly?
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