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sartoric

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    Gold Coast, Australia

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  1. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    Literally 20 meters around the corner from our hotel was a bar called Bond. I kid you not. It’s a standing bar, no seats, just small tables to lean against with very fresh and tasty snacks. It became our regular, being such a handy spot to stop for a cleansing ale after a long day touring around. We got stuck here a few times. Shared sashimi platter Tempura whitebait and cant remember vegetable. Tempura prawn, squid and pickled ginger In my best Scottish brogue....Bond, bar Bond.
  2. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    The market in Kyoto was larger and even more crowded than Kanazawa, with many more foreign tourists ignoring the “Do not eat and walk”. You are supposed to eat whatever you bought, at the stall you bought it from, even if that means standing in a tight space. We returned to this market more than once. Tasty things on sticks Pickled everything (taken before I noticed the no photos sign, apologised profusely, accepted gracefully). There are hundreds of restaurants within the market precinct. We chose this one, udon noodles with tempura prawns for me Chicken with noodles and leeks for him On a subsequent visit fried bean curd Someone got to try a fresh sea urchin, $20 well spent, you can taste the ozone. Matcha ice cream, love this.
  3. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    But wait, there’s more ! We spent 5 nights in Kyoto, a charming city which is definitely on the return list. This local isakaya specialises in okonomiyaki, or Japanese pizza as the owner laughingly referred to it. I want one of these giant grills ! We we had a little chicken to start... Then the okonomiyaki itself, topped with dancing shaved bonito. The outside of isakaya were easy to spot with the red lanterns signalling “open”. That didn’t always mean we’d get a seat.
  4. Well I’m on board, thanks for posting @Bhukhhad. We don’t really eat breakfast unless away travelling. Having said that, I have made poha as a side for a mix of curries, and also chickpea flour pancakes. Both delicious. Home cooking is something I’m passionate about, even more so if it’s Indian. I read a book once written by woman who advertised on Craigslist (or similar) for in home cooking lessons with Indian women. She was Canadian I think, provided the ingredients and a small fee in exchange for the lesson. I wanted to make that happen here, but stuff got in the way. So, I for one, will welcome your home style recipes with much joy.
  5. It’s just like a skillet but with only a tiny lip. Great for omelettes too. I think my pan at the cottage might be warped a bit, the breads took on more colour in the middle, it should have colour all over. Yes, they puff up gloriously.
  6. While I’m on a roll, this is a vegetable curry I made down at our country cottage last weekend. Similar to “what’s in the fridge” minestrone, I used whatever veggies I had (potatoes, cauliflower and tomatoes) and after cooking them with some typical Indian flavourings, added in some leftover “everyday okra” and leftover panchmael dal. This may be a mortal sin to the purists, but we really enjoyed it with raita, pickle and the easiest bread I’ve found. It’s like a cross between naan and chapatti, moist and delicious. To make 6, mix 250g flour (I use atta with a little plain flour), 2 tsps baking powder, a pinch of salt and 250 g plain yoghurt. Knead for a minute or so, divide, roll into 15 cm circles and throw onto a hot tava. Brush with ghee if you’re feeling decadent. This bread doesn’t look the best, I don’t have a proper tava at the cottage, so made do with a fry pan. Here’s a better piece of bread.
  7. I’m lazy and mostly use tamarind concentrate. Having said that, we have a tamarind tree. It’s only small and in a pot, but once it gets planted out in Spring and starts producing, I guess I’ll have to use it.
  8. sartoric

    Dinner 2019

    I borrowed a book from the library - Vegetarian Tajine & Couscous by Ghillie Basan. Here’s the chickpea and spinach tajine with turmeric and ginger couscous, flatbreads and a cucumber, dill and onion salad. I think I’m going to be breaking my “no new cookbooks” embargo.
  9. sartoric

    Dinner 2019

    Oh my that looks good @Ann_T, happiest of days to Moe. Dinner here last night was a potato and mixed mushroom curry with dal, rice and oven baked okra. It was someone here on eG who pointed me to the okra recipe, maybe @Okanagancook ? Anyway, we’re eternally grateful for this easy dish that works every time.
  10. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    On a day trip to Nara we were accompanied by swarms of school kids who were incredibly orderly. The weather was perfect, the sightseeing impressive, the food delicious and the deer friendly. You could have coffee with an owl (or a pussy cat). We didn’t do it, seems exploitative, but I did ask for a photo for my owl crazy niece. Lunch at a busy restaurant. The crab cake here was superb. Grilled king mushrooms, chicken teriyaki, a bowl of soup and a small plate of dressed vegetables each. Manhole covers are often works of art.
  11. sartoric

    Dinner 2019

    Udon noodle soup with veggies and sake. The sake has gold leaf in it !
  12. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    Breakfast at our Ryokan onsen was almost as special as dinner. There’s a flame under this beef. Onwards through beautifully coloured countryside to Kyoto. And these little treats, an egg batter filled with shrimp and fried in kinda mini muffin pans. Served with soup and Mitsuba. A modern day isakaya, four tables with room for say 24 at a pinch. Note the coat hangers for your jacket. Happy owner who made us very welcome Some gratuitous supermarket shots, round the corner and open 24 hours.
  13. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    @BonVivant yes we did sake tasting in two places. Didn’t get to Shirikawa-go, my motto is always save something for next time We did try the hida beef too, (even though I try not to eat animals these days which was difficult in Japan). Lovely photos.
  14. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    In Takayama we enjoyed a traditional kasakei meal served in our room. There’s so much going on here, I can’t begin to explain. First the charming lady sets out the pieces. No English to explain, but we figure it out All exquisite little bites. Then the elderly owner of the guest house gives us a box of biscuits (German, but hey) And we retire to a warm onsen, bliss.
  15. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    I think a lot of places had English menus, I didn’t always photograph them. Perhaps in our 14 days x 2 or 3 meals a day we were without an English menu maybe 7 or 8 times. Kinda made it more fun. Sorry again for the 🌽.
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