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Found 520 results

  1. Fernwood

    O Cafe NYC

    Anyone familiar with this little joint in the Village? I assume some Brazilian roots because of items like pao de queijo and brigadeiros on the menu. I would love to know about the coffee in the latte my husband brought me--such a bright flavor, not at all like typical espresso of my experience. At home in CT we have access to a pretty great local roaster with quite a range of coffees. I wish I knew about the coffee in that O Cafe latte so I could try for something similar from Willoughby's.
  2. re:brewing coffee in a press. A few years ago I saw someone from Peet's Coffee (perhaps the founder/president) on Martha Stewart and his directions were to pour a small amount of water over the grounds, stir, let sit for a minute while the grounds "bloom", stir again, then pour in the remainder of the water. I've been following this method ever since and wondered if anyone had any thoughts on it. Do you think the extra step is needed? I actually can't tell any bloomin difference in the taste but I'm bloomin well not going to change my coffee ritual now. (pardon me if this topic has been done to death before; I used the new search engine and didn't come up with anything for blooming coffee) Forget the Martha reference, it's right here. Now that I read the Peet's site, I see the stirring takes place after the remaining water is added.
  3. Just read the article at Gizmag about The AeroPress Coffee Machine: a new concept in an ancient art. Is this something anyone has bought and tried? Can you tell us about it?
  4. Mrs catdaddy has been good this year and I'm considering buying a Rancilio Silvia as a Christmas present. I know this machine gets a lot of love here, especially when outfitted with a PID. After reading many posts I'm just wondering if there is anything new (since 2013 say) I should know about the Rancilio or other great machine on the market? Also any tips about use and/or essential other tools.....like a good knock box. We've got a great grinder already.
  5. My Irish Coffee Today the children will have to forgive me, but adults also sometimes want a little pleasure. This is a recipe for people who don't have to drive a car or work, i.e. for lucky people or those who can rest at the weekend. Irish coffee is a drink made with strong coffee, Irish Whiskey, whipped cream and brown sugar. It is excellent on cold days. I recommend it after an autumn walk or when the lack of sun really gets you down. Basically, you can spike the coffee with any whiskey, but in my opinion Jameson Irish Whiskey is the best for this drink. If you don't like whiskey, instead you can prepare another kind of spiked coffee: French coffee with brandy, Spanish coffee with sherry, or Jamaican coffee with dark rum. Ingredients (for 2 drinks) 300ml of strong, hot coffee 40ml of Jameson Irish Whiskey 150ml of 30% sweet cream 4 teaspoons of coarse brown sugar 1 teaspoon of caster sugar 4 drops of vanilla essence Put two teaspoons of brown sugar into the bottom of two glasses. Brew some strong black coffee and pour it into the glasses. Warm the whiskey and add it to the coffee. Whisk the sweet cream with the caster sugar and vanilla essence. Put it gently on top so that it doesn't mix with the coffee. Enjoy your drink!
  6. I just got back from Paris, and loved the coffee in the cafes. I know it's espresso, but is there any particular brand(s) they use that would be available in the US? Any tips on making the perfect cafe creme?
  7. I am an everyday tea drinker. I came to the US 20 years ago, and gave up tea for coffeefor many years because it was too hard to find tea that didn't taste like vegetable water. My budget is basically very very low. I am laid off at the moment and trying to keep costs down. But here is what i drink, and my strategy for maximum tea, minimum budget. from the Indian Store: Brook Bond ( I think) Green Label. Green Label is Darjeeling. No flushes mentioned, but as long as it is made properly, makes a great cup of tea, for my taste. Tetley Massala Chai bags, decent but not fabulous. For real masala chai i get CTC tea, i like Taj Mahal, and boil it up with cardamom, ginger and pepper. from China Town: Keemun in a little orange tin oolong in a pretty tin (this is not good oolong, but it brews up fine for a quick cup of tea.) I also have some lychee tea in a lovely pink tin, its pretty disgusting, but it was $2 and the tin is cute. On Top of this i have the ends of a bag of Lapsang souchong, this si my favorite and I ration it out. When i get really broke i mix it with assam or something of that nature. I have a little bag of golden tippy assam also from the tea shop. its ok but not worth the money Also i have a box of barry's tea bag, irish brekfast and gold blend, because they taste like home. I always drink my tea with milk, so my choices reflect this. I only put sugar in Massala Chai, but i find that needs it. so there... there are my teas. Cheap and very basic.
  8. I buy green beans wholesale (Sumatra Mandheling), which I roast in my Jiffy hot-air popcorn maker (Full City - just at second crack). I grind in my Breville BCG800XL burr grinder to very fine. Then I brew in my Krups Type 229 Aroma Control machine with the thermocouple in the basket which drips into an insulated carafe. I've been doing this for many years. Do I need professional help? I tried what they call coffee at the corner convenience store, but it tasted like cardboard. Does that make me a snob, or a connoisseur?
  9. I hope this isn't an idiot question. But I have no idea what the differences are. Please teach me.
  10. Hi everybody- Where can I find a recipe for mit schlage? I would like to make some coffee drinks for the holidays and top them with it. I havent been able to find anything other than a basic whipped cream recipe. Thanks for all of your help.
  11. INSTEAD OF COFFEE? - MORNING GREEN COCKTAIL After waking up, most of us head towards the kitchen for the most welcome morning drink. Coffee opens our eyes, gets us up and motivates us to act. Today I would like to offer you a healthy alternative to daily morning coffee. I don't want to turn you off coffee completely. After all, it has an excellent aroma and fantastic flavor. There isn't anything more relaxing during a busy day than a coffee break with friends. In spite of the weather outside, change your kitchen for a while and try something new. My green cocktail is also an excellent way to wake up and restore energy. Add to it a pinch of curcuma powder, which brings comfort and acts as a buffer against autumn depression. Ingredients (for 2 people): 200ml of green tea 4 new kale leaves 1 green cucumber half an avocado 1 pear 1 banana pinch of salt pinch of curcuma Peel the avocado, pear and banana. Remove the core from the pear. Blend every ingredient very thoroughly. If the drink is too thick, add some green tea. Drink at once. Enjoy your drink!
  12. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for swift autumn cookies with French pastry and a sweet ginger-cinnamon-pear stuffing. Served with afternoon coffee they warm us up brilliantly and dispel the foul autumn weather. Ingredients (8 cookies) 1 pack of chilled French pastry 1 big pear 1 flat teaspoon of cinnamon 1 teaspoon of fresh grated ginger 2 tablespoons of brown sugar 1 teaspoon of vanilla sugar 2 tablespoons of milk Heat the oven up to 190C. Cover a baking sheet with some baking paper. Wash the pear, peel and cube it. Add the grated ginger, cinnamon, vanilla sugar and one tablespoon of the brown sugar. Mix them in. Cut 8 circles out of the French pastry. Cut half of every circle into parallel strips. Put the pear stuffing onto the other half of each circle. Roll up the cookies starting from the edges with the stuffing. Put them onto the baking paper and make them into cones. Smooth the top of the pastry with the milk and sprinkle with brown sugar. bake for 20-22 minutes. Enjoy your meal!
  13. I am going to have a chance to judge a professional barista and coffee brewer contest. Any suggestions for reading so I will be more knowledgeable before I get there?
  14. There have been many articles/studies published over the years regarding cafestol, a compound found in coffee, and its ability to raise cholesterol: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070614162223.htm (I'm sure you know which direction this is headed...) In a recently released study by Aarhus University Hospital, cafestol has been linked to a reduction in fasting glucose in mice. Naturally, this now means "cafestol may contribute to the reduced risk of developing T2D in coffee consumers and has a potential role as an antidiabetic drug." As of yesterday, the media is running wild with this latest breakthrough. I never went out of my way to avoid coffee that wasn't filtered through paper. But, I guess it was in the back of mind that the *occasional* extra pot of French press *might* be having some effect on my blood chemistry. As with all things, moderation is always the key. How about you? Will you break out the old percolator based on this news? Brew up a nice pot of cowboy coffee?
  15. Well it happened again. I was at a local coffee roaster and asked for their darkest roast. I got a withering glare and was informed that they only roast light. Like I had asked for a well done steak or for a vodka martini at a different type of establishment. My main espresso stand uses a pretty light roast and shares the opinion on dark roasts, although they are less supercilious about it. Pretty much every cafe in Australia uses a light roast. I'm getting used to the lighter espresso, especially when brewed well, but I kind of miss being able to go to the dark side. And I find that light roasts are often higher caffeine than I want. Is this light roast fetish an Aussie thing or is it a coffee snob thing? Or just the way they like it, thank you, nothing wrong with that? Thoughts on different roasts. Are preferences regional - is French Roast really a French thing? What do you like and why? Does it vary with brewing method? Am I terminally un-hip?
  16. The fact that I call them idiots is my opinion only. YMMV. But on this video, which attempts to show you how to brew great coffee at home, they leave out perhaps the most important thing about brewing great coffee at home. That is, if you consider what makes up about 95% of coffee important. Yes, folks, as often said on smart sites, like eGullet, and Tasty Travails, they say nothing about starting with good tasting water. (They also don't pour water through the filters first, which I also believe is important. Enjoy. https://youtu.be/IjXhQaV56GA?list=PLUeEVLHfB5-Rxp6-IYL1Xxb_SHl5FnhrQ
  17. Inspired by an exchange between Naftal and Hassouni in the winter tea thread, I thought I'd ask something different but possibly related: what coffee or tea mixtures do people make that they are either embarrassed to admit, or that they find delightfully disgusting or painful? This could be anything from plain old "I drink Folgers black every day!" to an exotic but grotesque mixed drink. I'll start: I'm about to drink my favorite disgusting infusion, Ku Ding, with a cheap bourbon whiskey, Fighting Cock. Interestingly, in my experience the aftertaste of Ku Ding easily outlasts - by a lot - hard liquor. My first experience in this genre was leaving several "nails" of Ku Ding in a bottle of Smirnoff for several days. The experience was roughly this: upon drinking, one is immediately hit with the familiar feeling of drinking Vodka, but then the extreme bitterness of the Ku Ding emerges and permeates the entire gustatory system. (Note: you may remember me from the "butter coffee" thread. Some posters reacted in horror to the idea, so I suppose that would count here as well!)
  18. What is the best way, or at least some good ways, to store whole, recently roasted, coffee beans? I've gotten the beans home and put them into ball jars, and stored them in a cabinet near the coffee grinder. I've also just put the beans into the same cabinet in the bag that they were purchased in. I usually buy 1/2-lb of each type of bean at a time, usually buying two or three varieties per trip to the seller (usually Peet's, but other local roasters as well). Are there better ways to store the beans?
  19. Since I can't ever have enough different ways to brew coffee, I got me one of these... It combines (imo) the best attributes of French press without the muddiness that sometimes comes from same. So far, after brewing with it twice, I am liking the hell out of it. rotuts will be happy to know that I ordered it from BB&B, and got 20% off ! Here's how I roll drip...
  20. I use a Hario v60 "1" size nearly every day, for myself. Hario's "1-2" cups is a bit of a joke, it's based on 150ml or 5 oz. I, and most people I know, want 8-12 oz of coffee. If I'm entertaining, there's no way for me to make more than 1 cup except make 2 smaller cups in my size 1 Hario. I'm thinking of getting either a Chemex or a larger Hario - do the latter make anything larger than size 2? And if not, does the size 2 hold enough coffee for roughly 600ml, or more? I'd like to be able to serve up to 4 people at least 8 oz, so something that holds about a litre's worth of coffee is what I want (roughly 60g coffee) I've never tried Chemex, but I'm willing to. If I don't like the results from their own filters, I've seen videos where people use Hario filters in the Chemex brewer, and just use it as a giant V60.
  21. My friend wants to find a source for GOOD quality fresh roasted coffee beans in NYC. We've tried Fairway. He likes the Kona blends. any suggestions? thanks. susan
  22. After having reasonable luck with my last batch of coffee liqueur, I was hoping that someone here could help me select a more suitable sort of bean. I don't drink a lot of coffee (it gives me indigestion), but I love the flavor in desserts and cocktails. My previous attempt used a dark roast coffee that was quite sour - sort of like what you'd find at Starbucks. The end result had a very potent coffee flavor with a less processed taste than Kahlua, but much like the raw ingredients, it was a lot more sour. I'd like to fix that. What should I look for in a roast? I wouldn't mind using a nationwide distributed variety, but being able to find something locally would be nice as they can grind it very, very fine.
  23. I know many are anti the coffee pod machines but leaving that aside what is the best system? I have had a Lavazza Modo Mia although it is now 6 years old and it is reaching the end of its life. All the reviews seem to put Nespresso top of the list with the machine I have second. I'm thinking of moving and would be interested in any views. Andrew
  24. Hi all, I'm looking at starting a new coffee/tea bar and I could really do with your help! I want to focus on a large variety of high quality tea, instead of focussing on coffees, like most other places do. Having said that, I love coffee too and will also be serving the usual americano, cappuccino etc. Tea is the second most popular drink (after water) in terms of amount consumed per day, yet costa and starbucks etc serve much more coffee than tea. What I would like to know is what would make you buy a tea (or derivative of tea) drink, or what's wrong with tea? Thanks!
  25. I recently had excellent coffee every morning at a B&B in Mexico City. The beans were from Chiapas, but the roaster does not ship to the U.S. I'm looking to hopefully get close to this coffee for my morning brew ~ does anyone have a favorite roaster that they order a Chiapas coffee from?
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