Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Breakfast'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Society Announcements
    • Announcements
    • Member News
    • Welcome Our New Members!
  • Society Support and Documentation Center
    • Member Agreement
    • Society Policies, Guidelines & Documents
  • The Kitchen
    • Beverages & Libations
    • Cookbooks & References
    • Cooking
    • Kitchen Consumer
    • Culinary Classifieds
    • Pastry & Baking
    • Ready to Eat
    • RecipeGullet
  • Culinary Culture
    • Food Media & Arts
    • Food Traditions & Culture
    • Restaurant Life
  • Regional Cuisine
    • United States
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • India, China, Japan, & Asia/Pacific
    • Middle East & Africa
    • Latin America
  • The Fridge
    • Q&A Fridge
    • Society Features
    • eG Spotlight Fridge

Product Groups

  • Donation Levels
  • Feature Add-Ons

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


LinkedIn Profile


Location

  1. When my mother recently passed away, because we are a scattered family, one of my younger brothers had the great idea of setting up a private Facebook page for the immediate family to talk in – mainly about funeral arrangements but also just in general. One topic, which I inadvertently started, was about her cooking. It’s fair to say, and she would agree, that cooking was not her forte. She was able to feed us but it was never exciting. That’s me being respectful. So we were joking amongst ourselves about that when the subject of her two most ‘original’ recipes came up and we each tried to remember exactly what was in them. Here, to the best of our ability, is what we agreed on. Pasta Mish-Mash Ingredients: Pasta. This had to be Marshall’s macaroni, a Scottish speciality and the only pasta I ever ate until I was about 18 years-old, apart from tinned spaghetti, usually in the form of spaghetti hoops. Bacon. This would normally be unsmoked Ayrshire back bacon. Not American bacon! Onions. White onions. We didn’t know they came in other colours. Tomatoes. Scottish tomatoes are surprisingly good. Salt. Common iodised table salt. You know. Natural salt. None of your fancy sea flavoured salt nonsense! Pepper. Black pre-ground and stale. Method: Boil pasta according to pack instructions. Or a bit longer if you get distracted. Drain. Cut bacon into pieces. Chop onion approximately finely. Chop tomatoes into eighths. Fry bacon and vegetables. When ready add drained pasta and mix. Apply seasoning if you remember. Even if you remember, under season. Serve. Polish Salad During WWII, around 17,000 Polish soldiers were stationed in Scotland, first temporarily in the border areas but later in east Scotland where my mother lived. (Her elder sister married one of them). Family lore has it (from my mother) that she learned this recipe from one or more of those soldiers. I’m fairly certain that there was little if anything Polish about it, but suppose its possible it was those soldiers’ attempt to recreate something from home without really knowing the recipe and having to use whatever they could find in the way of ingredients. If anyone here is Polish, of Polish descent or just knows more about Polish food than I do knows of any Polish dish that this could even vaguely resemble, I’d love to know. It was memorably distinctive - bright purple. I'm sure it glowed in the dark. Ingredients: Tomatoes Onions Apples Hard boiled eggs Pickled beetroot (store bought and pickled in malt vinegar) Heinz Tomato Ketchup Brown Sauce, preferably HP Sauce. Method: Chop all the ingredients except the ketchup and brown sauce into small pieces and mix together. Mix ketchup and brown sauce in a 50:50 ratio, and fold into the other ingredients. If too dry, add a little of the beetroot pickling liquid. Serve Father's 'recipe' coming up next.
  2. Following a long-standing tradition of simple bacon sarnie on New Year's Day. May it be a Happy One!
  3. Ellen Shapiro

    Waffles!

    I'm thinking to haul out a wedding-present-waffle-iron, never opened never used in this century, but can hardly remember anything about waffle-making. What to do? Are there tricks, tips, better and worse recipes, issues, factions, schools of thought? (Related topic: waffle irons)
  4. Couldn't find a topic devoted to sourdough discard cooking, so thought I would start one and see how much interest it would generate. Moderators, if there is a topic, please merge. Recently I have begun making sourdough bread and am caring for a sourdough starter. Since there is currently some difficulty finding flour (due to COVID-19 related supply chain issues, etc.) I don't want to throw out any of my sourdough starter. I am also following guidance from King Arthur Flour and Cooks Illustrated for working with a small sourdough starter (10 g. flour | 10 g. water | 10 g. sourdough starter) and using recipes that use smaller amounts of sourdough starter or only building my starter up if called for by a recipe. I have made the following recipes and would make them again: - King Arthur Flour sourdough discard crumpets. https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/sourdough-crumpets-recipe - King Arthur Flour sourdough discard waffles. I used a mix of yogurt & milk instead of buttermilk but otherwise made the recipe as written. https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/classic-sourdough-waffles-or-pancakes-recipe What are you doing with your sourdough discard?
  5. Does anyone know if using a high-protein flour, rather than AP flour, in a quickbread formula could create a gummy texture as a result of the protein slightly developing as it absorbs water? I was attempting to reduce water activity in the formula by using flour with 14% protein rather than 8-10% protein. Am I out in left field on this one?
  6. Have we had a serious breakfast-cereal thread yet? I know we had the retro-cereal discussion about a year ago http://forums.egullet.org/ibf/index.php?ac...t=ST&f=1&t=3161 but have we talked through all the major cereal issues? Do you like cereal? Do you add anything to it? Do you eat it for breakfast, or at other times? Do you eat it with milk? Do you use it in recipes? What are your favorites? I don't eat much cereal because it strikes me as the culinary equivalent of hanging around all day in your underwear and doing nothing (though I have been known to exhibit this behavior on occasion) but today I sampled some Special K "Red Berries." As an inexperienced cereal eater I was astounded at how sweet the stuff was. Silly me, I thought Special K was one of the non-sugary, wholesome cereals. The cereal itself is a combination of the sugar taste and some sort of vague grainy taste -- almost malt-like -- plus there are what seem to be freeze-dried strawberry slices in there. The strawberries are pretty good when reconstituted in milk. It led me to wonder whether any pastry chefs are playing with freeze dried fruit and its possibilities. But as for the cereal, it was lame and left a nasty aftertaste.
  7. Breakfast in India vs Breakfast in our homes outside India My breakfasts have varied from the time I started to cook for myself instead of just enjoying my Mother’s cooking. At first they were a mix-match of meal fixings, or just dinner leftovers. Or the good old breakfast cereal and milk. But as the years passed and I was more organized, the meals I enjoyed in my Mother’s home began to swim in my memories. And I began to prepare those for my family. However, I am no amazonian chef, so depending on the hectic nature of the days plans, I switched back and forth from convenience with taste, to elaborate and of course tasty breakfasts. We do have both vegetarian and non vegetarian foods but Indian breakfasts will mostly be vegetarian. So here are some of the things I might make: 1. Poha as in mostly ‘kande pohe’. 2. Cheela/ Pudla 3. Masala toast 4. Indian Omelette 5. Handwo piece 6. Thepla 7. Vaghareli rotli 8. Dhokla chutney 9. Idli sambhar 10. Leftover sabji 11. Muthiya 12. Khakhra 13. Upma 14. Paratha 1. Kande Pohe: The dish derives its name from Maharashtra where the Kande Pohe are celebrated as breakfast. They can of course like any breakfast, be eaten at any time. Pohe/ Poha are steamed rice grains that have been beaten flat and then again redried. So they are like Rice flakes. Except they are hand pounded, so have a knobbly texture. You get several varieties in the market. I prefer the thick white variety. 1 cup dry poha per person 1 medium onion sliced 1/2 jalapeno deseeded 1 sprig curry leaves 2 small garlic cloves 1/4 t cumin seeds 1/2 lemon 1/8 t asafoetida 1/4 t turmeric small handful of cilantro leaves 1T fresh grated coconut 2 T Peanut oil salt to taste sugar to taste In a pan heat some oil and add cumin seeds. When the seeds sputter, add sliced onions and stir. Saute on medium heat till they turn slightly browned here and there. Do not burn the onions. Meanwhile wash the Poha in a colander and drain. Do this two or three times to get rid of any dirt and also to allow them to rehydrate. They do not need soaking. Fluff the poha with a fork. Add salt sugar turmeric asafoetida and chopped cilantro. Mix and set aside. Once the onions are ready add minced garlic and chopped jalapeno along with the curry leaf sprig. Turn the heat to low and add the poha mixture. Stir to coat and to allow the turmeric and asafoetida to cook. The poha will turn mildly yellow and start giving a wonderful fragrance. Turn off the heat. Fluff gently and plate. Garnish with fresh grated coconut and a squeeze of lemon juice. Finger licking good!! Now when I make this next I will post a picture. Update: Ok I felt the urge to have Kande Pohe for tonight’s dinner. So here is a picture. I am certain to enjoy it for breakfast as well. The measurement of 1 cup poha per person is too much for one meal. But carried over to another meal thats super good! I will also have some stir fried bok choy greens made in the same kadhai after the poha was done, and some cooked and sliced beetroot for salad. My family will add some haldiram sev on the poha for extra crunch! And we will all have some chaas to round off this meal. ************* 2. Cheela/ Pudla These are essentially crepes but in the Indian style. 1/2 cup sieved garbanzo bean (Besan) flour. Water to form a thin batter 1T plain yogurt 1/2 t ginger garlic paste 1/4 or less green chili crushed 2 t heated oil * pinch asafoetida pinch turmeric salt to taste chopped cilantro (two sprigs) some ‘masala’ from a readymade pickle Method: mix the ingredients together except oil. Heat oil in a separate pan and add about 1 to 2 t of the hot oil onto the batter. It will sizzle. Use a whisk to stir thoroughly. The batter should be pouring consistency. Let the batter soak for about half an hour if possible. On a hot griddle, pour a ladle full of the batter. Turn the griddle with your wrist to spread the batter around. Cook on moderate to high flame. Flip the crepe when all the sides look like they are ready. You can add a little oil to the sides of the frying pan to make the edges crispy. In my home we usually have a Besan cheela with some yogurt its a quick and filling breakfast. You can have a small salad or fruit with it to make it more complete. Or fill the center of the cheela with some cottage cheese and fold for added creaminess! **************** 3. Masala Toast : 1 slice of bread (your choice) toasted 1/2 small red onion minced 1 medium roma tomato diced (or whatever you have) cilantro (few leaves) 1/8 t cumin (optional) 1/4 t chaat masala ( available in stores) 1 inch cube paneer 1 T peanut oil pinch turmeric (optional) Heat the oil in a pan and saute the onions. Add the tomato and cook down to mush. Crumble the paneer and add the dry spices. Stir for a few seconds to warm the paneer. Add the cilantro and though I have not written it as an ingredient, I like a few drops of lemon juice. Do not overcook paneer. I started this topic because someone asked for Indian recipes on the new forum. I don’t think they have seen any yet. I hope they find this useful. I am enjoying it. ************************** I will add recipes to the list slowly. I have to however add that after a certain ‘age’ I have now resorted to having to make sure I have three things for breakfast besides coffee: a glass of water, a small portion of fruit and a small portion of some protein not necessarily meat. Bhukkhad
  8. liuzhou

    Breakfast 2019

    First breakfast of the year, on a freezing morning. 三鲜馄饨 (sān xiān hún tún) Home made three taste wontons (pork, shrimp and shiitake) in a spicy broth. Photos taken through a filter of steam.
  9. I made a Dutch baby pancake today and on a whim I added a couple dashes of Angostura. The effect was subtle but I think improved the dish, which can be cloyingly sweet with maple syrup. Anyone else tried bitters in their bakegoods? Any thoughts?
  10. If you had the option of one breakfast in Manhattan - where would it be? Barney Greengrass?
  11. A group of us does Father's Day brunch. Previously we've gone to The Restaurant in Hackensack (great), Arthur's Landing (great; still sad about them closing), Chart House (very good). We're thinking of Essex County this year. One of the group does not like The Manor so any other interesting ideas for a really nice brunch spot?
  12. I'm flying into Newcastle with some friends next week, and spending the night in Durham before heading to the Pennines for a week. Can anyone recommend anywhere for a good breakfast? I'm thinking primarily of a good fry-up (I've only had one since I moved to Germany two years ago), but preferably somewhere where they take more care than in the average greasy spoon. And other suggestions are also very much appreciated, if the food makes a visit worthwhile. Alternatively, since we're not pushed for time and have use of a relatively well-equipped kitchen, can anyone recommend a good butcher's or other source of good-quality eggs and meat? It's years since I had a good-quality, oatmeal-based black pudding. In both cases, recommendations in easy reach (by foot) of the city centre would be much appreciated.
  13. On saturday we had a couple fairly authentic belgian waffles from La Bonte on 17th south of Sansom. The photo is one with pecans inside. The sesame seed looking things are belgian sugar. It's not pearl sugar that you will find in some places in belgium but the cook said it was another kind of belgian sugar. In belgium you get these handed to you in a little paper condom like a small fry from McNausea. It was a bit hard to cut with a knife and fork so I just picked it up in my impeccably clean fingers. They are made from a yeast dough and not a batter so the texture is not what Americans expect when you say waffle - sort of like that thing in Chicago that resembles my cat's litter box is not what I expect a pizza to be. The waffle is crispy and chewy. You don't need syrup. They have various things to work into the waffle. We also had a dark chocolate and strawberry waffle. (you see chunks of each in the waffle). I was hungry and one of them did it for me. ps I've seen reviews about awful service here. The guy with the beard who was at the counter and made our waffles was as nice as he could be. I had no complaints about the service.
  14. Has anyone tried the ebelskiver pancake pan from Williams-Sonoma? It gets insanely high ratings on their site, and I think my daughter would love them and enjoy helping make them. It is only $40, so I can't go that wrong, but I just hate specialized tools taking up space that might only be marginally used. Also, some reviews said the non-stick surface tended to flake. Here is the link. k.
  15. Hi there, I've been thinking it would be fun to make a full on Irish/English/Scottish breakfast. In particular black and white pudding. also fried egg fried tomato rasher bacon Black pudding white pudding beans Bangers Am I missing anything? What do you drink? Is there anything the equivalent of Bloody Mary/Mimosa served? I found this site that sells all sorts of puddings/bacon etc. But I really want to make the pudding myself. http://www.foodireland.com/Merchant2/merch..._Code=breakfast Would love to hear about any breakfasts you had that you liked, recipes and in particular seasonings that you could taste that you thought put the breakfast or pudding over the top. I had a black pudding recently that had a distinct allspice flavor that was great. Also, anyone know how they prepare the tomatoes? I'm assuming just fried in a pan with a little butter. Thanks Grace
  16. Okay, this July we are driving from Chicago to Cape Cod. We plan on leaving at 4AM which means that we will be hitting the Ohio border around 7AM. I think we will want a good breakfast at that point. Any suggestions for quaint, local breakfast spots just off the interstate in eastern Ohio? Thanks!
  17. I've been reading this topic on brunch over in Restaurant Life, and I keep wondering: what the hell is brunch, anyway? I surely don't have a good definition for it, and the bad definitions follow unpleasant paths (brunch is that which you have not yet sold by Sunday morning, e.g.). Googling "brunch" doesn't help, either. My favorite response is the first: Call me Amireaux and sign me up. What is this meal called brunch that you people eat?
  18. Fugu

    Brunch

    One of my apprentices, way back 18 years ago, now an exceutive chef, called me and we got to talking about among other things, buffet brunches served at her hotel. Does any of you still serve buffet brunch at your establishment? What is the current trend, if there is such a thing? Are the classical wellingtons and coulibiacs still being served? Any suggestions on how to make an exciting, cost effective buffet brunch that's uptodate with the younger crowd?
  19. Will be staying in the 2nd, near the Place de Madeline. Disappointed my last breakfast at La Duree(way too expensive, and service non existent). What other good cafe's are nearby that have wonderful breakfast pastry/cafe/ ambiance? Thanks
  20. It's possible I'm the last to hear about this trick, or perhaps it's really as clever as it seemed to me when I saw it yesterday. I was at a street fair for my son's school and one of the booths was selling pancakes. The chef/owner of the restaurant Kitchenette was cooking pancakes on a charcoal grill. Rather than using a cast-iron skillet or heavy cast-iron griddle, she had laid several inverted aluminum sheet pans over the grill and was using those as a griddle surface. The pancakes came out great, so the idea is valid at least in this application. Not-great cell-phone photo:
  21. We do brunch on the weekends a lot. Depending on who is in town, the spot changes. For casual brunch, Pancake House, Stella's, Cora's (about once a year) and dim sum. For a not-so-casual brunch, Tavern in the Park or Fort Garry. Are we missing out on any other good spots? I'd like to have a few more options.
  22. I'm having my annual Not Holiday brunch on Sunday--people just drop in and visit--we have mimosas to drink. I have to keep it do ahead because once people start arriving I can't be cooking--so I just put out a buffet table. I'm serving a ham this year and I usually make overnight French toast-- I call it Cuban French toast because the recipe is from my friend Nieves, who's Cuban--but i don't know if it actually is Cuban--but i wanted to do something different. I found this recipe in Epicurious http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/238006 haven't really looked at it yet, but the flavor combo sounds good. Or I could possibly so some sort of strata--not the traditional one, but i've seen fancier recipes for this--or maybe a fritatta or two...or a grits casserole.... I'll make a fruit platter, have some cheeses and salamis, some muffins and tea breads--but if you have anything that you make that works for you, I'm all ears! Zoe
  23. This morning we made pancakes. Last night, I decided to review all the eG Forums literature on pancakes. Unfortunately, because of dead links, print references and a lot of assumed knowledge, the old topics weren't as useful as they could have been. So, I thought we'd start fresh and try to do it right this time. I propose the following guidelines for this, the pancake topic to end all pancake topics: 1 - State your pancake formula up front. Saying "I use the recipe in Cookbook X" isn't helpful to people who don't have that cookbook. Likewise, links to recipes elsewhere are, as history demonstrates, likely to go dead at some point. So, while it's good to give credit where credit is due (a link, the name of a book), we also need to know the actual formula. We're talking about pancake recipes, so they're not complex or lengthy. Just list your ingredients and amounts. 2 - Don't assume too much knowledge. Saying "I add buttermilk," without more, isn't as useful a piece of advice as laying out your formula and specifying how much buttermilk you use, and why. 3 - Be as specific as possible about techniques, equipment and other elements of pancake cookery. For example, if you use an electric griddle, let us know which one you use, what setting you use and any other tips and tricks. 4 - Embrace the diversity of pancake styles. The pancake topic to end all pancake topics need to be ecumenical on questions of thin v. thick, wheat v. buckwheat, etc. What we should do is try to lay out the ways to do each, not argue about which is better. Make sense? Let me start with a confession: we often use Bisquick. For those of you who don't live in Bisquick nations, Bisquick is mixture of flour, leavening agents, salt and shortening -- basically all the dry ingredients for pancakes (or biscuits, or a million other things). You just add eggs and milk and you have pancake batter. I know it's not cool to use Bisquick, but, well, I'm sorry. Anyway, the formula on the Bisquick box is: 2 cups Bisquick 1 cup milk 2 eggs I've made two modifications to the recipe. First, because I have various objections to volume measures for dry ingredients, I use a scale for pretty much everything these days -- including liquid ingredients. I've also been switching over to the metric system, so my recipe card is in grams. Second, I think the pancakes come out better if you use a little more liquid than the recipe specifies. Interestingly, the simplest shorthand conversion actually makes this happen. I also am guessing that the test-kitchen recipe assumes large eggs whereas the eggs in my refrigerator are almost always extra large or jumbo. (I prefer to weigh eggs for large recipes, but for small recipes I give in to the convenience of whole-egg units.) So, when I do it, it looks like this: 250 g Bisquick 250 g milk 2 extra-large eggs This gives a slightly thinner batter than the official recipe, and the 250/250 system is really simple. Put the bowl on the scale. Tare. Add Bisquick up to 250 g. Add milk up to 500 g (or tare and go to 250). Add 2 eggs. You never even have to use a measuring cup (or two), so in the end the scale method winds up being a little bit quicker (if you always have a scale out on your counter anyway). We don't always use Bisquick. When we don't use Bisquick, however, we use the same formula but just add baking powder, salt and either oil or melted butter. In other words, 250 g of all-purpose flour, 250 g of milk, 2 extra-large eggs, plus 15 g of baking powder, 5 g of salt and 30 g of either oil or melted butter. The liquid balance of the recipe remains pretty much the same if you do it this way. Stir with a wooden spoon until most of the visible lumps are out, though it's fine if a few remain. Resting the batter for about half an hour after making it improves the pancakes in various ways. It seems to resolve any powdery spots, and they come out a little bit fluffier. But even a ten-minute rest is helpful. I know you're supposed to do this in the refrigerator, presumably for food-safety reasons, but I do it on the countertop. In terms of cooking pancakes, I don't have an electric griddle or even a stovetop griddle. I use a 12" nonstick skillet, which accommodates four pancakes made with what I would guess is 50 ml of batter each. I'm saying 50 ml because I use a 1/4 cup plastic measuring cup (which would be about 60 ml) and don't fill it quite to the top, plus because the batter is sticky some of it remains behind in the cup. I heat the skillet until drops of water dance pretty rapidly over its surface. I really should measure it with an infrared thermometer, but I don't have one. I put a pat of butter in, swirl it around, then wipe most of it out with a bunched up paper towel. This leaves enough of a film of butter to give a little flavor and help with browning, but not enough to make a mess of things. I've never been able to judge doneness by the bubbles. They help a little, but ultimately I have to life one pancake a little bit to see the color of the underside (which will eventually be the top presentation side). When it's the right golden brown, that's when I flip the pancakes. The second side cooks for much less time. My preference is to serve pancakes with a mixture of warm maple syrup and melted butter, which basically means putting maple syrup and butter in a Pyrex cup and microwaving it a little (not too much -- maple syrup will bubble over if you're not careful). Next?
  24. Four of us are going to Vegas next weekend. Is the Sterling brunch worth the money? My friend and I have good appetites, though neither one of us are caviar people. He and his wife are champagne lovers, and I wouldn't mind a couple of glasses. My wife is not a big drinker, and her interest would be in good solid breakfast foods, and pastries. Or is our $240+ better off at a casino buffet or a la carte elsewhere?
  25. We are planning a trip to NVA in a couple of weekends are are hoping to go to my sister's for breakfast on the Sunday. I'd like to find something besides WF where I can get some really good breakfast pastries to take to contribute. I know that every time I go home I spot a dozen bakeries that look interesting, but I can't remember one now! Thanks for the help!
×
×
  • Create New...