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  1. Ellen Shapiro

    Waffles!

    I'm thinking to haul out a wedding-present-waffle-iron, never opened never used in this century, but can hardly remember anything about waffle-making. What to do? Are there tricks, tips, better and worse recipes, issues, factions, schools of thought? (Related topic: waffle irons)
  2. Greetings I'm looking for a pancake recipe that inspires fluffiness, that is nice thick pancakes, but not heavy. Thin will simply not do. Flavor is not of quite as much importance. This recipe is for a contest that is graded on flavor, presentation, and fluffiness. Also, does anyone know of any exciting ways to present pancakes? Thanks a heap!
  3. Couldn't find a topic devoted to sourdough discard cooking, so thought I would start one and see how much interest it would generate. Moderators, if there is a topic, please merge. Recently I have begun making sourdough bread and am caring for a sourdough starter. Since there is currently some difficulty finding flour (due to COVID-19 related supply chain issues, etc.) I don't want to throw out any of my sourdough starter. I am also following guidance from King Arthur Flour and Cooks Illustrated for working with a small sourdough starter (10 g. flour | 10 g. water | 10 g. sourdough starter) and using recipes that use smaller amounts of sourdough starter or only building my starter up if called for by a recipe. I have made the following recipes and would make them again: - King Arthur Flour sourdough discard crumpets. https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/sourdough-crumpets-recipe - King Arthur Flour sourdough discard waffles. I used a mix of yogurt & milk instead of buttermilk but otherwise made the recipe as written. https://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/classic-sourdough-waffles-or-pancakes-recipe What are you doing with your sourdough discard?
  4. When my mother recently passed away, because we are a scattered family, one of my younger brothers had the great idea of setting up a private Facebook page for the immediate family to talk in – mainly about funeral arrangements but also just in general. One topic, which I inadvertently started, was about her cooking. It’s fair to say, and she would agree, that cooking was not her forte. She was able to feed us but it was never exciting. That’s me being respectful. So we were joking amongst ourselves about that when the subject of her two most ‘original’ recipes came up and we each tried to remember exactly what was in them. Here, to the best of our ability, is what we agreed on. Pasta Mish-Mash Ingredients: Pasta. This had to be Marshall’s macaroni, a Scottish speciality and the only pasta I ever ate until I was about 18 years-old, apart from tinned spaghetti, usually in the form of spaghetti hoops. Bacon. This would normally be unsmoked Ayrshire back bacon. Not American bacon! Onions. White onions. We didn’t know they came in other colours. Tomatoes. Scottish tomatoes are surprisingly good. Salt. Common iodised table salt. You know. Natural salt. None of your fancy sea flavoured salt nonsense! Pepper. Black pre-ground and stale. Method: Boil pasta according to pack instructions. Or a bit longer if you get distracted. Drain. Cut bacon into pieces. Chop onion approximately finely. Chop tomatoes into eighths. Fry bacon and vegetables. When ready add drained pasta and mix. Apply seasoning if you remember. Even if you remember, under season. Serve. Polish Salad During WWII, around 17,000 Polish soldiers were stationed in Scotland, first temporarily in the border areas but later in east Scotland where my mother lived. (Her elder sister married one of them). Family lore has it (from my mother) that she learned this recipe from one or more of those soldiers. I’m fairly certain that there was little if anything Polish about it, but suppose its possible it was those soldiers’ attempt to recreate something from home without really knowing the recipe and having to use whatever they could find in the way of ingredients. If anyone here is Polish, of Polish descent or just knows more about Polish food than I do knows of any Polish dish that this could even vaguely resemble, I’d love to know. It was memorably distinctive - bright purple. I'm sure it glowed in the dark. Ingredients: Tomatoes Onions Apples Hard boiled eggs Pickled beetroot (store bought and pickled in malt vinegar) Heinz Tomato Ketchup Brown Sauce, preferably HP Sauce. Method: Chop all the ingredients except the ketchup and brown sauce into small pieces and mix together. Mix ketchup and brown sauce in a 50:50 ratio, and fold into the other ingredients. If too dry, add a little of the beetroot pickling liquid. Serve Father's 'recipe' coming up next.
  5. Following a long-standing tradition of simple bacon sarnie on New Year's Day. May it be a Happy One!
  6. Does anyone know if using a high-protein flour, rather than AP flour, in a quickbread formula could create a gummy texture as a result of the protein slightly developing as it absorbs water? I was attempting to reduce water activity in the formula by using flour with 14% protein rather than 8-10% protein. Am I out in left field on this one?
  7. Have we had a serious breakfast-cereal thread yet? I know we had the retro-cereal discussion about a year ago http://forums.egullet.org/ibf/index.php?ac...t=ST&f=1&t=3161 but have we talked through all the major cereal issues? Do you like cereal? Do you add anything to it? Do you eat it for breakfast, or at other times? Do you eat it with milk? Do you use it in recipes? What are your favorites? I don't eat much cereal because it strikes me as the culinary equivalent of hanging around all day in your underwear and doing nothing (though I have been known to exhibit this behavior on occasion) but today I sampled some Special K "Red Berries." As an inexperienced cereal eater I was astounded at how sweet the stuff was. Silly me, I thought Special K was one of the non-sugary, wholesome cereals. The cereal itself is a combination of the sugar taste and some sort of vague grainy taste -- almost malt-like -- plus there are what seem to be freeze-dried strawberry slices in there. The strawberries are pretty good when reconstituted in milk. It led me to wonder whether any pastry chefs are playing with freeze dried fruit and its possibilities. But as for the cereal, it was lame and left a nasty aftertaste.
  8. My long-time Bullet gave up the ghost over the weekend and since we had a couple of free hours and were in the States...where the Walmarts are different from those in Canada...I went smoothie blender looking. We found a suitable Hamilton Beach 'Go Sport' Blender and brought it home. The specs looked good and the price was just fine. HOWEVER...two major flaws in this blender which are worth noting. 1. The blender bottle opening is quite narrow and I need a modified funnel to get my ingredients into it with ease. Rats. OK. I can do this. 2. And even worse. This unit has NO protected blending blades. That is, if you plug the unit in, put the cutting blades into the unit and turn the unit on and are being stupidly careless...as we have all been known to be...you can get your fingers cut to ribbons!! (No, I did not do it. Yet.) Now, the directions do tell you THE safe way to use the blender...but they don't make any reference to the fact that you...OR MORE IMPORTANTLY, A CHILD...could massacre their fingers in this unit. I was really surprised. I can't recall the last electrical kitchen appliance which was so open to misuse and accident. Almost all must have all the protective units in place before the blades will even work. You'd have to do something truly unusual to hurt yourself using one. (OK. Go ahead. Post all the exceptions to my statement. ) I post this just in case.
  9. Hello Egullet family.. its good to be back on here, been away for a while, i hope to find some new trending recipes .. and be ready to get some African dish recipes for those who love African Dishes, You can Read and  Download  Mp3 Audios here of some Nigerian dishes, and there are more coming in which i would be placing on here.. Thanks
  10. Raspberry porridge Today, I used the best part of my raspberry shopping for my summer second breakfast. I recommend it for those who only drink coffee in the morning. The rolled oats and chia seeds ensure that it satisfies our hunger very well, and the empty bowl means that you are sorry the dish was so small. The inspiration for this dish comes from "Smaki życia" ("Flavour of Life") by Agnieszka Maciąg. Ingredients: 100g of raspberries 3 teaspoons of honey 3 tablespoons of rolled oats 2 teaspoons of chia seeds decoration 3 teaspoons of natural yoghurt raspberries, blueberries, banana slices, cashews, sesame seeds Mix together the rolled oats with the chia seeds, pour in some hot water and leave for 20 minutes. Wash the raspberries and drain them. Leave a few nice bits of fruit for decoration. Blend the rest of the raspberries with the rolled oats, chia seeds and honey. Put it into a small bowl. Put the natural yoghurt on top. Decorate with the banana slices, blueberries, raspberries, sesame seeds and cashews.
  11. Omelette with courgette and tomato salsa. Today I added a bit of chili pepper to tomato-basil salsa. Because it was quite spicy I decided to add it to a mild dish. I prepared an omelette with courgette and goat cheese. The salsa added an excellent piquancy to it. I recommend this dish for a fast and light meal. Ingredients: omelette 3 eggs 150g of courgette 3-4 slices of goat cheese 2 tablespoons of milk 1 tablespoon of flour 1 tablespoon of butter salt and pepper salsa 2 tomatoes 3 tablespoons of minced basil quarter of an onion 2 cloves of garlic half a chili pepper 3 tablespoons of olive oil 2 tablespoons of lemon juice 1 teaspoon of honey Start by preparing the salsa. Cube the tomato and dice the garlic, onion and chili pepper. Mix the vegetables together. Make a sauce with the olive oil, lemon juice and honey. Add it to the vegetables and mix it in. Leave in the fridge. Slice the courgette very thin. Whisk the eggs with the milk and add the flour. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Melt the butter in a pan. Pour half the egg mass into it and fry for a while at medium heat. Arrange half of the courgette slices on top along with the slices of goat cheese and the rest of the courgette. Pour the rest of the egg mass onto it and fry it. When the eggs have congealed, turn the omelette upside down and fry for a few seconds. Serve at once with the tomato salsa. Enjoy your meal!
  12. Holiday brunch. During the holiday, eating is a waste of time for my children. Although breakfast should be a balanced and calm meal, at this time it is eaten quickly and carelessly. Sometimes I need to wrest my children away from their play and nourish their young bodies with brunch. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for a very simple egg and vegetable brunch. Though my children like all vegetables, the look of the food made them anxious. Only the soft boiled eggs settled them down and got them eating. After a while there were two empty glasses in the dishwasher and my children could go back to playing. It was good, because the holiday is almost over. Ingredients (for 3 people) half an onion 2 cloves of garlic 1 tablespoon of butter 300g of courgette 1 red pepper 2 tomatoes 2 sprigs of rosemary 2 sprigs of thyme 3 tablespoons of minced chives 3 eggs Dice the onion and garlic and fry them in butter. Remove the core from the tomatoes. Cube the courgette, tomatoes and red pepper. Put one of the cubed tomatoes to one side. Add the second tomato and the rest of the vegetables to the onion and stew on a low heat for 10 minutes. Boil some water and carefully put the eggs into the water. Boil for 5 minutes. Cool them down and carefully remove the shell. Mix the stewed vegetables in with the rest of the tomato. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Put the vegetables into a cup. Arrange the eggs on top and cut them up with a sharp knife. Spice up the egg with salt and pepper and sprinkle with the chives. Serve at once. Enjoy your meal!
  13. As far as I understand, noodles are a common breakfast dish throughout south-east Asia. Curry laksa, for example, is a breakfast noodle dish in Penang, Malaysia; commonly called curry mee by the locals. This is just one example I know of first hand, but I'm certain there are many others. Do you know of other breakfast noodle dishes? Or books on the subject? Keep in mind that I'm interested in noodle dishes specifically, not just any type of breakfast. I'll keep that broader topic for a different thread.
  14. Breakfast has become a problem at our house. We no longer get up at the same time and we no longer eat the same things every day for breakfast. So I have been searching for power/nutrition/energy/granola/health/power/etc bars to make for me to eat. DH doesn't eat them. Well, not at breakfast anyway. Recently a new cookbook, Power Hungry: The Ultimate Energy Bar Cookbook by Camilla V. Saulsbury has come out and I have started making a few of the bars in it. Some are excellent, some not wonderful, others way too sweet for me. The first section contains recipes for well-known "knock-offs". The only commercial bar we've tried is a Clif bar and both thought it was awful. I suspect that most of them are too sweet for our personal tastes. (To generalize wildly: Canadians are less addicted to sugar than Americans...more addicted to salt.) The book includes recipes for vegans and for folks who can't tolerate gluten. Lots of variations given with each recipe. I am proposing to go through the entire book of 30 recipes, making one after another, to find the ones which suit me. I'll report back on this. (Give me a purpose for surviving this horrible cold winter. ) Maybe someone else has the book, has tried some recipes, and is interested in this. Saulsbury also has a blog, http://powerhungry.com/ , in which she has posted some bars which are not in the book. I haven't figured out exactly which ones are repeated in the book yet. Should have added Europeans generally like less sugar than do Americans. Don't know about Aussies or other countries...
  15. I made a Dutch baby pancake today and on a whim I added a couple dashes of Angostura. The effect was subtle but I think improved the dish, which can be cloyingly sweet with maple syrup. Anyone else tried bitters in their bakegoods? Any thoughts?
  16. Chelseabun

    Fake Bacon

    Does anyone have a recipe for Fake Bacon please? I have been vegetarian now for about 3 months. So far it is going very well and I am looking to widen my range of recipes without meat. I am not sure that going down the path of making imitation meets is the best approach but I do enjoy vegetarian soy based sausages and mince (ground beef) - So perhaps an imitation bacon will be good too. If you have any favourite recipes for fake bacon that you wish to share, that would be appreciated. Regards
  17. After a delightful brunch at Koslow's Sqirl restaurant in Los Angeles, I've decided to attempt to cook through her cookbook. I'll post my results here. Please follow along and join in, if you're so inclined. Her food is wonderful, but I will surmise that her true deliciousness comes from using the best and freshest ingredients. I'll do my best to recreate the magic I felt at Sqirl. Here's the link to her book at Eat Your Books.
  18. ALMOND CUSCUS WITH CRANBERRIES AND PINEAPPLE I hate getting up in the morning. My household knows that before 8 o'clock I'm unbearable, and because almost every day I wake up much earlier, I tend to be unbearable more frequently than I want. Every extra five minutes of sleep is priceless, so I appreciate a good breakfast that is not too complicated and is quick to prepare. Recently, I have been preparing breakfast with groats and flakes. This time I chose cuscus. This product is a cross between pasta and groats, and it doesn't need long to prepare. It is enough to add hot water or milk and leave for a few minutes. I added some fresh pineapple, cranberries and banana. I spiced it up with some hot chili pepper . Ingredients (for 2 people) 125g of cuscus 400ml of almond milk 1 tablespoon of honey 1 teaspoon of vanilla essence 2 slices of fresh pineapple 1 teaspoon of minced chili pepper 150g of fresh cranberries 2 tablespoons of brown sugar 1 banana 4 tablespoons of flaked almonds Wash the cranberries and put them into a pot. Add two tablespoons of water and the brown sugar. Boil, stirring gently until the cranberries burst and the sauce has thickened. Boil the almond milk with the vanilla essence. Pour the milk onto the cuscus and leave for 5-7 minutes. Slice the banana and roast the almond flakes. Peel the pineapple and dice it. Mix the pineapple, chili pepper and honey. Add the pineapple to the cuscus and mix it in. Put the mixture into two bowls. Put the cranberries and banana on the top and sprinkle with the almond flakes. Enjoy your meal!
  19. LUNCH FROM THE JAR, I.E. LAYERED SALAD IN THE OFFICE Most of us take lunch boxes to the office. Some lucky people can warm their food up at work The rest have to eat sandwiches. Sandwiches are great, but even if we absolutely love them we could get fed up with them in the end. Regardless of where we work we can save the situation with salads. Every day we can prepare a different one and we have an entirely new lunch. If we also take an attractive dish, we have something that is not only tasty but also glamorous. I would like to share with you the recipe for a salad which looks equally as beautiful as it is yummy. The chickpeas and groats make it a satisfying and balanced meal, after which we won't be hungry. I think that if you prepare your lunch in the morning and plan to eat it at lunchtime, we should keep the salad and the dip separately. Otherwise, after a few hours in the jar, we have an unappetising dish with squishy lettuce, which isn't what we want, is it? Ingredients (for 2 people) 1 beetroot 200g of tinned chickpeas 100g of bulgur 1 carrot 1 fresh green pepper 4 lettuce leaves 200g of natural yoghurt handful of minced chives 1 small chili pepper salt and pepper Clean the beetroot and bake or boil it. Grate the beetroot and carrot. Cut the pepper into thin strips. Boil the bulgur in salty water. Arrange in layers in a jar the beetroot, chickpeas, pepper, bulgur, carrot and lettuce. Dice the chili pepper. Mix the natural yoghurt with the chives and chili pepper. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Add the dip to the salad just before serving.
  20. George Jetson, this one's for you: https://thespoon.tech/the-founder-of-reviewed-com-wants-to-reinvent-cooking-with-robot-cooking-appliance/
  21. I developed this recipe for a friend who wound up with many cans of Solo brand apricot filling and was wondering what to make with them. I adapted this recipe from Rose Levy Beranbaum's Sour Cream Coffee Cake, found on page 90 of the Cake Bible. The apricot filling works it way down through the cake and winds up near the bottom of the pan, making an attractive top later when the cake is inverted. Please use some sort of ring pan that holds at least 9 cups. You may substitute butter for the toasted almond oil, but remember that the oil adds flavor. I specifically developed this recipe with the home cook in mind, regular salted butter, and AP flour work well here. To reduce the sodium, use unsalted butter. Ingredients 113 grams (1 stick) salted butter 26 grams toasted almond oil 200 grams sugar 6 grams vanilla extract 4 egg yolks 160 grams regular sour cream (do not use low fat or fat free) 50 grams almond meal 175 grams all-purpose flour 2 1/2 grams baking powder 2 1/2 grams baking soda 12 ounces (1 can) Solo Apricot Filling 12 Servings Preheat the oven to 350° Spray a 9+ cup tube or Bundt pan with non-stick spray or grease with an oil & soy lecithin blend. Lightly toast the almond meal in a frying pan on the stove top until it has a light beige color and has a mild fragrance. Allow to cool. Cream together the butter, oil, and sugar. Add the vanilla and egg yolks, mix until the mixture is even and creamy. Add the sour cream and mix well. Add the cooled almond flour and mix well. Sift together the flour, baking powder and baking soda. Add the dry ingredients to the liquid mixture and mix until it everything is evenly incorporated. Do not overmix the batter. Place 2/3 of the batter evenly in the prepared pan. Place the apricot filling in an even layer on top, keeping a small space between the filling and the pan's edges. Place the remaining batter on top and smooth to create a relatively even surface. Bake for approximately 50 minutes at 350° or until the top is dark brown and springs back to a light touch. Allow to cool for 15 minutes. Invert the pan onto a serving plate. Cool and serve. Be cautious about serving this hot, as the apricot filling can cause serious burns. When fully cooled, cover or wrap in plastic wrap to store. Will keep for several days in a cool, dry place. Nutrition (thanks MasterCook!) 324 calories, 15g fat, (7g sat fat, 6g mono-unsat fat, 1g ploy-unsat fat), 5g protein, 43g carbohydrates, 175mg sodium, 101mg potassium, 58g calcium 42% calories from fat, 52% calories from carbohydrates, 6% calories from protein
  22. Breakfast in India vs Breakfast in our homes outside India My breakfasts have varied from the time I started to cook for myself instead of just enjoying my Mother’s cooking. At first they were a mix-match of meal fixings, or just dinner leftovers. Or the good old breakfast cereal and milk. But as the years passed and I was more organized, the meals I enjoyed in my Mother’s home began to swim in my memories. And I began to prepare those for my family. However, I am no amazonian chef, so depending on the hectic nature of the days plans, I switched back and forth from convenience with taste, to elaborate and of course tasty breakfasts. We do have both vegetarian and non vegetarian foods but Indian breakfasts will mostly be vegetarian. So here are some of the things I might make: 1. Poha as in mostly ‘kande pohe’. 2. Cheela/ Pudla 3. Masala toast 4. Indian Omelette 5. Handwo piece 6. Thepla 7. Vaghareli rotli 8. Dhokla chutney 9. Idli sambhar 10. Leftover sabji 11. Muthiya 12. Khakhra 13. Upma 14. Paratha 1. Kande Pohe: The dish derives its name from Maharashtra where the Kande Pohe are celebrated as breakfast. They can of course like any breakfast, be eaten at any time. Pohe/ Poha are steamed rice grains that have been beaten flat and then again redried. So they are like Rice flakes. Except they are hand pounded, so have a knobbly texture. You get several varieties in the market. I prefer the thick white variety. 1 cup dry poha per person 1 medium onion sliced 1/2 jalapeno deseeded 1 sprig curry leaves 2 small garlic cloves 1/4 t cumin seeds 1/2 lemon 1/8 t asafoetida 1/4 t turmeric small handful of cilantro leaves 1T fresh grated coconut 2 T Peanut oil salt to taste sugar to taste In a pan heat some oil and add cumin seeds. When the seeds sputter, add sliced onions and stir. Saute on medium heat till they turn slightly browned here and there. Do not burn the onions. Meanwhile wash the Poha in a colander and drain. Do this two or three times to get rid of any dirt and also to allow them to rehydrate. They do not need soaking. Fluff the poha with a fork. Add salt sugar turmeric asafoetida and chopped cilantro. Mix and set aside. Once the onions are ready add minced garlic and chopped jalapeno along with the curry leaf sprig. Turn the heat to low and add the poha mixture. Stir to coat and to allow the turmeric and asafoetida to cook. The poha will turn mildly yellow and start giving a wonderful fragrance. Turn off the heat. Fluff gently and plate. Garnish with fresh grated coconut and a squeeze of lemon juice. Finger licking good!! Now when I make this next I will post a picture. Update: Ok I felt the urge to have Kande Pohe for tonight’s dinner. So here is a picture. I am certain to enjoy it for breakfast as well. The measurement of 1 cup poha per person is too much for one meal. But carried over to another meal thats super good! I will also have some stir fried bok choy greens made in the same kadhai after the poha was done, and some cooked and sliced beetroot for salad. My family will add some haldiram sev on the poha for extra crunch! And we will all have some chaas to round off this meal. ************* 2. Cheela/ Pudla These are essentially crepes but in the Indian style. 1/2 cup sieved garbanzo bean (Besan) flour. Water to form a thin batter 1T plain yogurt 1/2 t ginger garlic paste 1/4 or less green chili crushed 2 t heated oil * pinch asafoetida pinch turmeric salt to taste chopped cilantro (two sprigs) some ‘masala’ from a readymade pickle Method: mix the ingredients together except oil. Heat oil in a separate pan and add about 1 to 2 t of the hot oil onto the batter. It will sizzle. Use a whisk to stir thoroughly. The batter should be pouring consistency. Let the batter soak for about half an hour if possible. On a hot griddle, pour a ladle full of the batter. Turn the griddle with your wrist to spread the batter around. Cook on moderate to high flame. Flip the crepe when all the sides look like they are ready. You can add a little oil to the sides of the frying pan to make the edges crispy. In my home we usually have a Besan cheela with some yogurt its a quick and filling breakfast. You can have a small salad or fruit with it to make it more complete. Or fill the center of the cheela with some cottage cheese and fold for added creaminess! **************** 3. Masala Toast : 1 slice of bread (your choice) toasted 1/2 small red onion minced 1 medium roma tomato diced (or whatever you have) cilantro (few leaves) 1/8 t cumin (optional) 1/4 t chaat masala ( available in stores) 1 inch cube paneer 1 T peanut oil pinch turmeric (optional) Heat the oil in a pan and saute the onions. Add the tomato and cook down to mush. Crumble the paneer and add the dry spices. Stir for a few seconds to warm the paneer. Add the cilantro and though I have not written it as an ingredient, I like a few drops of lemon juice. Do not overcook paneer. I started this topic because someone asked for Indian recipes on the new forum. I don’t think they have seen any yet. I hope they find this useful. I am enjoying it. ************************** I will add recipes to the list slowly. I have to however add that after a certain ‘age’ I have now resorted to having to make sure I have three things for breakfast besides coffee: a glass of water, a small portion of fruit and a small portion of some protein not necessarily meat. Bhukkhad
  23. liuzhou

    Breakfast 2019

    First breakfast of the year, on a freezing morning. 三鲜馄饨 (sān xiān hún tún) Home made three taste wontons (pork, shrimp and shiitake) in a spicy broth. Photos taken through a filter of steam.
  24. We started importing a great chocolate and there are many good Mexican chocolates out there (oK, a few) like Mayordomo. WHat's the best way to make this drink. My memory from Mexican visits is that's it's a thickish drink, almost a gruel, with masa and chocolate. I just received the book Muy Bueno, which makes all sorts of claims about authenticity and traditionalism (danger signs, in my mind) and the recipe for champurrado is almost like a thinner than thin chocolate milk. What is the way to make it from somewhere like Oaxaca or Chiapas? (This book is pretty and well-intentioned but it's really about Mexicano-American food from a Texas family. It's not Tex Mex, it's close to Norteño but it's not all that interesting or essential. The thin champurrado and the fact that the chiles aren't toasted makes me not want to explore the rest of the book much)
  25. Potato Pancakes with Smoked Salmon and Fried Eggs Serves 4 as Main Dish. Hands-on time: 25 minutes Total preparation time: 35 minutes I love smoked salmon with eggs. I love smoked salmon with potatoes and smoked salmon with horseradish. So I thought I would put it all together and garnish it with the perfect smoked salmon accompaniments, red onion and capers. I'm from New York -- I know about smoked salmon. Serve with Grated Carrot Salad (page 293) or Sauteed Beets with Balsamic Vinegar (page 305). 1—2 small baking potatoes (about 12 ounces) 1/4 c plus 2 tablespoons vegetable oil Kosher salt and freshly milled black pepper 8 large eggs 4 oz thinly sliced smoked salmon 1 recipe Horseradish Sauce (page 316), optional Thinly sliced red onion and drained, bottled capers, optional 1. Peel the potato and grate it, preferably using the grating disc of a food processor (or the coarse side of a box grater). Heat 3 tablespoons oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Sprinkle the potatoes into the pan to form 4 pancakes, about 4 inches in diameter and 1/3 inch thick. Press them down with a spatula and cook them for 5 to 6 minutes or until the underside is golden brown. Season the top side with salt and pepper, turn the pancakes over, and cook them for 5 to 6 minutes more or until golden. Season the second side with salt and pepper. 2. When the potato pancakes are almost done, fry the eggs. In a large skillet heat the remaining oil over medium-low heat until hot. Gently break the eggs into the skillet, keeping the yolks intact, and cook, covered, 5 minutes, or to desired doneness. Season with salt and pepper. 3. To serve, arrange 1 pancake on each of 4 plates; top with one-fourth of the salmon and 2 fried eggs. Spoon some of the Horseradish Sauce on top, if using, and garnish with red onion and capers. Excerpted from Sara's Secrets for Weeknight Meals, published by Broadway Books and reprinted with permission. Copyright © 2005 by Sara Moulton. Pages referenced in this recipe are from the book. Click here for a discussion of potato pancakes and a picture of this dish. Keywords: Main Dish, Lunch, Intermediate, Dinner, Potatoes, Fish, Brunch ( RG1574 )
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