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Dinner 2017 (Part 6)


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Our dinner was a pork shoulder stew with green chilis, onions, apples and lime juice. I took a picture of it without the broth because I thought it would look better that way. We added the broth before we ate it.  Second picture is the leftovers with the broth. Apples float. Pork doesn't.

20170918_172132.jpg

20170918_174104.jpg

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Okay, I know that this is not a great photo, but OMG this was soooo goood.

Duck Breasts in a port and fig sauce served with braised red cabbage, mashed potatoes and steam green beans.

It has been a while since I made this Duck Breast recipe. I forgot just how good it is.

 

59c0814242460_DuckBreastSeptember18th20171.thumb.jpg.7bfa5bf5968ce0f24ab35b02b9711f36.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

Okay, I know that this is not a great photo, but OMG this was soooo goood.

Duck Breasts in a port and fig sauce served with braised red cabbage, mashed potatoes and steam green beans.

It has been a while since I made this Duck Breast recipe. I forgot just how good it is.

 

59c0814242460_DuckBreastSeptember18th20171.thumb.jpg.7bfa5bf5968ce0f24ab35b02b9711f36.jpg

How do you do the port and fig sauce?

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3 hours ago, Duvel said:

Looks great, HC!

 

Care to share crust recipe and cooking temp/time ?

https://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/recipe-neapolitan-pizza-dough/

 

When I set out to make pizza dough, I use Peter Reinhart's method, above,  but just as often, I will buy a pound of dough at Walmart for 89 cents.
I usually have at least one in the freezer, and will micro it back to life a few hours before dinner. The most important thing I have learned is to get

the dough up to room temp and knead it out into a pizza shape over the course of several attempts, keeping it covered with a heavy cloth, in between

sessions to keep the moisture in, until it will accept being spread out as thin as you want, without springing back. Then, I transfer it onto a pizza peel

that has been well coated with corn meal that acts as little ball bearings when it's time to slide it into the oven.

I have a piece of 1/4 " steel plate (6.35 mm) that I had cut out of scrap steel, to fit my oven, at a local steel fabrication business, that I use as a pizza stone.

IMG_0629.thumb.JPG.560d35ece6d8e603c3f05b6acbbc8453.JPG

 

My old electric oven would get up to 550 F and would bake a perfect thin crust pizza in 11 minutes. My current gas oven will only get up to 475 F and will take 14 minutes for that same pizza. I preheat the oven for 45 minutes after it has reached 475 F to ensure the steel is up to speed. This clam pizza is made as follows:
Put about 3 TBS olive oil on the dough and spread out with a pastry brush.
Sprinkle the entire crust liberally, with 5 cloves of finely chopped garlic.
I used about a dozen medium sized clams (they are called middle necks around here), that I had opened, drained and chopped.
1 cup of finely grated Parmazon cheese
1/2 TBS each of dried oregano and basil
Slide the pie onto the pizza steel and bake for 14 minutes (my oven, maybe not yours), but you want the brown highlights around the crust.

Top it with a handful of chopped fresh basil.

HC


 

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Been busy around here doing fall cleaning, getting ready for our hunter dealing with some late produce from the garden etc.  A couple of quick meals this week.  

 

Spaghetti red

IMG_3752.JPG.c39688e96b04451e0af197120ffd6617.JPG

And roast beef sandwiches

 

IMG_3772.JPG.bb89f2137ca8c2928829414217136d0e.JPG

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@Shelby – thanks for the peeling tip.  I’ll give it a try!

 

@Ann_T – thanks for the link to the recipe.  I am always looking for recipes using dried figs.  I adore fresh figs, but the season is so short and they are so perishable that I can’t make all the figgy things I want with fresh ones.

 

Yesterday I made some Food TV Sweet Chili and corn muffins to take to the family of a friend who injured herself:

DSCN7508.JPG.20219c834d52ecfc0057234141dc3df6.JPG

 

DSCN7509.JPG.e0a25197e3961c195b1cdfecad2b394a.JPG

 

Dinner last night started with the inevitable salad:

DSCN7510.JPG.67c61e3efd2028480f9af82047eabf3b.JPG

 

And then a bit of serendipity – pork chops with wine and garlic:

DSCN7511.JPG.e12e77658677d8d2813d2d5bd2943437.JPG

Yesterday morning the grocery store had these enormous, thick pork chops on sale – I got two 1 1/2-inch thick chops for $4.  I put them in a brine like I always do grocery store pork as soon as I got home.  I happened to watch “The Pioneer Woman” later and she did these chops.  They were delicious.  A little too salty, though.  I think that I brined for too long.  They were in there for about 6 hours.  I’ve done some research and most folks recommend one hour per pound.  Not sure how much these weighed, but nowhere near 6 lbs.   What say you all?  I did rinse them off before cooking.

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Supermarket pork is often pre-brined, too, which doesn't help. 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Last night we went out to a friend's newish restaurant.  Basically it's a build your own poke bowl.  You get a choice of base (white or brown rice, romaine or spring mix) and includes a scoop of crab or poke (spicy raw tuna).  To that you can 1-4 scoops of protein, like maguro, sake, hamachi, etc., which were my three choices. Then you can choose from a huge variety of toppings (I chose just avocado) and a dressing from a list of nine or so.  I chose unagi sauce.  They also do a roll they call a Brito and they also have Donburi.  The place is called Kanpai Poke and it's in Danville CA for those that are local.  Very inexpensive too.   Didn't take any pictures but I did shoot my dessert:

 

pb-ban-chips.jpg.c0ad8f49938cd494aebc19ca13b59895.jpg

 

Homemade dairy-free ice cream.  Peanut Butter-Banana with hand chopped dark chocolate bits.

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Mark

My eG Food Blog

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After 80 days of searing heat, (for Spokane) with no rain, finally Fall weather has arrived.  Which for me is a blessing as it's my favorite time of year for cooking.  This is the third batch of duck confit I've made so far.  This time served with a Cassoulet Bean Stew I came up with.  The beans are from our friends at Rancho Gordo.

Duck Confit.JPG

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12 hours ago, David Ross said:

After 80 days of searing heat, (for Spokane) with no rain, finally Fall weather has arrived.  Which for me is a blessing as it's my favorite time of year for cooking.  This is the third batch of duck confit I've made so far.  This time served with a Cassoulet Bean Stew I came up with.  The beans are from our friends at Rancho Gordo.

 

Ditto for W. Montana.  It's been a very long, hot and dry summer and I'm done with it.

I can't wait to cook soups, stews and braises and roasts!!!!

It's my favorite time for cooking and I'm ready!

Edited by lindag (log)
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5 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

@Shelby – thanks for the peeling tip.  I’ll give it a try!

 

@Ann_T – thanks for the link to the recipe.  I am always looking for recipes using dried figs.  I adore fresh figs, but the season is so short and they are so perishable that I can’t make all the figgy things I want with fresh ones.

 

Yesterday I made some Food TV Sweet Chili and corn muffins to take to the family of a friend who injured herself:

DSCN7508.JPG.20219c834d52ecfc0057234141dc3df6.JPG

 

DSCN7509.JPG.e0a25197e3961c195b1cdfecad2b394a.JPG

 

Dinner last night started with the inevitable salad:

DSCN7510.JPG.67c61e3efd2028480f9af82047eabf3b.JPG

 

And then a bit of serendipity – pork chops with wine and garlic:

DSCN7511.JPG.e12e77658677d8d2813d2d5bd2943437.JPG

Yesterday morning the grocery store had these enormous, thick pork chops on sale – I got two 1 1/2-inch thick chops for $4.  I put them in a brine like I always do grocery store pork as soon as I got home.  I happened to watch “The Pioneer Woman” later and she did these chops.  They were delicious.  A little too salty, though.  I think that I brined for too long.  They were in there for about 6 hours.  I’ve done some research and most folks recommend one hour per pound.  Not sure how much these weighed, but nowhere near 6 lbs.   What say you all?  I did rinse them off before cooking.

If you use equilibrium brining then there is  no risk of over salting.  But, yes it could have been brined by the store to make it weigh more.

How to do it, weigh the meat and all the water you use so it is covered then add 2 to 3 percent salt.  It can stay in there overnight if need be.

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17 hours ago, HungryChris said:

https://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/recipe-neapolitan-pizza-dough/

 

When I set out to make pizza dough, I use Peter Reinhart's method, above,  but just as often, I will buy a pound of dough at Walmart for 89 cents.
I usually have at least one in the freezer, and will micro it back to life a few hours before dinner. The most important thing I have learned is to get

the dough up to room temp and knead it out into a pizza shape over the course of several attempts, keeping it covered with a heavy cloth, in between

sessions to keep the moisture in, until it will accept being spread out as thin as you want, without springing back. Then, I transfer it onto a pizza peel

that has been well coated with corn meal that acts as little ball bearings when it's time to slide it into the oven.

I have a piece of 1/4 " steel plate (6.35 mm) that I had cut out of scrap steel, to fit my oven, at a local steel fabrication business, that I use as a pizza stone.

IMG_0629.thumb.JPG.560d35ece6d8e603c3f05b6acbbc8453.JPG

 

My old electric oven would get up to 550 F and would bake a perfect thin crust pizza in 11 minutes. My current gas oven will only get up to 475 F and will take 14 minutes for that same pizza. I preheat the oven for 45 minutes after it has reached 475 F to ensure the steel is up to speed. This clam pizza is made as follows:
Put about 3 TBS olive oil on the dough and spread out with a pastry brush.
Sprinkle the entire crust liberally, with 5 cloves of finely chopped garlic.
I used about a dozen medium sized clams (they are called middle necks around here), that I had opened, drained and chopped.
1 cup of finely grated Parmazon cheese
1/2 TBS each of dried oregano and basil
Slide the pie onto the pizza steel and bake for 14 minutes (my oven, maybe not yours), but you want the brown highlights around the crust.

Top it with a handful of chopped fresh basil.

HC


 

 

HungryChris,

 

Frank Pepe would be proud, and your clam pizza looks so good!

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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