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chromedome

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Everything posted by chromedome

  1. After said incident, you are just plain "less sanguine."
  2. chromedome

    Breakfast 2022

    LOL "Two people and a truffle" doesn't inspire quite the same degree of sympathy as "two people and a ham."
  3. If I'm being honest, my frequent inability to cough up the actual name of a given kitchen implement (never mind a fanciful one) is a reason I prefer to be alone in the kitchen.
  4. I remember the attendant at the window pushing books about astronauts and the moon landing (I started school in '69). I had those books for years; they were from Rand-McNally IIRC.
  5. I was speaking figuratively. Forks get soaked in hot water, bones for stock get simmered in hot water...It didn't feel like *that* much of a stretch. The full, explicit, non-figurative version goes like this: Buy a chicken, and cook it (unless it's a rotisserie chicken, in which case that step gets skipped). Eat some portion of the chicken. I strip the bones pretty aggressively, GF does not (and it's always just the two of us). Debone the remaining part of the chicken, which typically leaves shreds of meat and all the cartilage in place, especially at the joints. I keep back the wingtips for this and the neck as well, if I have cooked the chicken myself, but not the giblets (cook's treat!). Bung the bones - still well furnished for the most part, rather bare and gnawed in the case of those that had been on my plate - into the IP, with a bit of mirepoix, a bay leaf, some garlic, and a pinch of salt. Other herbs may or may not go in as well, depending on my plans for the resulting broth. Push the button, walk away.
  6. Yes...like the chicken bones, they spend some time in very hot water first.
  7. I also used "gnawed" bones when I'm making my stock in the IP, though not when I'm simmering on the stovetop. It's always immediately after the meal, so if the chicken was food-safe to begin with (an assumption one makes, if one is to eat the damned thing) there's very little time for any pathogen to reproduce on the bones, and pressure-cooking will put the kibosh on that pretty quickly. As far as the whole "been in someone's mouth" aspect of it goes, well...as pointed out in a previous discussion here, so have the forks in your drawer.
  8. Another one that's mostly aimed at the back of the house, as it were. Various bulk dry-goods from a specific wholesaler are being recalled for salmonella (due to rodent infestation, yet!). The wholesaler seems to primarily serve the African diaspora, so that would be your only real way to guess where the products had been used/resold. The products were sold from Ontario to BC, but may have ended up in the other provinces as well. https://recalls-rappels.canada.ca/en/alert-recall/various-food-products-recalled-due-possible-salmonella-contamination-rodent?utm_source=r_listserv
  9. https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo24045005.html
  10. Gave it a Red Bull?
  11. Gluten-free *AND* high-fibre.
  12. It would probably be good, but I don't know that it would scratch that same itch. Celery has that juicy crunch, like apples, and that's what I'm craving when I eat it. I do occasionally buy a smidge of cambozola when I see it on sale, though, so I'll undoubtedly try the recipe if I can find it online.
  13. Edmonton had some buses running on biodiesel made from recycled fryer oil. Made them smell like french fries, which was pretty amusing.
  14. Strain out the solids and refrigerate. Only your own nose/tastebuds can tell you how many uses you'll personally get, but when you decide you're done with it you can recycle it in some jurisdictions. Otherwise bin it, but don't put it down the drain.
  15. Celery with Cheez Whiz was my childhood indulgence. As an adult I scratch that itch with Boursin or something of that sort on the celery (or a sharp blue, or...well, you get the picture). Oddly, though raisins and peanut butter are two things I like very much, "ants on a log" never did it for me. Perhaps it's one of those things you need to encounter during childhood? (I didn't)
  16. Not to flog the proverbial dead horse, but... https://www.forbes.com/sites/errolschweizer/2022/01/04/why-food-price-inflation-is-not-inevitable/?sh=735cb28649fa
  17. If you have a No Frills anywhere in your orbit, they sell ducks for $3/lb (recently raised from $2/lb). That's cheaper than chicken (at least in my neck of the woods) so I generally have one in my freezer for when the mood strikes.
  18. I'm with you. Sink 15-20 minutes (never mind 35 or 40) into watching/listening to something I could read in a matter of seconds? Screw that, life's too short.
  19. Impossible is soy, Beyond is pea protein IIRC. We keep it on hand because my GF (and her mom) can no longer eat red meat for medical reasons, and in casseroles etc it's close enough. I doubt we'd buy this faux-chicken product, though, because she can eat real poultry.
  20. Yup. I got tired of burning through the shaker canisters and bought the larger bag to refill my old one with...only to discover that the shaker had been discarded in my absence. Not that it really matters.
  21. That's not entirely correct. Wondra and its equivalents are pre-gelatinized (ie, the starchy flavor is cooked out) and then dried and re-milled. When stirred into a hot liquid it gels almost instantly, like cornstarch. Finely-ground AP flour is still AP flour, and will need to be cooked out.
  22. 1) I'm seldom in Walmart, compared to the other stores I've mentioned. 2) When I am, the shelf always seems to be empty but for the price tag. It's not worth wasting my time on another stop. Everyone else's mileage will vary, of course.
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