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Korean Food


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49 replies to this topic

#31 Jason Perlow

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Posted 04 April 2003 - 06:29 PM

Fat Guy and I had some really good yuke last night.

Definitely gonna be on my list of favorite Korean dishes now.
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#32 torakris

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Posted 04 April 2003 - 07:27 PM

Fat Guy and I had some really good yuke last night.

Definitely gonna be on my list of favorite Korean dishes now.

yuke!
yuke!
yuke!
:biggrin:

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#33 Suzanne F

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Posted 05 April 2003 - 01:34 PM

Fat Guy and I had some really good yuke last night.

Definitely gonna be on my list of favorite Korean dishes now.

Where, please? Restaurant??

#34 Jason Perlow

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Posted 05 April 2003 - 03:03 PM

Kang Suh restaurant, 1250 Broadway, NYC. Excellent coal-fired barbeque as well and the place is open 24 hours.
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#35 pariah_kerry

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Posted 06 April 2003 - 06:59 AM

Kang Suh restaurant, 1250 Broadway, NYC. Excellent coal-fired barbeque as well and the place is open 24 hours.

24 Hours...a concept unknown here, I'm jealous.
I had Korean on Friday night and talked with the chef
about yuke. She is going to prepare it for us next time we go.
She said in her experience it is a dish that the older generations
prefer. She said the younger people don't like the idea of raw beef.
Regardless, I'm psyched. I crave Korean all the time now.

#36 Jinmyo

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Posted 06 April 2003 - 07:49 AM

She said in her experience it is a dish that the older generations
prefer.  She said the younger people don't like the idea of raw beef.

That's interesting. I wonder why that would be?
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#37 Suzanne F

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Posted 06 April 2003 - 08:17 AM

She said in her experience it is a dish that the older generations
prefer.  She said the younger people don't like the idea of raw beef.

That's interesting. I wonder why that would be?

Brainwashing?

#38 pariah_kerry

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Posted 06 April 2003 - 11:45 AM

I imagine it may just be an aversion to the thought of raw meat and the mad-cow/ e-coli scares of the last few years. Most of my American friends wouldn't dream of touching steak tartare and I still find many people (namely everyone in my family, but me) scared of eating sushi. So who knows.

#39 Jinmyo

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Posted 06 April 2003 - 02:44 PM

That's sad.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#40 torakris

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Posted 06 April 2003 - 02:45 PM

That's sad.

agree, very sad! :sad:

All the young people I know over here love it!

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#41 pariah_kerry

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Posted 06 April 2003 - 09:53 PM

I look at it this way: more for me! :biggrin:

#42 DavidJS

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Posted 10 April 2003 - 11:50 PM

I represent the younger generation and personally I usually look away when I see someone order 'yuke'. My mind races of slaughterhouse with their santitation not exactly being clean. But I agree with Pariah when it comes to sushi/ sashimi it's more for me if my date isn't fond of raw fish. :rolleyes:

#43 torakris

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Posted 11 April 2003 - 02:46 AM

I represent the younger generation and personally I usually look away when I see someone order 'yuke'.  My mind races of slaughterhouse with their santitation not exactly being clean.  But I agree with Pariah when it comes to sushi/ sashimi it's more for me if my date isn't fond of raw fish.  :rolleyes:

But it tastes so good! :biggrin:

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#44 tissue

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Posted 11 April 2003 - 09:07 AM

I represent the younger generation and personally I usually look away when I see someone order 'yuke'.  My mind races of slaughterhouse with their santitation not exactly being clean.  But I agree with Pariah when it comes to sushi/ sashimi it's more for me if my date isn't fond of raw fish. :rolleyes:

But it tastes so good! :biggrin:

I have not wanted a repeat date after they have looked at me in disgust for eating raw fish, raw meat. Thanks, but I'll stick to a fellow barbarian.

:raz:

#45 confusion

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 02:39 PM

Had some Yook (Yuk) Gae Jang today and it seems like it would be great for a cold winter day. Theres nothing better than firm rice in a tasty soup. Does anyone have any recipes for a good Korean soup? Most that I've had were dark red and spicy, but from what I understand there are also clear ones. I have absolutely zero experience with Korean cooking.

#46 Jinmyo

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 03:24 PM

confusion, welcome. Do you know how to make miso-shiru? Or just a dashi?
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#47 torakris

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Posted 23 April 2003 - 03:52 PM

Had some Yook (Yuk) Gae Jang today and it seems like it would be great for a cold winter day.  Theres nothing better than firm rice in a tasty soup.  Does anyone have any recipes for a good Korean soup?  Most that I've had were dark red and spicy, but from what I understand there are also clear ones.  I have absolutely zero experience with Korean cooking.

Yuk gae jang is one of the most comforting foods I can think of! :biggrin:

Jin is right, start off with some simple miso soups.
The Koreans make some great clear soups
komtang (oxtail soup)
tongtae kuk (clear fish soup)
miyeok kuk (chicken and wakame soup)
kiyeok nengkuk (cold cucumber and wakame soup)

this last one is one of my favorites and I make all summer long. I will try to get my recipe posted.

By the way, WELCOME!! :biggrin:

Edited by torakris, 23 April 2003 - 03:52 PM.

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#48 confusion

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Posted 24 April 2003 - 08:03 AM

Thanks for the replies. My experience is limited to Chinese soups, and I have made Japanese-style miso soup (which I love). Though I've never put any dashi into the miso soup, usually will just throw in some of that Ajinomoto Hondashi. I'm not sure if thats the same thing, but dried bonito shavings aren't cheap for college students :smile: Then again I try not to skimp when it comes to food.

Those soups all sound great! I would love to try to make them. Luckily I have a korean supermarket very close by, but I don't have the slighest idea where to start. Perhaps I need to by a good intro book. I checked amazon and 'Growing up in a Korean Kitchen" and "Korean Home Cooking" look pretty good. But then again, having an actual teacher would be even better.

#49 torakris

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Posted 24 April 2003 - 03:39 PM

Thanks for the replies.  My experience is limited to Chinese soups, and I have made Japanese-style miso soup (which I love).  Though I've never put any dashi into the miso soup, usually will just throw in some of that Ajinomoto Hondashi.  I'm not sure if thats the same thing, but dried bonito shavings aren't cheap for college students  :smile:  Then again I try not to skimp when it comes to food.

Those soups all sound great!  I would love to try to make them.  Luckily I have a korean supermarket very close by, but I don't have the slighest idea where to start.  Perhaps I need to by a good intro book.  I checked amazon and 'Growing up in a Korean Kitchen" and "Korean Home Cooking" look pretty good.  But then again, having an actual teacher would be even better.

Unfortunately all of the Korean cookbooks I have are in Japanese, so i can't help with that but using instant dashi in things like miso soup is fine. Heck, I would estimate that 90% of the people in Japan do it! :biggrin:

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#50 DavidJS

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Posted 25 April 2003 - 08:40 PM

tongtae kuk (clear fish soup)
miyeok kuk (chicken and wakame soup)
kiyeok nengkuk (cold cucumber and wakame soup)


I never tried these soups before I'm missing out!