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Jean Philippe Maury Patisserie


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125 replies to this topic

#31 duckduck

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 01:22 PM

OMG! It's all so beautiful! The shop and the desserts! So now we finally know where we can get our hands on some of your work! :biggrin: Looking forward to my next trip to Vegas now. May be a while, but I'll get there. Got to get me some of that good stuff!
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#32 rjwong

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 10:29 PM

nightscotsman,

You may need to preface this thread with a warning label:

Culinary Advisory: Explicit Content
The following photos can cause gastronomic epilepsy.
You have been warned.

Congratulations, Neil!!

This is truly a world-class patisserie. Of course, I'll have to taste the pastries to confirm that statement, ehh??

Perhaps, it was a blessing in disguise that it didn't open while I was in Vegas during Christmas. I wouldn't know how to handle all this.

Keep up the good work.
I hope you find some people so you can get some rest. Four o'clock in the morning? Yikes!! :blink:
Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

#33 melmck

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 10:36 PM

super cool. thanks for posting the pix. all I can say is, must be one hell of a mise en place!!! I hope it all sells out everyday and you don't have to deal too much with leftover/day old. The Rose Macaron would be my first pick to taste.
I also wish I had millions of $$$ in financial backing!! The only fountains I have are from leaky, rotting plumbing . which will cost $1900 to fix.
You are lucky to be in your situation. It is rare!!! Have fun with it !
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#34 chiantiglace

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 11:43 PM

All i've got to say is 2700miles.

I do beleive im tempted to quit my job and run across country. Whats a beach resort traded for a casino, nothin but more lights.

I will be coming out with some colleagues this summer for the 2005 ACF convention this year, i'd love to take a look at that display box and how it works. Any chance of a behind the scenes look?

Edited by chiantiglace, 18 January 2005 - 11:50 PM.

Dean Anthony Anderson
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Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#35 simdelish

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 11:50 AM

Oh... my.... God.....!

Everything looks exquisite! How exciting to be a part of such a beautiful place!

My first thought: "Hmmmmmm..... let's see ..... $5.50 times 5, 6, no, 11, geez ...16....uh....uh.... uh! 25! I'll need to rob the casino before I can come buy one of each to try!!!!"


I DID immediately notice the case, Neil. I thought it looks as if the pastries literally just sit right on the granite or whatever, with that stainless shield around them. Hard to tell from the pic: is there glass between the pastries and the customers? It doesn't look like it! (Or is the glass just super-clean ? :wink: )
I can't imagine any greater temptation ... people could just point and 'OOOPS! Was that my finger???' :blink:

Thank you for the beautiful photos!

Oh, btw, I really LOVE how the little label/signs for each of the pastries says not just the name of the item, but exactly what is in those lovely jewels. Counter clerks hate having to explain that 1000 times/day more than anything. It makes such sense! (except for "lime emulsion".... I think that sounds weird and unappetizing. I certainly know what is meant, but I can't imagine the average customer does... maybe you all should consider a better term :shock: )
I like to cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.

#36 mkfradin

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 02:42 PM

I hope it all sells out everyday and you don't have to deal too much with leftover/day old.



Funny-as I was looking at these gorgeous pictures and thinking about all the work that goes into getting everything done and looking the way it does, the same thought went through my mind. Do you put stuff out fresh every day, or can it last for a day or two? It bugs me to toss a plain blueberry muffin, and tossing all of these pastries going into the garbage or a food bank after less than 24 hours would give me a heart attack.

But most of all, I say WOW. Best of luck.

Marjorie

#37 tan319

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 04:26 PM

First off, congrats, Neil!!!
Everything looks fantastic, but I would expect nothing less from your crew :biggrin:
And lest anyone forget, it's a crew, a pretty big one, running 24/7.
I was surprised to read on one of Neils posts that they're only making 12 to 24 of each item a day.
On the freshness issue, I'd say it's 50/50 they carry thru a day, maybe?
Fruit tarts would probably be dumped?
Great stuff!
2317/5000

#38 peppyre

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 05:10 PM

Well, looks like I'm going to Vegas this year. Wow! The store just looks absolutely incredible. Congrats! It's always nice to a part of something so spectacular. Can't wait to try some of this stuff.

#39 nightscotsman

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 02:09 AM

The dessert display does have glass in front and a short glass shelf on top, but otherwise the pastries are uncovered and sit directly on the chilled granite counter (except for small cardboard rounds, of course).

Everything is made fresh every day - nothing is kept for a second day. Leftovers, which have been rare so far, go to the employee dining room). Although you have to realize that many items are made up partially in bulk and kept frozen, then we just pull what we need each morning and do the finishing. But stuff like the napoleans, fruit tarts and eclairs are certainly made from scratch daily.

#40 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 06:04 AM

I have some questions about the garnishes and finishes, if you don't mind.

1. On the Exotic, Imperial and Pecan Tart what do the ball shapes on top consist of? How do you get it so darn round?

2. On the Chocobana is the green triangle garnish sugar? in the refridgerator?

3. Whats the garnish on top of the eclair (more balls)?

4. Can you explain how you finish the carrot cake, from it's orange coating to the garnishes on top, please?

THANKS

#41 RMR

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 08:27 AM

Simply stunning, Neil. Thanks for posting the pictures and the descriptions.

I’ll have one Imperial to go, please.

#42 chezcherie

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 08:37 AM

is the fountain on yet???
"Laughter is brightest where food is best."
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#43 Marcia

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 09:39 AM

Wow, congratulation to all the team!
The cheesecake looks so delicate, the folds in the chocolate are really beautiful.
Can't wait to see the choc fountain too.

#44 nightscotsman

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 03:02 PM

I have some questions about the garnishes and finishes, if you don't mind.

1. On the Exotic, Imperial and Pecan Tart what do the ball shapes on top consist of? How do you get it so darn round?

They are various flavors of cremeux (passion fruit, vanilla, and chocolate), which is sort of a stove-top creme brulee with a bit of gelatine to set. They get the perfectly round ball shape by using custom silicon molds. The light chocolate flower-like shape on top of the Imperial is also produced with a custom mold. By the way, the Exotic and the Imperial were both developed for last year's World Pastry Competition and helped the US team win the gold medal. So if you've ever wanted to taste what the judges are tasting, this is your chance. :biggrin:

2. On the Chocobana is the green triangle garnish sugar? in the refridgerator?

The green shapes are white chocolate and are sort of stylized bamboo leaves.

3. Whats the garnish on top of the eclair (more balls)?

Caramelized hazelnuts.

4. Can you explain how you finish the carrot cake, from it's orange coating to the garnishes on top, please?

The carrot cake is assembled in a ring mold, frozen, unmolded, and sprayed with orange cocoa butter. The sides are decorated with white chocolate squares, and the top has a white chocolate fan, marzipan carrot, three dots of clear glaze each with a touch of gold leaf, and a little round plastic JP logo.

#45 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 03:28 PM

Thanks Neil!

No way, the logos are plastic, not chocolate? That would be a serious choking hazard.........

Darn, custom molds, it figures! Are they two pieces......how can you unmold them if they aren't?

I thought those might be hazelnuts on the eclairs cause their the right size..........just didn't think they'd put hazelnuts on a eclair, thanks.


O.k. I think you can buy the green leaves thru PCB (even molded already)........at least they have something extremely similar.

Now the real stumper............I don't get how you get that smooth of a surface spraying cocoa butter straight on a carrot cake? Help, I'm stumped.

#46 nightscotsman

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 04:12 PM

Thanks Neil!

No way, the logos are plastic, not chocolate? That would be a serious choking hazard.........

Darn, custom molds, it figures! Are they two pieces......how can you unmold them if they aren't?

I thought those might be hazelnuts on the eclairs cause their the right size..........just didn't think they'd put hazelnuts on a eclair, thanks.

O.k. I think you can buy the green leaves thru PCB (even molded already)........at least they have something extremely similar.

Now the real stumper............I don't get how you get that smooth of a surface spraying cocoa butter straight on a carrot cake? Help, I'm stumped.

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They tried to do the logos in chocolate, but could never get satifying (ie: perfect) results.

The custom molds are just one piece. The balls are frozen very hard before unmolding.

The hazelnuts are on top to indicate the hazelnut cremeux filling inside the vanilla cream.

The leaves (like all of our chocolate deco) are done in house by our chocolate team, but PCB might have something like that.

The smooth surface comes from using the ring mold rather than frosting each cake by hand. They come out of the mold smooth and clean just like a mousse cake. We spray them frozen to get a velvet finish.

#47 RETREVR

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 08:34 PM

My mother will be visiting a freind in Vegas in the coming days. I mentioned this to her and she flipped. You might need to call security.

#48 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 21 January 2005 - 05:54 AM

Wow..........I hope no one gets hurt eating those plastic logos. I see a law suit in their future. Have they really considered that?

Thanks a bunch Neil. I still stuck on the carrot cakes though. I can't comprehend how the exterior surface bakes smooth. Hum...........

#49 nightscotsman

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Posted 21 January 2005 - 03:20 PM

Thanks a bunch Neil. I still stuck on the carrot cakes though. I can't comprehend how the exterior surface bakes smooth. Hum...........

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Oh, I think I see where the confusion is. The cakes aren't baked in the rings. We bake sheets of carrot cake and cut rounds with a circle cutter. Then the individual cakes are assembled in rings with the cream cheese filling just like a mousse cake, so when they are unmolded, the outside is covered with frosting with a smooth finish.

#50 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 21 January 2005 - 03:43 PM

Whew.... gotcha now. Sorry, I can be pretty slow.

Thank-you.

#51 chiantiglace

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 11:01 PM

Hahahaaa, that litened up my night.





Posted Image



Neil, do you use these kind of molds, because I really like these kind and haven't found better ones.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#52 nightscotsman

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 01:57 AM

I've seen some of those molds around the kitchen, but I've never seen them used. I don't think the chefs like them. For almost everything we use either Flexipan or metal ring molds. However, we have been using these new (custom made, I assume) molds that are more like forms for the JPM desserts. They are sort of like two sheetpan sized sheets of plexiglass with 2 or 2-1/2 inch round holes cut out, separated by removeable plastic pillars that keep them about two inches apart. The circlular holes line up so they can hold acetate strips rolled into tubes that actually form the molds. To unmold, you just pull off the top sheet of plexi and remove the individual cakes.

#53 chiantiglace

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 02:02 AM

Do you have any idea of how hard it is to ge DeMarle to do custom flexi-pan. I know they do it but im not sure to what degree. i.e. for small business, personal use, one time only.... or just large production-hotel.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#54 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 08:38 AM

Actually, I'm delighted to read that they don't use those molds much at your work Neil. I started a thread before on them.........they just take SO D___ long to use, I hardly ever use mine. They also break!!

I've seen what your talking about to hold the acetate strips.......I think in P A & D. I've been looking for something similar that I could use everytime I go into a home improvement store. Eventually I might ask our handiman to make some for me, it seems easy-ish! Besides I want to be able to serve items on my buffet in those too.

#55 kthull

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 09:06 AM

Friberg also gives specs for making that type of mold using plywood and dowels in the Advanced Pastry Chef book (pretty sure it's the first one). Neat concept.

#56 nightscotsman

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 01:51 PM

Do you have any idea of how hard it is to ge DeMarle to do custom flexi-pan.  I know they do it but im not sure to what degree.  i.e. for small business, personal use, one time only.... or just large production-hotel.

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I'm sure you're right, but the ones we use aren't from DeMarle. They're cast silicone made for us by Chef Rubber (which happens to be based here in Vegas). The molds never go in the oven.

#57 lepatissier

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Posted 23 January 2005 - 11:58 PM

As a matter of fact, at the Bellagio we do have a whole bunch of those kinds of molds . . . we have a bunch in storage . . . but Ive never seen us use them . . . :)

#58 chiantiglace

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 01:28 AM

Wow what a waste of money to never use something. Thats corporate for ya I guess.

Sinclair, acetate is almost a whole nother skill. I say you should do and try everything that pops into your head for acetate. Get as many ideas from people here as possible. I have come up with some really cool tricks with acetate. It's super smooth surface is unbeatable for and desserts presentation. Chocolate casting for garnish using acetate has endless possibilties. Sometimes i play with strips just to get a new idea for a dessert, you never know whats going to pop into your head.

Also I would be very careful with whatever you "construct" from the hardware store. If i mod something together i usuallly coat it with something like polyurethan or silicone to give it a sealed finish so food doesn't have any reactions with certain kinds of metals or metal treatments. Also wood dowels should be sealed too like your rolling pins because after fair amount of usage they collect debris and even if you try to wash it out the wood soaks up water obviously which could cause more problems.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#59 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 05:42 AM

Sinclair, acetate is almost a whole nother skill.  I say you should do and try everything that pops into your head for acetate.  Get as many ideas from people here as possible.  I have come up with some really cool tricks with acetate.  It's super smooth surface is unbeatable for and desserts presentation.  Chocolate casting for garnish using acetate has endless possibilties.  Sometimes i play with strips just to get a new idea for a dessert, you never know whats going to pop into your head.


Any chance you could post an example, I'm not totally sure I follow you.

#60 bripastryguy

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Posted 24 January 2005 - 10:14 AM

Neil,

so awesome I cant explain. Can you find out where those new fangled molds (the plexi ones ) come from?
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