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Pickled Chinese Cabbage

Chinese Condiments

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2 replies to this topic

#1 kitchensqueen

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Posted 16 May 2009 - 12:39 PM

I'm making bamee noodles with barbecued pork tonight for dinner, and it called for pickled Chinese cabbage. I found pickled everything - except cabbage - at the market this afternoon. I bought kimchee - would this be a good substitute? Or even what the recipe was calling for?

I also have fresh Chinese cabbage - if the kimchee isn't ideal, can I make my own pickled cabbage in a few hours? If so, how would I go about doing it?

#2 loki

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 04:48 PM

I'm pretty sure this is Preserved Tianjin Vegetables - a Chinese preserved vegetable, also used in Thai cooking. It is used in soup, so this it a likely candidate. This answer comes very late, so is not likely to help with your dish anymore, but you can't easily make it quickly.

Even though it says it's cabbage and chinese, I have a hard time believing it's actually Chinese cabbage (I'm a botanist, Master gardeners, and food-lore enthusiast). I suspect something is lost in the translation. It's called winter cabbage preserve too - and I think it's actually regular western cabbage - and it's Thai name anyway Cai Bap is Western Cabbage (which is Brassica oleracea (capitata group) - probably originated in the Mediteranean region where wild relative are still found, while chinese cabbages are Brassica rapa (various groups) the same species as turnips, but the origins of the plants are obscure - but likely western Asia)

http://www.templeoft...-5350000280.php

#3 djyee100

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 05:21 PM

I agree, if I saw that ingredient in a recipe, I would use preserved Tianjin vegetable. It's sold cheaply in Asian markets, in a distinctive clay crock.

http://en.wikipedia....erved_vegetable

I don't think kimchee is a good substitute, because of its spice. In a pinch, I would substitute old-fashioned sauerkraut, drained and dried well on a paper towel. Tianjin vegetable is more pungent and earthy than sauerkraut.





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