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Panna Cotta: Recipes & Techniques

Dessert Italian

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115 replies to this topic

#91 alanamoana

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 01:10 PM

if you use metal tubes, you can avoid the acetate as well and just warm the outside briefly with a torch to unmold. don't even need spray. i think the only reason i considered acetate is that the panna cotta is flexible (don't want to use too much gelatin :blink: ) and this would aid in getting it to the right place on the plate without having to handle it too much or without it falling apart.

#92 sanantone

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 07:59 PM

I've done this with pvc pipe and a plastic wrap to seal the open end.  You can dispence with the acetate by very lightly coating the interior of the tube with food release spray.

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Slightly off topic but elated to this posting... I make my own ring molds for plating out of PVC pipe. This is because its ton cheaper than 'professional' molds and PVC is what most new houses use for water plumbing so it has got to be safe. Am I correct in my assumption or have I been poisoning my dinner guests?

#93 andiesenji

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 08:57 PM

They probably used one of these tube molds.
I've used them for molding rice and ice cream. I bought them at a local craft store that supplies hobby soap makers.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#94 tangaloor

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 07:11 AM

Slightly off topic but elated to this posting... I make my own ring molds for plating out of PVC pipe.  This is because its  ton cheaper than 'professional' molds and PVC is what most new houses use for water plumbing so it has got to be safe.  Am I correct in my assumption or have I been poisoning my dinner guests?

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PVC pipe is generally used for waste discharge, not for water supply. Most contemporary supply lines are copper or polyethylene.

#95 alanamoana

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 07:57 AM

i think pvc is fine as long as you don't heat it.

#96 twodogs

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 08:11 AM

we actually use pvc which we cut into three inch lengths and then use the plastic wrap and a rubber band to seal the bottom.

in fact at the store, you can cut a 12 foot pipe into the lengths you want, utilizing the in store saw.

actually we have spent a good amount of time at home depot recently sourcing building supplies for their culinary uses.
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#97 adey73

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 08:49 AM

thanks as always for sharing.
I receive your website updates daily, and they really are the most welcome item in my inbox.
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#98 andiesenji

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 01:39 PM

Not all PVC pipe is food grade, although it is supposed to be produced from "food grade" materials.

Some PVC pipe, imported from China contains materials one does not want around food.
One producer manufactures PVC pipe, intended for plumbing use, mostly underground sprinkler systems or in recreational vehicles, trailers, in the same plant that it also manufactures PVC/cement/asbestos pipe for the south China sea farming industry.

Be sure to buy only PVC pipe made in the USA or Canada and is identified by a dye strip in the pipe or a cast-in mfg. number.

Before I retired, I worked in a medical office that we shared with an internist/toxicologist who received monthly bulletins about hazardous materials in the workplace. One of the bulletins specifically noted that workers cutting imported PVC pipe with power tools should always wear eye and breathing protection and cover any exposed areas of skin, remove clothing esposed to the dust from cutting and launder it separately from household linens and other clothing.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#99 genarog

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 08:59 AM

What's the best cream I get can my hands on in the NYC metro area, including Long Island?

I've made three attempts of Panna Cotta, using 3 diffrent recipes, and didn't like the results, at least when compared to what I had in Rome and Bologna.

In all three attempts I used cream bought at Whole Foods, the one that comes in a small bottle. I also used varied amounts of gelatin, as per each recipe.

#100 KKLL00b

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 12:49 PM

I once ate "the best" panna cotta ever at a friend's restaurant before it closed. It was infused with lemongrass and a bit of ginger. I googled several panna cotta recipes on the net and finally settled on the one I found at Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Splendid Table website. It calls for heavy whipping cream, sour cream, and gelatin.

Try the recipe asis before reducing the gelatin. To minimize the "cooked" taste in the cream, after blooming the gelatin in water, microwave the gelatin/water mix at low power for about 10 seconds and stir until it's fully dissolved. You may need a few more zaps before the gelatin completely dissolves.

Once you dissolve the gelatin in the water you can stir it into the barely warmed cream mixture. Just be sure to stir gently so as not to form air bubbles.

I've made several variations of this recipe, including the lemongrass/ginger, green tea, Earl grey tea, passion fruit, guava, Chinese five spice, and a few others. I actually like my lemongrass/ginger version more than my friend's restaurant recipe.

#101 DO'S

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 03:12 PM

Hi All,

I've recently being trying to perfect my Panna Cotta recipe.

The main problem I have is that my mixture develops a thick skin on the top after setting in the mould (which becomes the bottom when turned out onto a plate.)

I use 50/50 milk and cream... powerdered gelatin and vanilla pods. The mixture never comes to a boil in the pot and I let it cool for 30 mins or so before placing in the gelatin (absorbed in water prior).

I'm very happy with the overall texture and consistency of the set mixutre... there's no separation and it tastes good, it's just the pesky skin that forms on top.

Has anyone else experienced this? Any suggestions?

Cheers.

#102 ElsieD

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 04:23 PM

This will likely get the plastic wrap police after me, but try putting some plastic wrap directly on the tops of the panna cotta and chill them with the plastic on top. That will stop the skin from forming.

#103 DO'S

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 01:18 AM

This will likely get the plastic wrap police after me, but try putting some plastic wrap directly on the tops of the panna cotta and chill them with the plastic on top. That will stop the skin from forming.



Thanks very much... I'll give it a try.

#104 Shel_B

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Posted 28 April 2010 - 06:05 AM

If you're a lemon lover , you might want to try this easy
recipe - it's really good. I followed the recipe exactly, except for
the elimination of the extra 2 tablespoons of sugar.

http://www.sfgate.co....html?rid=18149

.... Shel


#105 BeeZee

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 07:24 AM

did you make it same day to serve? I'm thinking that would be good for Mother's Day dinner for my Mom, but I might need to make it a day before and I know sometimes yogurt "weeps"...
"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

#106 Shel_B

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 11:19 AM

did you make it same day to serve? I'm thinking that would be good for Mother's Day dinner for my Mom, but I might need to make it a day before and I know sometimes yogurt "weeps"...


I made it in the morning, early, for enjoying in the evening. Didn't notice any weeping. I suspect it would keep for a day, or even more, as the gelatin should firm up and hold the mixture. Come to think of it, about half the batch was eaten the next day, and there was no weeping, even though the panna cotta had been cut into.

Edited by Shel_B, 03 May 2010 - 11:20 AM.

.... Shel


#107 BeeZee

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 03:24 PM

good to know, thanks :smile:
"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

#108 Shel_B

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Posted 03 May 2010 - 03:46 PM

Of course, it's easy enough to make that you can run a test batch and see how it does with your ingredients, which may be different than the ones I used. I don't know enough about making desserts and such to unequivically say your ingredients and technique will give the same results as mine, but then again, I don't know enough to say they won't.

Edited by Shel_B, 03 May 2010 - 03:47 PM.

.... Shel


#109 BeeZee

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 08:34 AM

I did in fact make this for Mother's Day and it was easy and tasty. They meyer lemons at the supermarket were terrible (packaged in plastic mesh sacks, each one had at least one rotted lemon) so I used 1 part orange juice to 3 parts lemon and it was still very lemony/tangy. Served with sweet cherry compote.
Had some leftovers and it did not "weep" for me, either.
"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

#110 iainpb

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 03:58 AM

I have amde a rose water flavoured panacaotta before which works nicely with a strawberry compote. You will need to substituer a little of the milk for teh rose water to ensure it still sets.

#111 David Ross

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Posted 17 September 2011 - 06:01 PM

I had never made Panna Cotta before yesterday, and now I'm glad I did. I've been looking for some new ideas of how to use the season's first crop of fresh Huckleberries. This year, with the supply of Huckleberries so low-and the price so high-I wasn't sure if I should risk using the berries in a new recipe or go with one of my old standby's. I came to a compromise and paired my Huckleberry Compote with a Sour Cream Panna Cotta. It was delicious.

I used a recipe from Chef Laurent Tourondol as the basis of the Panna Cotta. But instead of cream fraiche I used sour cream, and instead of gelatin sheets, I used 1 1/2 tsp. of powdered gelatin. The result was a smooth, silky, creamy Panna Cotta with just a hint of sour tang. It paired beautifully with the Huckleberry Compote, which is a simple mixture of berries, sugar, wine, vinegar, cinnamon and nutmeg. I typically use red wine and balsamic vinegar, but this time I used champagne vinegar and late harvest riesling. The champagne vinegar was lighter than the balsamic and the late harvest riesling accented the sweetness of the Huckleberries. Enjoy.

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#112 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 04:43 PM

I made panna cotta for the first time for the Easter meal yesterday. It was a crème fraîche panna cotta served with macerated strawberries, which was a good combination. It tasted great and the texture was really nice (it was just set, not rubbery at all). However, even though I had carefully oiled my molds (I was using little espresso cups), I had a hard time getting them out. I used a sharp knife to get the first one out and it did not look very pretty, so I ended up serving them in the cup with the strawberries on the side.

I've had panna cotta plenty of times in restaurants that had been unmolded and looked pristine - what is the secret? Does it need to be more firm (more gelatin) to be unmolded properly? Maybe I just need more practice!

Thanks!

#113 Kouign Aman

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:16 AM

Did you try dipping the mold in hot water for a few seconds, as with releasing jello molds?
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#114 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:23 AM

Did you try dipping the mold in hot water for a few seconds, as with releasing jello molds?


Not, I did not. I have one panna cotta left so I will try this tip tonight. Thanks Kouign Aman!

#115 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:17 PM

The hot water trick worked very well, thanks again Kouign Aman.

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#116 Kouign Aman

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 01:07 PM

I keep thinking that panna cotta is a perfectly good breakfast dish. I must find time to make some this weekend and see if the family agrees. That picture is so enticing, FrogPrincesse.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.





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