Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Minimalist No-Knead Bread Technique (Part 1)

Bread

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
594 replies to this topic

#241 djyee100

djyee100
  • society donor
  • 1,564 posts
  • Location:San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 21 November 2006 - 05:47 PM

to cookman:

I mentioned using an oiled bowl in my post of 11/19. That's what I always do. I oil the bowl lightly. I don't think it makes any difference in the crust. The crusts in my breads are thin and crackly like French baguette.

to SusanGiff:

Cast iron tends to hold in heat, which can result in overcooking and burning. I suggest you use the 450 degree temperature in the printed recipe (as opposed to the 500 temperature in the video).

As for burned bottoms: Sometimes you can move the bread to a higher oven rack to put less heat on the bottom; but then the top gets more heat and will turn browner.

Sometimes if I am troubleshooting a bread I will move the bread higher up in the oven if the bottom is getting too brown; or I will lower the bread in the oven if the top is getting too brown.

to everyone:

Does this recipe have legs. I received an email from a breadbaking friend and he's cooked this recipe twice since I last heard from him (he's up to a total of 3 tries). He's already planning what to do for bread #4.

Edited by djyee100, 21 November 2006 - 06:14 PM.


#242 Pontormo

Pontormo
  • participating member
  • 2,589 posts

Posted 21 November 2006 - 10:35 PM

It sounds like Rice Krispies!

The crackling was intense as the loaf was removed from the oven. My observations thus far:

1) Flour counter lightly? Ha!

It may be different on stainless steel, but despite comments about how liquid this was, I was not prepared, being more accustomed to adding flour to the bowl when dough is in the state mine was in after about 20 hours, not pouring it out on the counter. Fine and easy to control especially after watching the video in which JL advises you to pat it down, then fold it. Still, there was watery residue on the bottom of the Pyrex bowl and a lot of warm moisture in the air from simmering stock exacerbated the "problem".

Breeze to handle, fold over and let rest, but after 15 minutes of resting, once plastic was lifted, the dough had absorbed all the flour on top and on the bottom. Stuck to counter a bit, though that, too, easy to remedy. Therefore, I ended up incorporating quite a bit more flour by sprinkling surface twice, the second time to shape the loaf.

Verdict: I don't think it would be a bad idea to put waxed paper on the counter and flouring it before dumping out contents of the bowl.

2) Will try to eliminate the floured towel perhaps next time, though I am curious and wonder why some of us had soggy patches on the bottom of our towels, while most posts don't mention a bad clinging effect.

I suspect I overcompensated for the fear that the dough would spread out if I left it just on the counter, wrapped in a single towel. (I should have tried it anyway since the loaf really is shaped once it hits the hot pot.) So, I put the wrapped dough inside a different glass bowl. The glass, in turn, encouraged moisture to build and when I unwrapped the towel, a sizeable amount (1/3 cup?) was stuck to overly floured towel. I scraped that off and put that on top of my loaf, sort of like a Sumo wrestler's topknot. Fine. Spread into a free-form, rustic flourish. So, I will also try eliminating the bowl during attempt number three.

3) Trust your nose

Ten minutes after I took the lid off the Dutch oven, I could smell the loaf in the other room. Since the top was such a light color when I got my first peep, I decided to wait five more minutes. By then, top looked great, but bottom has a couple of black patches that are better for pizza than bread.

Verdict: See if I can raise the rack in the oven, i.e., if the Dutch oven will still fit. Also:

4) Double the recipe for my Dutch oven (6 quart?), or at least move up to 4 1/2 to 5 cups of flour and so on. Loaf looks beautiful, but many of the slices will not be very tall. Others seem to have noticed the same thing.

I'm looking forward to trying it in the morning. The crust does look amazing.

ETA: I just read the post right above this. Seems my first attempt is in keeping with the experience of others, given the advice my resolutions echo.

Edited by Pontormo, 21 November 2006 - 10:37 PM.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#243 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 22 November 2006 - 06:10 AM

I found hard rolls here:

http://not-too-shabby.net/eats/?p=90

This person just tented a muffin pan with aluminum foil. They look great.

#244 Pontormo

Pontormo
  • participating member
  • 2,589 posts

Posted 22 November 2006 - 09:47 AM

First, I am extremely pleased. The crust is the best I've ever baked, not too thick at all. The cut loaf resembles nothing I've ever baked before, but instead, some of the best loaves I've purchased. Chewy texture is a delight.

BUT: I can see where Jackal10 is coming from in regards to the crumb.

Sorry I don't have a digital camera, but after a first rising of 20 hours and second of 2 1/2, I find there are just too many extremely large holes that twist to form tunnels throughout the loaf. This is essentially ciabatta. I'd prefer a more compact slice, as beautiful as the glossy cavities are.

I also find the loaf a little damp. Not annoyingly so, but I wonder what to do about it next time, besides check for an internal temperature which I did not. If I left the uncovered loaf in for more than 15 minutes, the bottom crust would have been inedible.

One thing I might try is not heating the lid to lower the overall temperature. I'm not sure.

Has anyone with an enameled Dutch oven tried baking theirs at a temperature lower than 450 F?

One of the reasons my loaf charred a bit on the bottom was that I overfloured my towel. (The kitchen seems coated with a fine, white dusting.) Excess flour landed on the hot surface of the Dutch oven and burned.

As for toast? Just lightly golden, spread with butter, it would make a Quaker out of Pierre Hermé.
"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#245 SusanGiff

SusanGiff
  • participating member
  • 280 posts

Posted 22 November 2006 - 10:16 AM

First of all, Pontormo, thanks for the synopsis. Very helpful. And to others, thanks for suggestions of moving the pot. I think I'm going to stick with 450 or 475 from now on.

And get this! This morning I took a closer look at the teeny tiny measuring spoon I'd been using for the yeast. It turns out I've made something like 6 delicious breads with just an eighth of a teaspoon of yeast, not the 1/4 teaspoon the recipe calls for. Number 7 is rising now with the full amount. Will it make any difference?

Also, I'm definitely going with the oiled bowl from now on--it worked great for me, unlike the floured towel, which was an enormous mess and actually ruined a few pair of socks when I threw it in the machine. Domestic life: such a trial.

Susan

#246 cajungirl

cajungirl
  • participating member
  • 111 posts
  • Location:SF Bay Area

Posted 22 November 2006 - 10:42 AM

2) Will try to eliminate the floured towel perhaps next time, though I am curious and wonder why some of us had soggy patches on the bottom of our towels, while most posts don't mention a bad clinging effect.

View Post


I have found that rice flour (not glutinous) on the towel works really well. Though some of the moisture still leaches onto the cloth, there is no sticking. I don't use it on the counter though, I just use wheat flour and a bench knife for my folding.
Just a simple southern lady lost out west...

"Leave Mother in the fridge in a covered jar between bakes. No need to feed her." Jackal10

#247 Dianne

Dianne
  • participating member
  • 197 posts
  • Location:Toronto, On.

Posted 22 November 2006 - 12:52 PM

I keep plopping my formed and risen loaf in to the pot still on the parchment I let it rise on. I don't try to turn the loaf over into the pot. I slash the top of the loaf instead. The paper gets brown but does not burn and the bottom crust is a lovely golden colour. And there is no flour mess.

#248 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 22 November 2006 - 03:20 PM

Pontormo, try going back to 18 hours and 2 hours - your bread may just have been proofing too long. The loaf I did in enameled cast iron was 30 minutes with the (pre-heated) top on at 450, then 15 minutes with the top off. That took it to 210, and it was done.

Ok, everybody, put a digital instant read thermometer on your holiday wish list right now! And right after that, a good kitchen scale. If you don't cook and bake with weight instead of volume yet, you are going to be so thrilled with the difference!

#249 devlin

devlin
  • participating member
  • 648 posts
  • Location:Indiana/Kentucky border, Kentucky Derby country

Posted 22 November 2006 - 03:37 PM

And get this! This morning I took a closer look at the teeny tiny measuring spoon I'd been using for the yeast. It turns out I've made something like 6 delicious breads with just an eighth of a teaspoon of yeast, not the 1/4 teaspoon the recipe calls for. Number 7 is rising now with the full amount. Will it make any difference?



Susan

View Post


It may rise a little faster, and if you're really sensitive to the taste of commercial yeast, you may notice a slight change in flavor. If you're satisfied with the smaller amount, though, I'd stick with that. As far as I'm concerned, the less yeast the better. Since I've switched to sourdoughs, commercial yeast lends an unpleasant flavor to breads that lingers and overpowers the dough.

#250 Lapin d'Argent

Lapin d'Argent
  • participating member
  • 259 posts
  • Location:Harvard, MA

Posted 22 November 2006 - 04:50 PM

Has anyone with an enameled Dutch oven tried baking theirs at a temperature lower than 450 F?

View Post

Sorry, I can't answer this question, but I can answer a related question nobody has asked yet :smile: : Can you make this bread if you don't have an enameled cast iron or cast iron or corning ware or heavy pottery vessel?

Answer: Yes, if you have a 10 qt All-Clad Stainless Dutch Oven.

Made it twice, both times with excellent results. First time with all bread flour, germ restored (from a local natural food store); second time with 1 cup of KA white WW sub'd in. Second time I also increased the salt, as suggested by others here. Proofed for 18 hours and then 2 hours. No serious problems with sticking, although I used plenty of extra flour. I used a 450 oven, cooked for 30 minutes with the lid on and finished for 15 with the lid off.

Sorry no photos; the crumb was very nice with good holes that weren't too big. I got good oven spring, especially considering how over-sized the pot was for the loaf. The closest thing I can compare it to is a local brand we have here in the greater Boston area called Iggy's; the flavor wasn't nearly as good, but the crumb and the crust were all that!!

I had no idea it was possible for mere mortals, with a minimum of effort, to achieve something so sublime.

I suspect that the key to real flavor, as well as great crumb and crust, is a natural starter, as others have indicated. That's my next project.

But overall, I love the simplicity and convenience for such great results. Thanks, everyone, for all sharing your experiences and suggestions.

- L.

#251 Pontormo

Pontormo
  • participating member
  • 2,589 posts

Posted 22 November 2006 - 05:01 PM

Pontormo, try going back to 18 hours and 2 hours - your bread may just have been proofing too long.  The loaf I did in enameled cast iron was 30 minutes with the (pre-heated) top on at 450, then 15 minutes with the top off.  That took it to 210, and it was done.

Ok, everybody, put a digital instant read thermometer on your holiday wish list right now!  And right after that, a good kitchen scale.  If you don't cook and bake with weight instead of volume yet, you are going to be so thrilled with the difference!

View Post

Thanks, Abra!

Time just got away from me and I recall that the video (watched over and over, boy am I SICK of that American Express commercial!!!) involved a dough that went for 19 hours, but I suspect you're right. I also have a tempermental oven which seems to be a little on the hot side these days.

I have a digital thermometer, I just didn't use it even though it was out on the counter to make sure the kitchen remained warm enough. Next time, promise.

Questions for you or anyone else since I will definitely try this method again over the weekend:

1) Have you posted anything here converting recipe into weight vs. volume? I haven't had a chance to reread the entire thread.

2) Has anyone tried to bake a larger loaf in one Dutch oven? I'm planning to move up to 4-5 cups and want to see if someone has advice or results to report.
"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#252 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 22 November 2006 - 11:12 PM

Here's what I use for a larger batch:

20 oz King Arthur AP flour
4 oz semolina flour
3/8 tsp SAF Gold
3 1/2 tsp DC kosher salt
2 1/2 cups water

I have it proofing now. Last time I made this much I did two smaller loaves, but this is going to be a big one with roasted garlic folded in.

#253 rlibkind

rlibkind
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,971 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 23 November 2006 - 12:08 AM

The flour weight usually works out to about 16 - 17 ounces, depending on the particular flour you use. 1-5/8 c water will always weigh out to 13 ounces.
Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

Robert's Market Report

#254 pizzabrasil

pizzabrasil
  • participating member
  • 12 posts

Posted 23 November 2006 - 03:41 AM

This thread is like an addiction!
I did not try this recipe since I have not a Dutch oven. However I will try it in a stainless steel pan that is in my kitchen.
I had not access to the video and I am wondering if there is anybody in this site that had recorded it and could mail it to me (PM, may be).
I would like to give a try in the home oven and later in wood oven (directly over the hearth). I am curious to see if and how it works at higher temperatures and out of pan.

Thank you all
Luis

#255 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,451 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 23 November 2006 - 10:35 AM

I have started a batch in one of my bread machines to mix and proof it -no heat- I have it in the pantry against the outside wall where it stays very cool, highest temp yesterday was 58 F. but right now it is 48, almost as cold as my cheese/produce fridge. I opened the door and it was almost like a walk-in.
Tomorrow I wil try baking it off in a round-bottomed cast iron pot in the barbecue, in the grill/firebox section because the barbecue is going to be used to roast a javelina for my neighbors.
We finally have temps suitable for November and tonight the low is supposed to be 28 F. I wil have to cover the little citrus trees and a cherry tomato plant that is still going strong as they have yet to be moved into the greenhouse.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#256 SparrowsFall

SparrowsFall
  • participating member
  • 176 posts

Posted 23 November 2006 - 07:54 PM

I noticed that a couple of people were trying more yeast/less time, so I thought I'd give that a try. (Cause I'm catching a plane at the crack of dawn tomorrow.)

Did 1 tsp yeast, then (being a man of extremes) put it in a quite warm oven (150).

Two hours, knocked it down, another hour and a half, then into the hot pan. 30 minutes top on, 20 minutes top off, 210 degrees internal with my recently (by me) calibrated instaread. (Yes, Abra my dear, I'm on my way now to add dig therm and scale to my Amazon wish list.)

Short story, it worked okay:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Long story, I don't think it's as good. Denser (like, don't drop it on your toe), little oven spring, more elastic/rubbery. *Very* big holes interspersed with much finer/denser grain.

Did seem to have a bit more flavor than the long method--*definitely* smelled the yeast when I was putting it in the hot pan.

So I'll go back to the long rise, but this is close enough that I'll experiment more in the future. A third rise might do it.

Steve

Edited by SparrowsFall, 23 November 2006 - 08:02 PM.

"Approach love and cooking with reckless abandon." --Dalai Lama

#257 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 24 November 2006 - 03:20 PM

Yesterday I made this dough as I described above, with 20% semolina, but I made it into roasted garlic bread.

Of necessity, it only got a 14 hour rise instead of 18, and the dough was very slack. Too slack, in fact. but I smothered it in roasted garlic

Posted Image

and folded it all up to rise. I did end up with more of a ciabatta-thickness loaf this time, but it was really good to eat.

Posted Image

The garlic wasn't as evenly distributed as I would have liked. Perhaps there's some trick to that?

Posted Image

It made a lovely Thanksgiving appetizer go-with.

Edited by Abra, 24 November 2006 - 03:21 PM.


#258 Miriam Kresh

Miriam Kresh
  • participating member
  • 191 posts
  • Location:Central Israel

Posted 25 November 2006 - 01:44 PM

I baked a sourdough version on an open, hot clay saucer. This is my preferred baking surface, and I used it as I don't have a heavy lidded pot that would go in the oven. It rose well. Baking temperature was 230 C. I found that I had to add much more flour to make a dough solid enough to handle, probably 2 cups more. I used 100 grams of starter to leaven the bread, that's probably why. In addition, my Israeli bread flour acts differently than the American flours, I'm sure.

The crust was light, but chewy rather than crisp and crackly, the crumb pierced with small holes. It was dense and somewhat moist, like the dark Russian breads available here, but by no means underdone or pasty. I did wait till the loaf cooled down completely before cutting. I liked this SD version, and think I might make a garlic loaf like Abra's with it. I haven't tried the bread with commercial yeast yet.

Miriam
Miriam Kresh
blog:[blog='www.israelikitchen.com'][/blog]

#259 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 26 November 2006 - 03:38 AM

Well, I FINALLY have a rye version bubbling away on the counter. Will go into the oven around noonish. I do so love rye, flavor and texture.

I think this was the best dressing ever at Thanksgiving this year. I make my own turkey stock, and added the heels left over from this recipe in addition to leftover cornbread and biscuits. So nice, it didn't even need gravy! I have some white heels and a heel from the raisin loaf that will be incorporated into a bread pudding soon. This is a bread that recycles very nicely. I like that. I am sure it will produce fluffy bread crumbs as well for the next schnitzel I do up.

I am also doing a version with spelt. Am looking forward to a rye/spelt mix in the future, maybe. Am also intrigued with the idea of a chef. Maybe I will pull some of my rye ferment.

Great recipe.

#260 dougal

dougal
  • participating member
  • 1,279 posts
  • Location:England

Posted 26 November 2006 - 11:18 AM

I noticed that a couple of people were trying more yeast/less time, so I thought I'd give that a try. (Cause I'm catching a plane at the crack of dawn tomorrow.)

Did 1 tsp yeast, then (being a man of extremes) put it in a quite warm oven (150).

....
Long story, I don't think it's as good. Denser (like, don't drop it on your toe), little oven spring, more elastic/rubbery. *Very* big holes interspersed with much finer/denser grain.
...

View Post

I think you were lucky to get away as well as you did.
Bread yeasts are normally said to be killed by 55 Centigrade (~130F). So 150F was overdoing it a bit.

Its normally said that a longer, slower, fermentation gives a "better" flavour.
And that this is due to there being more time for enzymes to produce more of the complex sugars (from the raw material of starch) and hence produce a more multi-dimensional taste.
Rye is a good additional source of those amylase enzymes...
Sourdough brings good bacteria and different yeasts to add to the party.





Before I worked through the entire thread, and importantly before I remembered that our teaspoons are bigger than yours... (1 UK standard teaspoon is 1.2 US standard teaspoons) I had a batch mixed. Which may be a bit wet and a bit salty. We will see!


I'd offer the following simple suggestion for a 'normalised' basic recipe from the conversions given earlier, plus a slight increase in salt (and which will be used for my next effort)

500g flour
400g water
10g salt
1g instant yeast


While there may be minor adjustments for particular flour types, (perhaps 5% extra water when some strong, wholemeal or rye flour is used) using weight (or 'mass') measurements does dramatically improve the accuracy with which a recipe can be communicated.
And the units themselves don't have to be translated.
Apart from teaspoons, the "cup" seems to vary from 200cc (or is it 180) in Japan, to 237cc (US kitchen) and 240cc (US Legal use) to 250cc in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. (Source: Wikipedia.)

Oh, and metric units do make scaling recipes really easy, even if, like me, you think in feet, inches, miles, etc.

And looking at the quantities above, especially in comparison to the original specification, doesn't 80% hydration, and 2% salt, just leap out at you?
"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

#261 jackal10

jackal10
  • participating member
  • 5,036 posts

Posted 26 November 2006 - 11:52 AM

and you might want to make a starter sponge with, say 30% of the flour:

Sponge:
150g flour
75g water
1g yeast

Rough mix and Ferment 12 hours at 70F

Dough:

All the sponge
350g flour
325g water
10g salt

Rough mix; put in oiled bowl and fold sides to middle every half hour for 2 hours; then shape and prove for 2 hours or overnight in the fridge; bake in a hot casserole

(edit I'm guessing the timings - it depends on your yeast and the temperature. For sourdough its 12 hours for the sponge and 4 hours from mixing to baking the dough. Yeast will go 3-4 times quicker. Go by feel, and underprove rather than overprove.

Edited by jackal10, 26 November 2006 - 12:17 PM.


#262 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 26 November 2006 - 12:10 PM

I'm going to try your approach next, Jack. But I'm really liking the addition of 20% semolina flour, so I might have to tweak that into it. Has anyone else tried that? I think it's a major flavor boost, but maybe it's just me.

#263 cdh

cdh
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,231 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia area

Posted 26 November 2006 - 02:36 PM

I've been playing with this recipe a bit recently and am having all sorts of fun.

Most recently I decided to experiment a bit with the recipe... working a few tablespoons of olive oil into the dough... substituting milk for water... substituting liquid brewing yeast slurry for instant baking yeast... folding herbs and black pepper into the dough...

All have come out quite good, provided I stick to the ratio of flour to liquid and keep the yeast additions small.

I've got 3 or 4 varieties of S. Cerevisiae sitting in my fridge now that each produces a very distinctly different beer... must experiment and see how their differences express themselves in bread.
Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

----- De Gustibus Non Disputandum Est

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

#264 annecros

annecros
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,643 posts
  • Location:South Broward County, Florida

Posted 26 November 2006 - 03:42 PM

I've been playing with this recipe a bit recently and am having all sorts of fun. 

Most recently I decided to experiment a bit with the recipe... working a few tablespoons of olive oil into the dough... substituting milk for water... substituting liquid brewing yeast slurry for instant baking yeast... folding herbs and black pepper into the dough...

All have come out quite good, provided I stick to the ratio of flour to liquid and keep the yeast additions small.

I've got 3 or 4 varieties of S. Cerevisiae sitting in my fridge now that each produces a very distinctly different beer... must experiment and see how their differences express themselves in bread.

View Post



Husband and I were discussing a beer bread. Glad to hear the milk and oil were workable.

Subbing in one third rye flour worked very well, the loaf is almost gone along with a sizable hunk of Lurpak. The spelt was wonderful as well, and this no knead technique is ideal for it.

This really is a lot of fun. Am baking a loaf off tomorrow AM for hubby's Secret Santa gift. They are supposed to do one dollar gifts for four days, and a ten dollar gift Friday.

#265 cdh

cdh
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,231 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia area

Posted 26 November 2006 - 04:53 PM

It isn't just beer that got added... it was 2cc of the thick cloudy yeast slurry that accumulates at the bottom of beer fermentation chambers. (Homebrewing has its privileges!) Beer all by itself may not have any yeast still in it... lots of commercial breweries filter it all out.

If you're looking to use beer yeast, make sure to get a bottle conditioned beer, and only use the cloudy dregs at the bottom of the bottle.
Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

----- De Gustibus Non Disputandum Est

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

#266 tamiam

tamiam
  • participating member
  • 216 posts
  • Location:Kitsap Peninsula, WA

Posted 26 November 2006 - 05:22 PM

It isn't just beer that got added... it was 2cc of the thick cloudy yeast slurry that accumulates at the bottom of beer fermentation chambers. (Homebrewing has its privileges!) Beer all by itself may not have any yeast still in it... lots of commercial breweries filter it all out.


Darn, we just tossed out most recent beer sludge. Guess we'll have to make more.

I am confused. Are you using the sludge as a yeast source or as the flour? We'd love to find a way to bring our beermaking and our breadmaking together.
Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther

#267 cdh

cdh
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,231 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia area

Posted 26 November 2006 - 05:36 PM

The sludge is the yeast. The sludge is yeast... with a few coagulated proteins in there too...
Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

----- De Gustibus Non Disputandum Est

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

#268 tamiam

tamiam
  • participating member
  • 216 posts
  • Location:Kitsap Peninsula, WA

Posted 26 November 2006 - 05:42 PM

But, isn't that yeast pretty well used up and dead? :blink: It just finished fermenting all the beer. (well, obviously it is working for you)
Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther

#269 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 26 November 2006 - 06:05 PM

Tamiam, if you could get the fantastically delicious flavor of your latest brew into that bread, you could be a millionaire baker! It's a brilliant idea, if it works. I still remember how good the beer was with the roasted garlic bread.

#270 tammylc

tammylc
  • participating member
  • 2,155 posts
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI

Posted 26 November 2006 - 06:40 PM

Made my first attempt at this bread last night/today, after careful reading of this entire thread. I used 468 grams of King Arthur bread flour, as suggested in RLB's blog. But it was far too dry with only the specified amount of water - I ended up using 14 3/4 ounces (weight - I switched modes on my scale part way through). 2 1/2 tsp Morton coarse kosher salt. The consistency was great when it was done the 18 hour ferment - wet, but not too wet to work. Unfortunately, it stuck horribly to my floured towel, so the finished loaf is not pretty. I also didn't get much oven spring at all.

Here's the pretty side of the loaf, where it didn't stick.
Posted Image

And here's the ugly side:
Posted Image

Not being a huge fan of a really thick crust, I only left the lid on for 20 minutes, then about another 25 with the lid off. I thought the temperature was good, but in retrospect I probably should have left if another five - the bread was a bit moist. And, as others have said, not particularly flavorful. But the crust is just marvelous.

Here's the inside:
Posted Image

Next time I'll try the oiled bowl trick. And maybe proof it longer before baking - I think it wasn't quite ready. And my pot is pretty wide, so I probably should increase the amount of dough to get some better height.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Bread