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jedovaty

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  1. Duuuhhhh *face palm* I knew I was overthinking this. Thanks. I bet the cheap aluminum roasting pans would fit perfectly, have to get measurements.
  2. You must give into the messiness for now, and as you get the techniques, process, and habits down, it'll clean up. The folks here suggested pouring and scraping over parchment/wax paper, rather than directly into the bowl. This helps catch the chocolate and makes it easier to re-use; you'll just have to heat it up and/or retemper, which is not too much a big deal if you are doing small quantities. That, or get a bigger bowl.
  3. Hi there: Given the specifics of my situation below, how would you accomplish a final proof without damaging a delicate dough such as croissants, high hydration demi-baguettes, etc? I got my hands on a used, small wine fridge last year, which has worked well as a temperature controlled chamber for fermentation of anykind such as pickles, sauerkraut, sourdough, yeasted breads, etc. Depending on outside ambient temps, I use either the fridge on its own, or, a heating pad with an inkbird temp/humidity controller. This is fantastic for things easy to cover - the lact
  4. jedovaty

    Brewing Ginger Beer

    Hello: I used to make ginger beer with a bug successfully, and I'm going to give it a go again this year, but before I do I'm hoping someone might be able to help identify trouble spots in my process since it has failed the last three years. Here's my process: Bug - 1T shredded organic ginger (with peel), a cup of water, and 1T sugar dissolved. Then every 24 hours add about 1t each shredded ginger and sugar, and after several days top up with a bit of water - measurements here are all estimated, I found measuring for the bug is a waste of time, this part of the proce
  5. That doesn't work as well for me as blanching in baking-soda water, you get much much cleaner results, although, it takes forever. I know ultimately it doesn't make much of a difference, but I like all the skin removed. All the skin off. Must remove every last bit. All off. *crazy eyes*
  6. Gesundheit? That is one long name for a dessert. How did you peel the almonds? I've only tried once when I made some marzipan, I remember it was even more difficult than hazelnuts. Those I blanch about a pound with some baking soda then take about 20 minutes to "pop" individual nuts. Very tedious.
  7. Thanks for the help here, all Inside joke a success!
  8. I.. I shouldn't be surprised this exists.
  9. I'm at 50% success rate: last year, the apple pie stuck, it was in a large diameter glass pie plate. This year the blueberry pie stuck, it was in the smaller W&S branded usa pan silicon non stick. I ended up scratching the non-stick plate in several places from the blueberry pie trying to get at it That's the reason I want to use the parchment or foil, since this is going to be a super tiny itsy bitsy smol pie - 2" diameter. That's a great idea! Calling them pretties hahaha yes! But as far as focusing on their taste I dunno.. the two I had a couple weeks earlier were b
  10. Hi! I harvested a massive bumper crop of four blueberries. As an inside joke, I'd like to make pie with them. I have left over pie dough and a small ceramic dish used for salt or oil. I think I can bake in it. I've got almost no pie making experience having baked a whopping total of 4 pies my entire life (apple and cherry last year which were mediocre, and cherry and blueberry (from costco) this year which were pretty good). Should I line the dish with foil/parchment to make it easier to remove/eat the pie-lette? Would it be best to bake the base separate from the
  11. Now that's a fascinating idea. Please share if you do it. I'm curious whether it'd be necessary to make a "starter" like they do for mochi donuts (basically you take small portion of the rice flour and gelatinize it with the liquid by nuking in microwave or just heating it on the stove, and mix that into the dough, similar to tang zhong for bread).
  12. I call shenanigans, I didn't get any 😑
  13. jedovaty

    Dinner 2020

    Haven't heard of them, assuming it's a seafood vendor?
  14. jedovaty

    Dinner 2020

    Hmm.. I'll give those a cautious try. I'm a bit spoiled with fresh seafood having a Santa Monica Seafood outlet nearby, and also there's a grocery store near my work that carries some amazing fresh scallops sometimes (6-8 per pound they are HUGE!). 😛
  15. I made these last year.. and after reading a bunch of recipes, and trying twice, these techniques made scallion pancakes to my tastes: - use hot water - do make the oil roux (it's not really a paste/roux like with water as you found out) - knead, knead, knead (I started in food processor, switched to hand), and make sure to knead some more - roll at least the first time as thin as you can; I don't know your KA roller setting, but a 4 on my marcato machine is thick. I rolled by hand, to nearly transparent, but not quite filo dough thinness. I think I used ei
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