Jump to content

AAQuesada

participating member
  • Content Count

    444
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://

Recent Profile Visitors

2,244 profile views
  1. I it was for work I would say it's better to have something a little bigger but in a home setting personally I think its the opposite whats the smallest size that's going to get the job done 80% of the time. You can always run a second batch of dough -no big deal. If the 8qt works for you i'd get that, even if it's not much a smaller footprint makes it easier to move around and clean ect. It just depends, try and guesstimate your volume the best you can. Your other limiting factor is how much you can bake (and eat/give away!)
  2. I've never used the FAMAG but spiral mixers in my experience do much better with smaller quantities than the KA type.
  3. you don't want to get something bigger than you need but if you are going to be doing multiple loaves / large batches say around the holidays.. 10 quarts is reasonable.
  4. i've never been much for milk chocolate but it really works in this recipe. Really like Guittard here, I've tried Callebaut and felt it got lost. Curious how other milk chocolates would fare
  5. These are from Fanny Zannoti. They really are excellent -i'll often add a bit of rye whiskey to it. I was going to link to the recipe as well but i don't see it on her current site. A LOT OF RYE AND A LITTLE MILK CHOCOLATE KIND OF COOKIES makes 24 100g butter 120g light brown sugar 40g caster sugar 2 tsp vanilla extract/paste one egg 90g rye flour 90g plain flour 120g milk chocolate, chopped into chunks 30g rye flakes one tsp flaky seasalt, crushed 1/2 tsp baking powder In a large heatproof bowl,
  6. I've had nothing but problems working with buckwheat (I have cold mountain Soba ko & BRM buckwheat myself) wish I could help but I'm going to stick with my rye chocolate chip cookies lol really looks easy in the video!
  7. they just don't hold up. I've taught culinary school and the KA's are always broken and the Globes just keep working and I'm talking table top. At work I probably have 3 broken KA's in storage. You don't have to believe Teo but its not bad advice to be careful when doing stiff doughs in one
  8. Just used the word pro because i was too lazy to type commercial
  9. Yes I use Pro KA at home and have used them for years at work. It was my financial decision not to buy another for work.
  10. Those commercial KA's are not very good. your 35 yo is probably built better. Last time I had a choice I picked the Globe SP05 to replace a KA. We've had no problems since.
  11. Globes are great workhorse mixers. That being said I completely understand not wanting to support the Chinese government. The Famag looks like a very good bread mixer. As a chef its hard not to look at Q/P. The Alpha looks great (hey in a home kitchen that matters) and is at least as good only you can answer if thats enough to justify the extra price.
  12. Have you considered something like the Globe SP08? They are really great work horse machines and have plenty of torque for thick doughs and you won't have to learn a whole new type of machine. Spiral mixers are great for bread (and only because it's a specialist) but they really are a different animal and you most likely going to want to have a KA around for Cakes/cookies ect. Platetary mixers are generalist machines. But really imo spiral mixers are really more useful for bakeries. In a home setting even an advanced one I just don't see the advantage. So much gluten development ca
  13. my two notes would be on a boning knife most of the time you are really using the first 1/3 of blade. just worry about the tip and flat. note 2 would be if you reallllly want to get that back part - save your broken pieces of stone for that (I call them finger stones) then work it with that smaller piece.
  14. Found a BA video making this cookie at the shop. I don't know if thats helpful or if you've seen it. Buckwheat Chocolate chip recipe Video link
  15. I use a Japanese version from Nisshin called 'cooking four' in English if you have a Japanese market in your area
×
×
  • Create New...