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Cake Fondant

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#1 pastryjen

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Posted 07 May 2002 - 12:09 PM

I have a question for Steve Klc.  Once a cake is covered with rolled fondant, can it then be refrigerated, or will it become sticky and absorb odors?  And can you give any recommendations on how to cover, decorate and safely deliver a six tier wedding cake?

#2 Steve Klc

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Posted 07 May 2002 - 06:07 PM

Hi pastryjen--yes, you can technically put a rolled fondant covered cake tier back in the fridge.  Cover it with plastic wrap, when you remove it from the fridge, allow it to thaw to room temp with the plastic wrap on--whatever moisture condenses will condense on the plastic.  This is more of an issue in humid environments at certain times of the year.  But your instincts are right about rolled fondant--it contains sugar and any sugar product wouldn't do well in the fridge uncovered.  (For non-bakers and home decorators--rolled fondant is a type of malleable, soft cake covering or "icing" that is rolled out thinly like pie dough, draped over a cake and smoothed out to leave a very refined, elegant surface.)  

Another way to approach this question is to ask why do you want to put the cake back in the fridge in the first place?  You could design a cake and filling that doesn't need to be in the fridge--or design it in such a way that your decoration can be removeable and placed on later rather than requiring hours and days of piping on the actual cake.  Choose ganaches, buttercreams, gelees, even acidic curds can sit out a long time.  Depending on your level of skill, it usually isn't a problem covering your cake tiers with rolled fondant on the morning of the event.  The day before, make sure all tiers are built and closed with buttercream and let them sit overnight in the fridge.  There have been times when I've covered cakes the last thing the night before and left them out it in a cool or air conditioned room.  Personally, I'd avoid messing with the fridge unless you absolutely have to for food safety reasons--like if you have a "creme brulee" type filling in the cake.  In that case it needs to stay in the fridge until the last possible moment.

Delivery is the more serious issue. It's sustained high-stress--as stressful as working on any line during crunch time. It's one of little things pros never teach or talk about or put in their books--because, well, then anyone could do it, right? There's no substitute for experience in developing confidence and this is one of the best reasons for hiring a large cake specialist. Are you worried about how to deliver--i.e. drive a 6-tier cake?  It shouldn't be any different than a smaller 3-tiered cake--it just is heavier and you'd need help--i.e. extra bodies and hands--if you try to deliver it in one piece, whole.  Either that, or you design a cake which can be assembled on site--meaning bring the 6 individual tiers covered in rf and then build it with dowel rods there, including piping your royal icing shell or bead borders there, put the decor on there, etc.

Obviously, transporting something like this is even more complicated in warm/hot weather.

Another option is to design a separated tier cake where each tier is on its own base--with dowel rods extending an inch above each tier--and then stacked on site. In this case it's pretty easy to put each tier in its own insulated box even with a little gel pack if necessary.

Give me some more specifics about what you've committed to do for your client, how far you have to drive, if the reception is in or outdoors and what else you're concerned about specifically and I'll talk you through it so you don't take an unnecessary risk. Is some of this beyond your level--do you need me to go over how to roll out fondant?  Have you done it before?
Steve Klc

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#3 singsgood

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Posted 01 October 2003 - 02:56 PM

I had to make this cake way ahead of time (I really did!), and I won't need it for another 11 days. I have frozen decorated fondant cakes before, with good results, but this cake is my masterpiece...I'm the one who double-posted about rolled fondant figures...instead of making these ahead, and attaching them last-minute to the 3-layer, marzipan-and-fondant-covered cake, I decided (for my son's 21st birthday) to make the four members of his band as having had too much champagne - they are sprawled all over the top of the "bed" decorated cake with bottles strewn about. The figures, being fondant, are fused to the cake surface and are now part of it. It looks just as I hoped it would - no, better! - and I am loathe to ruin it by freezing. (I used commercial Wilton fondant.)

I know if I had a fruitcake I would be ok to leave it out, but it is a 3-layer buttercake...(no perishable fillings) I know I can't refrigerate it- it will sweat and go gummy. What do you think? Do I plastic-wrap and foil-wrap it, freeze it and hope for the best? I know marzipan and the icing will provide a sort of "seal" for a cake, but for how long? I don't want it to go mouldy!

This is such a showcase cake that I doubt it will be eaten anyway. If I have to choose between leaving it out somewhere cool and freezing/losing quality, I choose the first.

Sorry to sound so ignorant, but I am desperate not to ruin it. (Added dilemma - it weighs a ton and has to go on an 8-hr journey..if I do freeze, how long to thaw before I box it for transporting? or do I take it frozen?)

Doesn't anybody besides me ever have to complete a showcase cake way ahead of time?
If anyone can help me, I would be so thankful.

#4 chefette

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Posted 01 October 2003 - 03:52 PM

so you're telling us that you have one mega big freezer with lots of available space - we will all be right over with things to freeze. :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

You should be able to freeze your cake. Personally I would not have decorated it first, but... Wrap it up as tightly as you can in plastic or a box if it will fit in your freezer. Remove it and keep it sealed. Sounds like the drive should do it allowing it to come to room temp before unsealing or unwrapping.

I would not underestimate the desire of people to dig in and eat up this cake regardless of its showcasability. cake is cake after all.

#5 singsgood

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Posted 01 October 2003 - 06:01 PM

Thanks so much!

I will wait till fondant is completely dried and then wrap it up...and I don't have a huge empty freezer, but I do have two of them so that helps :smile:

I wouldn't ordinarily decorate a cake first either, but in this case, the "decorations," the Barbie and Ken-sized, anatomically correct caricaturized four figures, are part and parcel of the cake now. One of the reasons I planned ahead and did it was because I was afraid it wouldn't work out as I wanted it to..it was pretty ambitious for me...and I didn't want to be furiously baking/decorating another birthday cake the day before the trip.

Anyway, I appreciate the advice.

#6 havemycake

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 07:49 AM

Hi there!
In my experience, you can freeze fondant covered cakes. It's the thawing that poses the challenge. You have to thaw it in the refridgerator about 2 days ahead. If you go from freezer to countertop, you'll have a skating rink and you'll have to wait another couple of days for it to dry out on its own.

Hope this helps. :smile:

#7 singsgood

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 08:30 AM

Thanks for the tip. I am a little confused though about defrosting in the fridge...I have read (and always done this) that refrigeration of fondant icing will cause too much condensation, even if the cake is still wrapped well, and goes very gummy. Whether this is true when it is going from frozen to thawed is another question. I have always read (and again, done this) that the best way to thaw is at cool room temperature with original wrapping still in place, to pick up any condensation.

Would be interested to hear anyone else's comments.

#8 havemycake

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Posted 06 October 2003 - 10:38 AM

If refrigeration would cause too much condensation, then what would freezing do? :wink: When I thaw in the fridge, I take the wrapping off,. I think thawing in the fridge allows the temperature to rise more gradually as opposed to going from frozen to room temperature, which would definitely cause the cake to break a sweat! :biggrin:

But then again..others will likely have different ideas. :smile:

#9 Tepee

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 08:23 AM

I notice that this section is for Pastry & Baking. Does it cover Cake-Decorating? If not, can you pls move this to the appropriate section? Thank you.

My question is - sometimes I notice some sagging on a fondant-covered cake on the next day. I usually decorate the day before required. Is it due to the cake settling? Is there any way of avoiding this? TIA!
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#10 fiftydollars

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 08:47 AM

Is the actual cake under the fondant sagging or is it the fondant?

#11 gibfalc

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 09:12 AM

I would also like to ask if you are refrigerating the cake. The humidity could soften the fondant and cause it to sag.

#12 chefpeon

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 10:26 AM

Hi TP......
:laugh: hee hee.....I figure if I'm an expert on ANYTHING in this life, it's a fondant covered
cake.....I must have done MILLIONS of them....truly.
BUT.....after posting for just a few weeks in this wonderful forum, I have found out how little
I DO know. I'm humbled, but grateful to have found such a wonderful bunch of pros to nosh
with!

I'm lucky where I live in the Pacific Northwest of the USA.....I don't have to deal with humidity or heat. It's nice and cool pretty much all the time here, except for a couple days/weeks in July and August (which is of course, peak wedding season). So I have experienced a few heat related problems, but never as severe as other parts of the world. When it comes to heat and humidity combined I always appreciate the advice of other bakers who deal with it on a daily basis. I'm sure I use a lot of decorating techniques that work great up here but would be complete failures in a different climate. Yes, I'm very fortunate!

I worked with a wonderful pastry chef who moved here from Virginia. She told me that using fondant there was a completely different thing, and on hot humid days she said it had a tendency to kind of "melt off". I don't know EXACTLY what she meant by that, but perhaps that melting off gave the fondant a "sagging" effect. Just guessing.

Questions:
I assume you cover a cold cake with the fondant, decorate it, then put it back in refrigeration
when you are done. Do you notice this sagging the next day, after it's been in refrigeration
all night?
Or do you not refrigerate it after you decorate it to avoid sweating problems? I would imagine
with the heat you have down there that not refrigerating it is sort of not an option.
What kind of fillings do you use in your cakes, and are you generous with the fillings, or do you just spread a thin layer between each layer? fiftydollars asked a good question about whether it
was the fondant that was sagging, or if it was the cake itself. You know that if your cake was a bit taller going in and shorter coming out, then you have a settling problem. Even if it's a couple millimeters.
I personally have never had any sagging problems due to refrigeration, but then, like I say,
I work in an easy climate. The only thing I hate about refrigerating a fondant covered cake
is the sweating, but I really have no choice....I have to refrigerate my cakes.

When I teach newbies how to cover cakes in fondant, I have noticed they tend to roll out their
fondant kind of on the thick side. They would get all frustrated that the fondant would start to sag and tear on the sides before they were able to finish smoothing it out. When I asked why they rolled it so thick, they'd tell me that the thicker fondant looked smoother on the cake, which is true, but the weight of the fondant pulled itself down and created a lot more problems than not.
It's key to roll out the fondant to just the right thickness.....thick enough so that it doesn't show minor bumps and flaws on the cake, and thin enough so that it doesn't stretch itself out before you've smoothed and adhered it to the sides. Fondant that's too thick and heavy WILL pull itself down even after you've had a chance to adhere it in some cases. My ideal fondant thickness is approximately just under a quarter inch or 5 millimeters.
Also the type of fondant you are using could be the cause. I have noticed major behavior differences in varying brands. And I don't know whether you are buying commercially made fondant there in Malaysia and if it's a brand similar or the same as US brands, or if you're making your fondant yourself. There are so many variables!

These are my thoughts.....hmmm....not sure if I've helped or confused you more!
:wacko: Annie

#13 aidensnd

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 05:49 PM

Is the fondant sagging in the center of the cake? If so then it's the cake settling.

#14 Tepee

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 05:50 PM

You people are so lucky you don't have to deal with this heat and humidity problem! Currently, it's 102 degF outside!

I normally freeze my cakes for better handling (for sculpting). After 2 hours out, I fill it with 4 mm thick buttercream (usually SMBC). Then I smear as thinly as I can a crumb-coat or rather a coat to use as adhesive. Press the cake down a little. I then let the cake settle down for another hour. While I'm covering the cake with 5 mm of fondant, the cake is still cold with beads of condensation. Everything looks fine until the next day I see the fondant sagging. Round layer cakes (3" high) don't seem to have that problem, but cakes which are shaped and higher than 3" like this one sagged so badly that the sides are not straight anymore. I had to take the pic from this angle to avoid the sag showing, but, hey, that wasn't such a bad idea coz the cake doesn't look too bad from this angle. :biggrin:

Posted Image

BTW, I make my own fondant using The Cake Bible's recipe, but I had to reduce the glucose syrup slightly and add 1/2 tablespoon gelatin. I found the original recipe's elasticity just wasn't enough. Our stores don't sell fondant or gumpaste or tylose powder or CMC or....you get the drift.

Edited by TP(M'sia), 12 May 2004 - 05:53 PM.

TPcal!
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#15 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 06:28 AM

It's key to roll out the fondant to just the right thickness.....thick enough so that it doesn't show minor bumps and flaws on the cake, and thin enough so that it doesn't stretch itself out before you've smoothed and adhered it to the sides. Fondant that's too thick and heavy WILL pull itself down even after you've had a chance to adhere it in some cases. My ideal fondant thickness is approximately just under a quarter inch or 5 millimeters.
Also the type of fondant you are using could be the cause. I have noticed major behavior differences in varying brands. And I don't know whether you are buying commercially made fondant there in Malaysia and if it's a brand similar or the same as US brands, or if you're making your fondant yourself. There are so many variables!

I agree strongly with Annies points. It's important to be thin because the weight of the fondant pulls itself downward. I also have noticed considerable differences in brands of fondant. Since your making yours you may need to do more adjustin in your recipe.

You wrote you only do a thin pre-coat of frosting under the fondant. I don't use a thick coating but I definately use more buttercream than a pre-coat. I think if your frosting is too thin, then your fondant might not be ahearing as well as it should to the sides of the cake-so that would allow gravity to drag it down like your experiencing.

I've dealt with horrible condensation problems with refriderated cakes, but I've never had my fondant sage because of the humity....it can sort of melt-but thats different.

I can understand not wanting to pay the expense of shipping purchased fondant, but it's so wondeful to have conviently ready at hand all the time. You can buy all the special ingredients you need over the internet from several very good sources, do you need leads?

Do you have a website, I'm really enjoying looking at your cakes, I'd love to see more?

#16 JanKK

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 07:15 AM

Ok ...a question for all you fondant users :) .......

I've done fondant cakes before and they LOOK beautiful .........but I've found they mostly don't TASTE very good.

Anyone have any tips or secrets they would care to share for better tasting fondant? Any suggestions for a good ready-made brand or a recipe?


Thanks!
--Jan

#17 crc

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 08:44 AM

I make my own, because I developed a formula, which I am happy with, have used it for years, it is consistent and I can flavor it with any complementing flavor of the cake, I am covering it with. I make it in 16-20# batches (better texture control). Sometimes I mix it with marzipan for an almond fondant and white chocolate plastique for white chocolate flavor. This you can roll pretty thin.

That said, some commercial brands taste better than others..however fondant is a personal taste thing...either you like it or you don't! Great decorating medium though! Very little middle ground here..
Satin Ice is one of the more popular brands, Wiltons - Yuk! but to each its own! Cal Java has a great white Chocolate & white chocolate raspberry one. Pettinice, there has been mixed reviews about this one lately but some people swear by it.
Albert Uster carries one that is Masa Tacino so does Patis France, which is similar to the British commercial sugarpaste Regalice. Then there is ChocoPan..a bit pricey but very flavorful and can be rolled very thin too, a bit soft to work with.

Rolling it thin really helps with the sagging. Fondant can be very heavy
Wendy, have you tried using a fan on it after you have pulled it out of the refrigerator? That helps sometimes
Yes..it is great to have some at hand...so I keep some extra in the freezer!
HTH

Edited by crc, 13 May 2004 - 09:00 AM.

Portia

#18 chefpeon

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 02:38 PM

I've been thinking about your sagging problem a lot today.
I really can't say for SURE what could be causing it, because that has never happened to
me.....well, it has, but my fondant would sag right away because I rolled it too thick or whatever.
I've never covered a cake and then had the fondant sag hours later.
My fondant always stays put.

I'm INCLINED to think that your recipe produces a very soft fondant.....am I right?
This could explain the sagging, especially with heat and humidity.

I've always used commercially made fondant, because I go through SO MUCH of it. I don't have the time to make it myself. Pettinice is what I usually use and it's pretty good. You gotta work really fast with it though because it's starts to "crust up" pretty quickly.
A lot of people don't like to work with a fondant that is that unforgiving. People who don't do fondant a lot, like to feel they have enough time from roll-out to covering. In my case, I've done
so many and do it so fast that working with unforgiving fondant is sort of a non-issue.

So, in conclusion, my best rootin' tootin' troubleshootin' guess is that it's your recipe, and maybe you should try tweaking it a bit more, and see if it makes a difference.

So there is no bakery supplier in Malaysia that stocks ready-made fondant? :huh:

Cheers! :laugh: Annie

#19 Tepee

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 06:42 PM

I've been thinking about your sagging problem a lot today.

:wacko: LOL! That's not a pretty thought!

Thanks, everyone, for your help. Yes, I think the problem lies with my fondant, and sometimes the thickness. I usually just estimate the amount of glucose syrup to add...it's so yucky to handle...so I think on days when I add too much, it makes the fondant heavier and wetter...so much so that the wetness cannot be treated by adding more confectioner's sugar. Will try to be a good girl and measure properly next time.

Fondant is not available in our shops, mainly becoz, fondant cakes are not "seen" here. Everywhere I bring my cakes, it seems like it's the 1st time anyone has seen them. And, yes, you either love it ir hate it, so I tell people to feel free to peel it off if they don't care for the extreme sweetness. I don't think my fondant tastes too bad...as I flavor it according to the flavor of the cake. Oh, that brings me to another don't-have. Can't find clear vanilla here too. One day, I'll bite the bullet and get these stuff online, but, fondant, I think not, since it's so heavy and will really add to the shipping costs. I've tried marshmallow fondant, but don't really find much difference to the fondant I make.

Edited by TP(M'sia), 13 May 2004 - 06:49 PM.

TPcal!
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#20 chefpeon

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 07:04 PM

Not sure if you knew......
but clear vanilla is artificial flavor. If you're a vanilla purist, and you don't want
to add color to icings, etc.....it's better to use vanilla powder.
:wub: Annie

#21 Tepee

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 07:32 PM

Thanks, Annie! I didn't know that. I've a LOT to learn. :rolleyes: Do you mean to say, vanilla powder can be added to fondant? And, is vanillin powder the same as vanilla powder? TIA.

Edited by TP(M'sia), 13 May 2004 - 07:33 PM.

TPcal!
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Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

#22 chefpeon

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 08:04 PM

Artificial vanillin simulates 1 flavor component out of over 250 different flavor components found in natural vanilla. It is a by product of the wood industry or is produced from petro-chemicals.



No, vanillin powder and vanilla powder are not the same. When you see the word "vanillin" as a primary ingredient in your vanilla product, that's a pretty good indicator that it's artificial in nature.
No reason you couldn't use vanilla powder in fondant!

:laugh: Annie

#23 Kerry

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 09:52 PM

I have a question for Steve Klc.  Once a cake is covered with rolled fondant, can it then be refrigerated, or will it become sticky and absorb odors?  And can you give any recommendations on how to cover, decorate and safely deliver a six tier wedding cake?

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#24 Kerry

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Posted 20 September 2004 - 10:01 PM

Pastry Jen:

More thoughts on rolled fondant covered cakes.

You may like to know that you can freeze crumb-coated rolled fondant covered cakes with non perishable fillings. Cakes should be boxed then inserted into plastic bags, frozen and when needed defrosted overnight. Do not pipe or add side or top decorations until the cake is restored to room temperature. If you have a busy bakery and need to bake early in the week it frees one's time for the decorative aspects when the pressure is on for weekend weddings.

Best,

Kerry Vincent

#25 *Deborah*

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 02:19 PM

Wow am I glad I decided to come to this site when I did.

I am an enthusiastic if not necessarily skilled home cake baker. I would say my skill is more in picking recipes I can manage. I have pretty good home tools, including a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer (the light of my life, really) but not a lot of specialized stuff.

In a moment of weakness and shocking ambition, I offered to bake my best friend's wedding cake. We have decided on a recipe which seems eminently doable for the small (20-person) party (Rose Levy Beranbaum chocolate truffle cake: chocolate, eggs, and butter) due to the small number of ingredients, and fairly simple prep. I have gotten three or four good wedding cake books (including Dede Wilson's) and have come up with a plan to cover it with fondant and modelled ivy leaves (one 10-in. tier with one 6-in tier on top, not separated with columns, something like Rose Levy Berenbaum's Art Deco Cake, if anyone is familiar with that, and we're making it big for the number of people so we can all have seconds)...so basically pretty simple as my decorating skills, in particular, are not anything to write home about. It will be served with a raspberry coulis and Chantilly and some IQF raspberries if I can find 'em.

Historically, I have beginner's luck in all manner of cooking, so I am relying on that to see me through. The second wedding cake I attempt to make will probably be a disaster, but I expect the first to turn out OK. That's why I'm not making a practice one (that, and the cost of good chocolate).

The wedding is January 22, in Whistler. I live in Vancouver, and the cake will have to be transported up there in a car; I am already collecting boxes. My major concern at the moment is timing: it seems as though this particular cake can easily wait four or five days to be served, and it probably will have to as I am also maid of honour and have other things I need to do, but can anyone offer tips as far as how long I can expect it to take me to put fondant on, whether I should roll or use the other kind (I think not as I think cool temps are important to this cake, I don't want to have it melt all over my counter--is that a valid worry?) and is store-bought fondant really OK, especially if you have no confidence in being able to make it!!! and is it OK to store it assembled like that, refrigerated, for a few days and then stick on the leaves on the day?

I plan to bake on the 18th, assemble and put fondant on the 19th, have the 20th in case of emergencies, and then it will be brought up to the site on the 21st.

I would be really grateful for any tips anyone could provide.

Thanks in advance :smile:

Deborah

Edited by *Deborah*, 11 December 2004 - 02:20 PM.

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#26 K8memphis

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 11:55 AM

...In a moment of weakness and shocking ambition, I offered to bake my best friend's wedding cake. ...
Historically, I have beginner's luck in all manner of cooking, so I am relying on that to see me through. The second wedding cake I attempt to make will probably be a disaster, but I expect the first to turn out OK. That's why I'm not making a practice one (that, and the cost of good chocolate).

The wedding is January 22, in Whistler. I live in Vancouver, and the cake will have to be transported up there in a car; I am already collecting boxes. My major concern at the moment is timing: it seems as though this particular cake can easily wait four or five days to be served, and it probably will have to as I am also maid of honour and have other things I need to do, but can anyone offer tips as far as how long I can expect it to take me to put fondant on, whether I should roll or use the other kind (I think not as I think cool temps are important to this cake, I don't want to have it melt all over my counter--is that a valid worry?) and is store-bought fondant really OK, especially if you have no confidence in being able to make it!!! and is it OK to store it assembled like that, refrigerated, for a few days and then stick on the leaves on the day?

I plan to bake on the 18th, assemble and put fondant on the 19th, have the 20th in case of emergencies, and then it will be brought up to the site on the 21st.

I would be really grateful for any tips anyone could provide.

Thanks in advance :smile:

Deborah

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OK I finally got it - I been thinking about your post - make three wedding cakes - two in advance so you know what you're up against - or at least three fondant covered cakes. Since the first will be perfect and the second will be a disaster, you need to plan on the third one for the real deal :biggrin:

Because the only person that can give you tips as to how long it will take is you.

You mean rolled fondant or ganache or buttercream??? In a not hot kitchen you should be fine with any of them.

Everything is a valid worry especially the part about beginners luck with wedding cakes.

I have an easy recipe for some great cake covering. You use one part candy clay which is candy melts and corn syrup and two parts marshmallow fondant which is marshmallows and confectioners' sugar - it makes a great rolled fondant to use on cake like this. Umm, but purchased fondant is fine - I hear that Wilton's is awful - I believed everybody & never bought it. So use one of the other brands like Pettinice and be sure to add some flavoring.

Let me know if you want that recipe. Marshmallow fondant maybe sounds inglorious but it's great great stuff - very user friendly for me anyway.

You really want to have a good handle on this. You will need to roll out a circle of stuff at least 18 inches big and be able to lift it over the cake and smooth it out & trim it for the 10 inch cake -

Do your last things first - put stuff in your car now to make the seat level for the cake box - get that bubbly kina shelf liner to set the cake on so it doesn't slide in the box or in the car - be sure your box fits in the car doors - like get your box ready - one box is enough btw - get your cake board/s ready - make in advance decorations - make your icing - make your filling - then bake your cake - that kind of thing.

Good luck!! Have fun!!

#27 *Deborah*

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 12:08 PM

Thanks for responding :smile: See, that thing about the Wilton's is exactly what I need to know. I will search out the other brand.

No, I'm quite serious about the beginner's luck: you should have tasted my first osso buco! it was better than any I've had in a restaurant. The second...not so much :laugh: It's a real theme. I truly can't afford to make three of these cakes...I'm going to price fondant today though, so yeah, maybe I can take a practice run on another type of cake.

I intend to give myself a weekend to do the ivy leaves, I'll get into a leaf-making zone. If I fail, I have those little flower watering test-tube things with pierced lids, we can use more real ivy in those.

Oh, when you have two layers, one dirctly on top of the other, do you cover them with fondant separately? and then plop one on top? I think you must, eh? rather than setting one on top and then covering them both. Hence those little bits of icing covering the seam. I have books, I should really read them again before I go asking stupid questions.

Thanks again, I will keep you apprised of my progress and probably bug you with additional questions as time goes by.

:smile:
Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

#28 K8memphis

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 02:33 PM

Absolutely, check your books. Yes, usually you cover each cake individually. And another biggee is proper support so the top tier doesn't crush the bottom tier - some people use straws, or dowels or stress-free support systems. Each tier of course sets on a cardboard of some kind.

Umm, it's easier for me to put the cake on a board the same size or a teensy bit smaller than the cake & set that on my pedastel turntable - rough ice it with buttercream then roll out the fondant and apply it so the sides of the fondant hang down rather than pool on the tabletop & then trim. Then put the covered cake on the right sized board or whatever. That's what easiest for me.

On your timetable, you can bake the cakes a week or so in advance, and fill them, double wrap with plastic wrap and freeze. Then take 'em out & ice & decorate.

Your bottom board needs to be 16 to 18 big. It needs to be either thick enough or enough thicknesses to keep the cake from cracking. You may need a dowel to go all the way through to keep it from sliding. You need some thing to decorate the bottom board. Too bad my camera won't download.

I heartily recommend that you make a rolled fondant cake before you attempt this at the last minute. Marshmallows & candy melts don't cost much. You're making me nervous :laugh:

I already wrote that recipe out somewhere on here - I'm gonna go find it. brb...

#29 K8memphis

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 02:55 PM

Candy clay is 14 oz of chocolate or candy melts or almond bark* melted** & add one third cup of corn syrup, slowly stir together. I let mine sit in the container that I melted it in and smooth it all level on top or it separates. Cover well & let that harden overnight and pinch off & knead it in small portions to soften. If it does separate, just knead it all back together.

Marshmallow fondant is nothing more than a 16 oz bag of marshmallows melted with two tablespoons of water and add two pounds of confectioners sugar - so put one pound of sugar in a bowl, pour in the melted marshmallows & water and any flavoring, mix and add the other pound of sugar - you will need to micro-zap this a few seconds (like 5-6 seconds) here & there to loosen it up so you can knead it all in.

So combine 2 batches mmf with 1 batch candy clay. You can multiply & divide this recipe.

Practice! You gotta' big learning curve, and a crash course here. Read the books!

Oh yah, when you roll this out, rolling it out onto plastic or between two pieces of plastic is a wonderful thing. Some people get upholstery plastic from the fabric store - I am not recommending that - I'm just saying that's what some people do - I use a giant plastic like a silpat that's food safe for sure. Because fondant sucks up confectioners sugar like a sponge and then it gets dry & cracks. Like if you are constantly dusting the table to roll it out so it doesn't stick.

And and and you can pick up the whole plastic to lay it fondant side down on the cake and just peel off the plastic.

Did I mention you were making me nervous?????? :rolleyes:

* cheap cheap ingredients!!

**wull if you can make great 'bukababuka' :biggrin: you know how to melt stuff like this over hot water right?? in a double boiler??? like a pyrex bowl over a pot of hot water - water not touching the bottom of the bowl.

#30 JeanneCake

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 02:57 PM

You can buy the Pettinice (made by Bakels) from Pfeil and Holing at www.cakedeco.com in pails of various sizes/prices. This would be ok with RLB's truffle cake (which is a delicious cake, especially the raspberry version). I've made the cake many times, and in my experience, it handles best when it is very, very cold. If you have any gaps or mishapen sides, use some just-firm ganache to fill in and then chill it again overnight. If you use the Pettinice, you don't need to use the veg shortening that RLB calls for when using commercially made fondant. Use a little cornstarch and a cool stainless steel table, along with a heavy rolling pin (use a french pin or a 14 or 18 inch rolling pin for best results). The home made fondant from the Cake Bible is more translucent than the commercially made stuff- hard to describe. The fondant in the picture (the Art Deco cake) is thicker than what I usually do; about a quarter-inch to a third of an inch is plenty.

Fondant can be frustrating for a novice the first time; how much do you use? how thin to roll out? what if it tears? Colette Peters' books include a chart for fondant amounts on various cake sizes - you might want to look into borrowing her Wedding Cake book from the library to skim through, but Margaret Braun's Cakewalk book has excellent pictures of fondant application that would be helpful to you. Fondant will show every lump and bump under it so be sure the cake beneath is smooth and blemish free. I would definitely practice putting it on a cake pan before doing it on a real cake.

Good luck!





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