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Korean Food


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49 replies to this topic

#1 guajolote

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 02:55 PM

Maybe we should start a thread on Korean Restaurants?

A couple of years ago there was an article in the Chicago Tribune about how Korean food was the "unexplored" cuisine. The reporter said that one of the reasons was that the front windows were usually covered so you couldn't peek in. I find this to be true for me, I wnt to see what a place looks like before I eat there and it is too embarassing to walk in then walk right back out.

If I went to a Korean restaurant what should I order? I've had Korean food in friend's houses but know very little about it.


#2 torakris

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:00 PM

yuke
yuke
yuke
yuke
yuke
yuke
yuke
yuke
:biggrin:

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#3 Jinmyo

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:00 PM

Everything.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#4 Jinmyo

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:02 PM

Bibimbap.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#5 guajolote

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:07 PM

I've had Korean sweet/spicy chicken wings. What are these called?

Yuke is definate yes. I love BiBimBap, have even been making it at home.


#6 GordonCooks

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:07 PM

Yuke is for tourists :biggrin:

Ja ja myun!

#7 Jason Perlow

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:11 PM

Depending on whether you are going to a specialized korean restaurant or a full service restaurant you are going to see different kinds of dishes.

but for starters, the basics:

0) Banchan/Panchan, you'll get these complimentary as sort of an appetizer. Various pickled and marinated veggies and little appetizer dishes of all sorts of little things. The most popular form is kimchi, which is cabbage that is fermented in spicy chili sauce.

1) Bulgogi and Galbi (Kalbi, Galbee, etc) marinated meats, beef and beef short ribs grilled over a fire, usually on special grill tables. Wrap with lettuce and pickled condiments and rice, with hot bean paste and raw garlic and fresh chiles. This is often referred to as Korean barbeque and there are other variations including different cuts of beef in different marinades as well as pork and seafood.

2) Bibimbap: Marinated chopped up cooked meats served over rice with various pickled vegetables and egg, sort of the Korean equivalent to Japanese donburi.

3) Jap Chae: Sauteed Noodle dish made with clear noodles, beef, and vegetables.

4) Jigae: Various kinds of stews.

5) Mandoo: korean dumplings, similar to japanese and chinese types. Can be served fried or steamed, sometimes stirfried with vegetables and filled with pork, beef, and kimchi. Also served in soup.

6) Pajun: A type of flour pancake similar to chinese scallion pancakes, but thicker and usually filled with scallions, chili peppers and various kinds of seafood.
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#8 Jinmyo

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:13 PM

Yuke is for tourists :biggrin:

Ja ja myun!

Ja ja myun is noodles with black bean sauce. A Chinese-style dish invented in Korea.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#9 torakris

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:21 PM

some favorites of mine is US restaurants

bulkalbi BBQ beef with the bone still attatched, it MUST have the bone!

all of the kimchis and namuls they have to offer

chijimi preferably with either seafood or kimchi (savory pancake?)

the name is currently eluding me, the soup like dish of a whole chicken cooked with rice, natsume (sorry I only know the Japanese word but i think they might be called jujubes in English a kind of date) and ginseng, this is soooooo wonderful!

ojingeo pokkum a stirfried squid dish with a kojuchang sauce

also look for a dish (my favorite is stirfired in a kojuchang sauce) of the korean mochi, preferably the tubular ones

and of course you need to start and finish the meal with yuke, and maybe one in the middle of the meal too just for the ehck of it! :biggrin:

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#10 torakris

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:24 PM

Yuke is for tourists :biggrin:

Ja ja myun!

Ja ja myun is noodles with black bean sauce. A Chinese-style dish invented in Korea.

ja ja myun is wonderful, back in college one of my Korean friends would make this for me almost daily, I currently have two packs of the instant one is my cupboard :shock:
I know, shame on me!

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#11 SobaAddict70

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:28 PM

Ok, please to explain "yuke".

Something tells me this is an alcoholic-based drink, and thus off limits to me. :angry: Oh well. Maybe in my next life. :blink:

Cheers,

Soba

#12 Jason Perlow

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:31 PM

Ok, please to explain "yuke".

Something tells me this is an alcoholic-based drink, and thus off limits to me.    :angry:  Oh well.  Maybe in my next life. :blink:

Cheers,

Soba

Heaping pile of raw beef with raw egg on top.

http://forums.egulle...ST/f/21/t/18921
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#13 SobaAddict70

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:32 PM

hm, just read the thread on yuke.

Well, not off limits to me. Thanks, Dr. J.

Praise the food goddess. :smile:

Cheers,

Soba

#14 Jinmyo

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:35 PM

also look for a dish (my favorite is stirfired in a kojuchang sauce) of the korean mochi, preferably the tubular ones

These are called tteok. Wonderful, especially in soups but also great stir-fried or grilled with beef.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#15 Jason Perlow

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 03:38 PM

also look for a dish (my favorite is stirfired in a kojuchang sauce) of the korean mochi, preferably the tubular ones

These are called tteok. Wonderful, especially in soups but also great stir-fried or grilled with beef.

Sometimes also called rice cakes. I prefer them stirfried.

These are also used in Shanghainese cuisine as well.
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#16 scamhi

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 04:44 PM

Soo doo boo chi gae -spicy soft bean curd stew with seafood

Kimchi bokum -stir fry of pork kimchi and rice cakes in a spicy sauce and plain bean curd served on he side

Jae ok bokum- same as above with squid

Sulong tang- Soup made from beef bones-cloudy broth. served with thin noodles slices of beef and scallions and salt.
very soothing.

#17 Jinmyo

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 05:14 PM

See, guajolote? Everything.

One of the world's great cuisines.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#18 indiagirl

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Posted 31 March 2003 - 06:50 PM

indeed one of the worlds greatest cuisine. the potato and pea curry (i'm in a hurry, monday is the day i do all of things that i should have done on the weekend) simmering on my stove just aint gonna do it now

:(

doesn't anyone like the mung bean cakes - i like those

#19 torakris

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Posted 01 April 2003 - 04:02 PM

Check out this site for information on Korean food!


http://www.asiafood.org/types.cfm

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#20 indiagirl

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Posted 01 April 2003 - 04:44 PM

oh no. even on that website they maintain the mung bean cakes silence.

are mung bean cakes fake korean? am i being subjected to a city wide hoax? sigh, i like 'em so.

#21 torakris

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Posted 01 April 2003 - 06:21 PM

oh no. even on that website they maintain the mung bean cakes silence.

are mung bean cakes fake korean? am i being subjected to a city wide hoax? sigh, i like 'em so.

can you describe the mung bean cakes?
do you know what they are called in Korean?

Is is chijimi? often made from mung bean flour? a type of savory pancake?

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#22 GordonCooks

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Posted 02 April 2003 - 05:17 AM

oh no. even on that website they maintain the mung bean cakes silence.

are mung bean cakes fake korean? am i being subjected to a city wide hoax? sigh, i like 'em so.

Do you mean the savory cakes usually yellow in color or the sweet red bean cakes ?

#23 indiagirl

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Posted 02 April 2003 - 05:30 AM

torakris, GC,

they are about 3-4 inches in diameter and appear shallow fried and have a texture that is smoother than one would expect from using whole beans, so flour may be the answer.

they are savory

the next time i stop in there, i will be sure to ask!

also, upon consideration, i have realized that only our "fancy" korean restaurant has them on the menu. not the two cafeteria style ones on campus.

#24 scamhi

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Posted 02 April 2003 - 07:14 AM

[quote name='torakris' date='Apr 2 2003, 01:21 AM'][quote name='indiagirl' date='Apr 2 2003, 08:44 AM'] can you describe the mung bean cakes?
do you know what they are called in Korean?

Is is chijimi? often made from mung bean flour? a type of savory pancake?[/QUOTE]
Mung bean cakes are very Korean.
In Korean they are called Bindaetteok.
mung bean cakes and recipe

#25 Jinmyo

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Posted 02 April 2003 - 08:00 AM

Oh, these are great. I actually keep some frozen ones on hand so I can pull one out, let it thaw a bit, and then heat in a toaster for a quick bite.

edit:
A good site. Here is the main recipe page: Bi BAM!

Edited by Jinmyo, 02 April 2003 - 08:36 AM.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#26 tissue

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Posted 02 April 2003 - 09:20 AM

Hot fish casserole.

Naeng Myum in the summer.

Soon tofu pot with seafood.

Black pork belly bbq.

#27 torakris

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Posted 02 April 2003 - 03:54 PM

My two favorite summer lunches are naeng myun and bibimmyun.

These are quite popular in Japan and now you can buy close to instant versions in the refrigerator section of most supermarkets.

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#28 coastcat

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 07:07 PM

And for a variation on the question...

What would you order at a Korean restaurant if you are an unadventurous eater who avoids anything spicy other than garlic? I'd like to take my husband to a Korean place, but am not sure what standard menu items won't frighten him. (no spice, no cabbage, no shellfish) I think he'll be okay with bulgogi and perhaps jap chae (he's a huge fan of pad thai but might be leery of clear noodles - I'm not kidding about the "unadventurous" description), but would like some other suggestions just in case.

#29 tissue

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Posted 04 April 2003 - 09:05 AM

Galbi, tried and true.

#30 torakris

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Posted 04 April 2003 - 06:23 PM

And for a variation on the question...

What would you order at a Korean restaurant if you are an unadventurous eater who avoids anything spicy other than garlic? I'd like to take my husband to a Korean place, but am not sure what standard menu items won't frighten him. (no spice, no cabbage, no shellfish)  I think he'll be okay with bulgogi and perhaps jap chae (he's a huge fan of pad thai but might be leery of clear noodles - I'm not kidding about the "unadventurous" description), but would like some other suggestions just in case.

go with
bulgoki/ bulkalbi
chap chae
mandu (pot stickers)
savory pancake type thingies, ones that don't have seafood
bibimbap (ask for the sauce on the side, if it isn't served that way)

Depending on how authentic it is there may be a variety of Japanese dishes on the menu as well, teriyakis, tonkatsu, etc.

I am also sure the menu has will show (by a special symbol or star) which are the spicy items.

Good luck! and just think more kimchi for you! :biggrin:

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