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pho tai


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12 replies to this topic

#1 riboflavinjoe

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 03:58 AM

hey, im interested in making pho, as in pho tai, that wicked soup available at vietnamese places. so, it's beef stock, vermicelli, onion slices, scallion, and beef shavings... tell me though, what is it that makes the beef stock so magically vietnamese? is it ginger and coriander? there must be something else, and i want to know!!! any help would be greatly appreciated...
"Bells will ring, ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting.... the bell... bing... 'moray" -John Daker

#2 chopper

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 06:44 AM

Joe, at souvenir d'indochine, they infuse there beef stock with ginger, fresh coriander stalks, star anis and cinnamon sticks; you can also use coriander seeds but they'll cloud your stock...

Don't forget some salt and sugar to round off seasonning,

It's all pretty standard...
Michel

#3 riboflavinjoe

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 07:36 AM

thanks chopper.

by the way...

Hi How Are You.

looking forward to seeing you sometime soon.
"Bells will ring, ting-a-ling-a-ling, ting.... the bell... bing... 'moray" -John Daker

#4 Ruth

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 07:42 AM

I think it is definitely the star anise that gives it that unique "pho" flavor
Ruth Friedman

#5 dave88

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 09:15 AM

Dont forget the fennel. Use oxtails for the stock.

#6 Jason Perlow

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 09:24 AM

Just remember pho is not just the sum of its parts. This stock is very time intensive to make. Its a royal pain in the ass.
Jason Perlow
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#7 Stone

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 11:52 PM

Just remember pho is not just the sum of its parts. This stock is very time intensive to make. Its a royal pain in the ass.

Jason's right. I don't think someone could just "figure it out." That's why so many pho places are mediocre. I remember reading an article on the wall at Pho 75, my first pho joint on Wilson Boulevard in Rosslyn, VA. They described the years of training the pho cook had, and the hours and hours that went into making the stock. Still some of the best broth of any kind I've ever had. I had some pho yesterday out in the Avenues in SF, it just wasn't that good. The stock was a cloudy grey, and it was sweet without the beefy flavor.

Edited by Stone, 09 March 2003 - 11:52 PM.


#8 dave88

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Posted 10 March 2003 - 12:06 AM

Well, "Stone," before the 75 on Wilson in Rosslyn, there was the 75 in Rockville and one in Falls Church off Arlington Bl.

There have been many imitators, tho no duplicators.

The 75 in Rosslyn has recently raised their large bowl prices to $7, which has lead me to frequent the Rockville (where it rocks) location and the Arlington location (where one can still buy cigarrettes).

Pho Ga is their chicken version that's very tasty. Ask for the "chicken oil."

Ph“ (no sp. char. support) is the sum of all its parts. One needs to know the parts and their assembly.

Sorry, Perlow.

#9 Kerouac1964

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Posted 10 March 2003 - 11:23 AM

Posted Image

You can always cheat, and purchase canned broth !! I've tried this product, and it's not bad!! It's a clearish broth and has that hint of the exotic seasonings that make Pho ... um, Pho. :wink:

#10 Jason Perlow

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Posted 10 March 2003 - 05:45 PM

Ph“ (no sp. char. support) is the sum of all its parts.  One needs to know the parts and their assembly.

Sorry, Perlow.

So you've made Pho from scratch then?
Jason Perlow
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#11 fifi

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Posted 10 March 2003 - 08:22 PM

OK... I am getting intrigued. I have several 1/2 cup portions of glace de viande in the freezer. After a full weekend of lousy weather spent making this gold, now I want to use some. If I read James Peterson right, this is a good way to store smaller quantities of this stuff and then dilute as appropriate for whatever useage. Can I do this and make pho? Or did the reduction somehow change the flavor? I did use oxtails as well as neck bones. If you started from scratch with oxtails, how long do you simmer them to make a pho broth? When do you put the other flavoring stuff in? How long to simmer? So many questions... so much time.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

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#12 tommy

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Posted 10 March 2003 - 08:48 PM

Ph“ (no sp. char. support) is the sum of all its parts.  One needs to know the parts and their assembly.

Sorry, Perlow.

So you've made Pho from scratch then?

i agree with both of you. i've made faux pho before, and it comes out as good as most of the lack-luster vietnamese places in NYC. however, i've never hit the mark like some of my favorite places. sure, if i had the time, the exact ingredients, and the exact technique, i could duplicate it. but i don't.

#13 jawbone

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Posted 11 March 2003 - 07:51 AM

I've made pho a couple times from scratch. It turned out well but ended up being about as expensive to make as to buy (it's hard to find inexpensive oxtails). And a whole lot more trouble (I live across the street from a pho joint).

One ingredient I haven't seen mentioned yet is fish sauce. Also, the recipes that I have consulted all called for the onion and ginger to be charred either over a flame or on an extremely hot dry pan. I haven't tried making the broth without these steps so I don't know what difference it would make omitting them.

One other problem with making it at home is that I don't have any vietnamese coriander growing in my herb pot -- getting some (and thai basil) requires a trek to Chinatown.

But I do love pho bo...