Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Best cookware for induction hob?


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 barbhealy

barbhealy
  • participating member
  • 65 posts
  • Location:Naperville, IL

Posted 18 July 2011 - 01:47 PM

In two days we will be replacing our ceramic glass electric cooktop with Miele Induction (!) and I will need to replace most of my cookware.

I have read, multiple times, the understanding stovetop cookware thread as well as all of the Q&A associated with that course and the only clear recommendation was for Mauviel Indoc'Inox which is no longer available.

So, what is the best cookware currently available for induction hobs, from a construction / functionality standpoint, regardless of price?


I need the following (sizes are approximate and my biggest hob is 11"):

1. 11-12 inch fry pan used mostly for eggs (I do not use non-stick) (Demeyere Proline? Cast iron?)

2. 5qt conical sauteuse used primarily for risotto (Demeyere Atlantis?)

3. 2qt conical sauteuse used for hollandaise and similar (De Buyer Prima Matera Copper Induction?)

4. 6-9qt rondeau/saute my go-to pan used for everything from frying fish to making stew (Paderno Grand Gourmet**? Demeyere Atlantis or Apollo? Mauviel M'Cook?)

5. 4qt sauce used primarily for thick soups, sauces, beans, rice, etc (Iittala Tools? AllClad D5? Mauviel M'Cook?)

6. 8qt pasta/chili pot (Paderno Grand Gourmet**?)

**Is Paderno World Cuisine Grand Gourmet the same as Paderno Grand Gourmet?



I realize that none of my suggestions may be ideal but that is all I am familiar with so please offer alternatives. If possible, please support your suggestions with an explanation (either technical or practical)....


Price is no object. In fact, I prefer to pay for beautiful design, if it is also functional, than to save money on something that is equally functional but not beautiful.

I prefer to buy American-made but that is less important than performance.

I prefer welded handles and pouring lips but they are also less important than performance.

Weight is no object.

Although I wash all our cookware by hand, I would like to be able to put them in the dishwasher on occasion.

Note: On my ceramic glass electric cooktop Demeyere performs a bit like cast iron -- retaining heat longer, even when removed from the cooktop -- and I predict it will not be responsive on the induction hob either.

Thanks in advance!
Barb

(Does anyone have some old Induc'Inox they want to sell me?)

#2 boilsover

boilsover
  • participating member
  • 80 posts

Posted 18 July 2011 - 02:10 PM

Hi, Barb:

The Prima Matera line seems an excellent choice for everything you want, except perhaps the DW.

If you get any, please write a review?

Thanks!

#3 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,314 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 18 July 2011 - 04:43 PM

I recently was able to use several pieces of CIA Masters cookware at the home of a friend and we both found it to be easy to use on the induction burners as well as on gas burners.

It goes through the dishwasher and cleans up beautifully. The welds are very strong and the balance makes these easier to handle than some cookware.

I used the 12 inch fry pan which has a helper handle which is a huge plus.

I also used the 3 qt saute pan also with a helper handle and one of the sauciers, not sure if it was the 2 or 3 qt.

We also used a couple of sauce pans and these have a rolled edge that facilitates pouring. (My one complaint about my All Clad is the straight side.

I'm going to be buying a set of this for a wedding gift in late September, as I think it is an excellent product.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#4 lesliec

lesliec
  • host
  • 1,096 posts
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand

Posted 18 July 2011 - 07:42 PM

Hi Barb.

We went induction just before Christmas and we're loving it. Heaps of power, heaps of control.

Forgive the perhaps obvious question: are you sure you need to replace your stuff? Have you done the fridge magnet test? We found all our old pots and pans, except one tiny pan we rarely used and our roasting dishes, were quite happy on induction. The only real adjustment I had to make was to start making gravy for roasts in a saucepan rather than in the roasting dish.

Enjoy it!

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory


#5 barbhealy

barbhealy
  • participating member
  • 65 posts
  • Location:Naperville, IL

Posted 18 July 2011 - 10:46 PM

The Prima Matera line seems an excellent choice for everything you want, except perhaps the DW.

Why would the Prima Matera be the best choice for all my needs and not just the sauteuse?


I recently was able to use several pieces of CIA Masters cookware at the home of a friend and we both found it to be easy to use on the induction burners as well as on gas burners.

Thanks, Andiesenji! I didn't realize there was another straight-gauge clad copper option (other than All Clad). Were they more responsive on induction than on gas or was the response time the same?


Forgive the perhaps obvious question: are you sure you need to replace your stuff?

Yes, I did the magnet test right after we made the decision to convert. The majority of my current pots and pans are All Clad LTD, Iittala Tools, Le Creuset and tin lined copper. Iittala and Le Creuset are the only ones that are compatible. Even the pressure cooker and stock pots (16 and 32 qt) have to be replaced. I have a tagine, too, which I suppose I will have to get a disc for.


The only real adjustment I had to make was to start making gravy for roasts in a saucepan rather than in the roasting dish.

I have a Mauviel roasting pan which I believe is induction compatible. The only time I roast, though, is at our Thanksgiving Dinner and I found a way around the last minute gravy scramble: my husband loves leftover turkey breast sandwiches and there never seems to be enough left over so I bought an extra breast, roasted it the day before, and made gravy with the drippings. He was happy and I had one less thing to worry about.

Edited by barbhealy, 18 July 2011 - 10:48 PM.


#6 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,444 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 19 July 2011 - 04:20 AM

All Clad stainless is induction compatible - so if you love your All Clad LTD you should like it. I have a number of pieces that I use for induction (and I use the LTD on my gas stove).

I have a big slope sided Meyer pan I use for candy on induction. It has a disc on the bottom - but that's fine on the induction hob where is isn't on the gas.

#7 JAZ

JAZ
  • manager
  • 4,901 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 19 July 2011 - 06:19 AM

I have Demeyere Sirocco at home, and use the Atlantis line on the Miele induction range where I teach and find them both excellent (dishwasher safe, too). I don't notice a problem with responsiveness on the induction range. Incidentally, both those lines have a thick copper layer in the straight sided pieces -- much thicker than what's in the All Clad Copper Core line.

#8 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,314 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 19 July 2011 - 06:33 AM


I recently was able to use several pieces of CIA Masters cookware at the home of a friend and we both found it to be easy to use on the induction burners as well as on gas burners.

Thanks, Andiesenji! I didn't realize there was another straight-gauge clad copper option (other than All Clad). Were they more responsive on induction than on gas or was the response time the same?



I particularly noticed the excellent response time in the fry pan, especially when I was cooking scallops and in the covered saute pan some mussels. They were almost as good as in my SS lined copper on a gas burner but enough lighter that it made them easier to handle.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#9 David A. Goldfarb

David A. Goldfarb
  • participating member
  • 1,307 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, HI

Posted 19 July 2011 - 11:33 AM

(Does anyone have some old Induc'Inox they want to sell me?)


I haven't checked recently, but call (don't rely on their website for anything but the phone number) Zabar's on the upper west side of Manhattan, and ask if they still have any pieces in stock. They carried it, and I've noticed new old stock Induc'Inox pieces on the shelf when I've stopped in, plus they could have more in the stockroom.

#10 barbhealy

barbhealy
  • participating member
  • 65 posts
  • Location:Naperville, IL

Posted 19 July 2011 - 06:35 PM

I haven't checked recently, but call (don't rely on their website for anything but the phone number) Zabar's on the upper west side of Manhattan, and ask if they still have any pieces in stock. They carried it, and I've noticed new old stock Induc'Inox pieces on the shelf when I've stopped in, plus they could have more in the stockroom.


thank.gif

Thank you, David!

They had a few pieces which are on their way to me now! No Fait-toute, unfortunately, but they did have a 4qt saucepan and a few other pieces that I need.

When they arrive, I will compare them to the other brands I have and post an update.

I'm still open to suggestions on the other pieces...Even if Prima Matera is fabulous, they don't make all the shapes and sizes I need.

#11 carlux

carlux
  • participating member
  • 63 posts
  • Location:Carlux, France

Posted 20 July 2011 - 07:30 AM

I have had the Miele Induction cooktop for several years, and I love it. I also like good cookware. Since I have all my pots hanging on grids in my kitchen, it's important that they look good and work well. Living in France, I don't know most of the brands that you mention - in fact the major supermarkets here have some very good and attractive stainless suitable for induction, as does IKEA.

My advice is not to get too hung up on this. Certainly here most good pots are made to work with induction, and marked as such. One thing to remember if you do have something you have already used, and consider it to be suitable is whether the bottom is completely flat. If it's been used on gas, it may have developed slight warps, which will make the contact with the induction burner less efficient.

Hope you enjoy it. I wouldn't have anything else.

#12 David A. Goldfarb

David A. Goldfarb
  • participating member
  • 1,307 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, HI

Posted 20 July 2011 - 03:30 PM

Glad to hear that worked out!

#13 Sam Iam

Sam Iam
  • society donor
  • 250 posts

Posted 01 August 2011 - 08:55 AM

The Viking line of magnetic stainless is extensive. We completely switched over, and now have close to 20 pieces. Add the word "expensive" to "extensive". :laugh: :blink: :wub: Several skillets and pots of Le Creuset complete the mix.
Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

#14 mharpo

mharpo
  • society donor
  • 68 posts

Posted 23 April 2012 - 01:07 PM

The Viking line of magnetic stainless is extensive. We completely switched over, and now have close to 20 pieces. Add the word "expensive" to "extensive". :laugh: :blink: :wub: Several skillets and pots of Le Creuset complete the mix.


The Viking cookware is very nice and I particularly like the handles, though I wouldn't pay for the premium for the Viking name on Demeyere pans. Viking cookware is made by Demeyere, as you probably know...

As for induction cookware, I bought a couple of pieces of the Prima Matera, to try out the competition, and I can tell you that it is better on an induction hob than anything else I've tried, though it is ridiculously expensive for 2.0mm stainless-lined copper cookware.

I am not a huge fan of induction, but it is very good at boiling water... :laugh:
Michael Harp
CopperPans.com

#15 ermintrude

ermintrude
  • participating member
  • 451 posts

Posted 23 April 2012 - 03:42 PM

I use spring crystal http://www.spring.ch...=1&PARENT=3&l=1 it's not cheap but works brilliantly with induction as it reacts v quickly. It's a 5 layer design Stainless steel/Aluminium/Iron/Aluminium/Stainless steel, it looks good and works well on any hob. Downside is it's not cheap, I was lucky to get trade price as doing some work for a firm who could get it.

Very well made, if you boil something and place a lid on and let it cool, I've had times where if the rims were spotless (no splashes etc) I've had to reheat the pan to break the pressure seal thats formed. Not always a good thing but does show the fine tolerance of manufacture.
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

#16 Sam Iam

Sam Iam
  • society donor
  • 250 posts

Posted 23 April 2012 - 05:37 PM

20 pieces of Viking for us, with a Wolf 36" induction cooktop. Also, a thin Wolf exhaust hood, for a mid-century home. We're both 1000% happy--- ask away with any questions.

Also, There are cast iron plates that allow you to use other cookware.
Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

#17 jaynesb

jaynesb
  • society donor
  • 204 posts
  • Location:Long Island, NY

Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:36 PM

I'm not quite answering the question but thought I'd jump in with a suggestion for what to do with those favorite pans that aren't magnetic.

When we switched to induction, we had a few non-magnetic pans that really aren't made in an induction-suitable version. I wasn't as happy using the conversion disk. Specifically, the pans were (1)a Whirley Pop aluminum popcorn pan and (2) an ibrik (a small copper and tin pot for making Turkish coffee.)

So we bought a single portable electric burner/hot plate. I think it's by Broil King and we got the ceramic kind but I think they also make a coil version. It's kept stored away for the most part. We typically aren't using it at the same time as the induction cooktop. So for popcorn, we typically put the burner on top of the cooktop surface so we can use our ventilation system. I think we also used it during our kitchen renovation and in theory, it is also an extra cooking surface if we ever need it.

This solution works for us because both pans didn't have very wide diameters. The portable unit wouldn't have helped much if the cookware had been a large skillet.

Jayne

#18 Dave Hatfield

Dave Hatfield
  • participating member
  • 1,590 posts
  • Location:Rural France

Posted 01 May 2012 - 12:53 AM

We were forced into induction about a year ago when we bought our new house. Putting in gas would have been a major hassle.

We bought a selection of induction friendly pots & pans from IKEA. They look good, cook well, clean easily and so far show no sign of wear despite heavy use.
Thus, if you live anywhere near an IKEA I can heartily recommend these to you. The prices are good as well.

We have since installed a smaller second kitchen and have done what jayesb recommends above. We put in a small two burner electric hob. There I can still use my much loved set of copper clad pots & pans from Dansk. I've had them for 25 years & they're still going strong.

#19 HowardLi

HowardLi
  • participating member
  • 416 posts

Posted 22 May 2012 - 03:17 PM

Also, There are cast iron plates that allow you to use other cookware.

Seems as though this would eliminate one of the major advantages of induction cooking, that being immediate response to thermal input.