Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Cake Round to Pastry Form Conversion

Dessert

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 gfron1

gfron1
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,369 posts
  • Location:Silver City, NM

Posted 11 September 2007 - 06:43 AM

I prefer to make individual desserts rather than larger cakes. And generally I make the individual desserts in 3 inch pastry forms. I've never seen a conversion, so I simply reduce the temperature by 25 degrees and watch them closely.

Are there any tried and true conversion rules that can be used? Specifically, this weekend I want to take an almond genoise that was intended for an 8" round and use my 3" forms.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#2 jumanggy

jumanggy
  • participating member
  • 506 posts
  • Location:Harlem in New York

Posted 11 September 2007 - 07:58 AM

I tried to think about how to set up an integral for the problem, but I must have forgotten much of my college math :raz: I've never heard of conversion rules for such a need (maybe it's time for us to set it up? 8" cakes' baking time vs. 3" same cakes' baking time? Graph, make the equation.. x axis= old baking time, y axis= new baking time)

I would love to make individual desserts as they seem to get eaten more easily (small pastry rings are expensive, though..). If there's a time for a 13x9" pan, maybe you could punch out the genoise from the sheet instead.
Mark
The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)
No Special Effects - my reader-friendly blog about food and life.

#3 gfron1

gfron1
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,369 posts
  • Location:Silver City, NM

Posted 11 September 2007 - 08:04 AM

Oh right, and the 13x9 conversion. Surely someone has done this work before and its in a fancy chart with pretty colors. But it gets complicated very quickly because of the material that the vessel is made of and the type of batter.

Often with 13x9 I just bake it in that dish and punch out my individual rounds, but that still leaves a lot of waste.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#4 alanamoana

alanamoana
  • participating member
  • 2,738 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 11 September 2007 - 09:54 AM

rob, i don't think there's any sort of fancy conversion to use. most pastry chefs (okay, maybe just me) just use an oven set to pretty much the same temp always and rotate and check things regularly. after you make things a few times, you get used to how long it takes.

i'd say at work, my commercial convection oven is almost always at 350F or 375F and i just keep an eye on stuff. not very scientific, sorry! :wink:

#5 chefpeon

chefpeon
  • participating member
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location:Tinytown, WA, USA

Posted 11 September 2007 - 11:07 AM

rob, i don't think there's any sort of fancy conversion to use.  most pastry chefs (okay, maybe just me) just use an oven set to pretty much the same temp always and rotate and check things regularly.  after you make things a few times, you get used to how long it takes.

i'd say at work, my commercial convection oven is almost always at 350F or 375F and i just keep an eye on stuff.  not very scientific, sorry!  :wink:

View Post


Ditto that. No sense making something more complicated than it needs to be.
I've never found a batter or dough that wouldn't work just because I used a pan that
wasn't called for in the recipe. :wink:

#6 sugarseattle

sugarseattle
  • participating member
  • 349 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 11 September 2007 - 02:10 PM

Often when I switch from big cakes to cupcakes, I need a little more structure (aka flour) to help get a nice dome on the little guy. but yes, the smaller the cake, the shorter the window for proper doneness.

i sometimes have trouble when I'm switching up pan sizes willy nilly...like my recipe makes 6-10" cakes and I want to make 3" cakes, how many 3" cakes will my recipe make? For that kind of thing, the cake bible has that handy chart which shows pan volumes which help; however it's in "cups" I think and it's difficult to look at a recipe and determine how many cups it will make. You could do it by weight, and do a general "sponge" type cakes are 2oz/3" ring, and "butter" cakes are 3 oz/3" ring and so on...
Stephanie Crocker
Sugar Bakery + Cafe

#7 chefpeon

chefpeon
  • participating member
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location:Tinytown, WA, USA

Posted 11 September 2007 - 04:29 PM

i sometimes have trouble when I'm switching up pan sizes willy nilly...like my recipe makes 6-10" cakes and I want to make 3" cakes, how many 3" cakes will my recipe make? For that kind of thing, the cake bible has that handy chart which shows pan volumes which help; however it's in "cups" I think and it's difficult to look at a recipe and determine how many cups it will make. You could do it by weight, and do a general "sponge" type cakes are 2oz/3" ring, and "butter" cakes are 3 oz/3" ring and so on...


Heck, I don't even mess with that. If I have leftover batter, I can save it to make a marble cake later (but not too much later), or I always bake off cupcakes. It's great to have a stash of well wrapped frozen cupcakes around when someone shows up and wants you to pull something out of your butt on short notice. :raz:

#8 alanamoana

alanamoana
  • participating member
  • 2,738 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 11 September 2007 - 11:37 PM

i sometimes have trouble when I'm switching up pan sizes willy nilly...like my recipe makes 6-10" cakes and I want to make 3" cakes, how many 3" cakes will my recipe make? For that kind of thing, the cake bible has that handy chart which shows pan volumes which help; however it's in "cups" I think and it's difficult to look at a recipe and determine how many cups it will make. You could do it by weight, and do a general "sponge" type cakes are 2oz/3" ring, and "butter" cakes are 3 oz/3" ring and so on...


Heck, I don't even mess with that. If I have leftover batter, I can save it to make a marble cake later (but not too much later), or I always bake off cupcakes. It's great to have a stash of well wrapped frozen cupcakes around when someone shows up and wants you to pull something out of your butt on short notice. :raz:

View Post



hmmm, butt flavored cupcakes! :blink:

#9 chefpeon

chefpeon
  • participating member
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location:Tinytown, WA, USA

Posted 13 September 2007 - 10:06 AM

hmmm, butt flavored cupcakes


It's my signature dessert. What else do you expect from an anal retentive pastry chef? :laugh:





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Dessert