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Food Shutter Bug Club (Part 1)


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#541 Holly Moore

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 05:50 PM

AdSum-RestaurantWeek-TunaCapaccio.jpg

Tuna carpaccio shot outside at dusk with no flash using Nikon D90 with Nikkor 17-35 f/2.8 lens as a jpg. Polished a bit using photoshop curves - auto.

So how do I get the plate back to white or shoot it so the plate never picks up blue tint?
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#542 Dakki

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 07:14 PM

Hi Holly, FastStone Image Viewer is a free to use, lightweight, ridiculously friendly program that does simple snapshot editing.

http://www.faststone.org/
This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#543 robirdstx

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 07:46 PM

Holly - can you reset the white balance before you take your photo with your camera?

#544 Holly Moore

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 08:20 PM

I'm still learning the D90, but believe it is possible. The settings show white balance as auto. Will pull out the manual tomorrow and see what else I can do.

As to Faststone Viewer I'm not seeing what that can do for me. Before getting Photoshop I used Photoshop Elements for a number of years. I also have a first level understanding of Photoshop - know levels, hue, saturation and such. What happens though is that I can't figure out how to get rid of the blue on white plates using Photoshop without screwing up the rest of the picture.

The support forums say to take care of it in Raw, but the raw images are so big that they eat up major disk space - especially since I save one untouched pic, one edited pic at high quality pixel level and one cut down to 75 dpi and to 300-600 pixels wide for the web.

I may be looking for an easy solution where there is none.
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#545 dcarch

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 08:27 PM

AdSum-RestaurantWeek-TunaCapaccio.jpg

Tuna carpaccio shot outside at dusk with no flash using Nikon D90 with Nikkor 17-35 f/2.8 lens as a jpg. Polished a bit using photoshop curves - auto.

So how do I get the plate back to white or shoot it so the plate never picks up blue tint?


I use Corel to do this:

dcarch

Posted Image

#546 Holly Moore

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 08:42 PM

Nice on the white. How did you do it?
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#547 Blether

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 12:05 AM

I very rarely do any post-process on my digital photos, but I did this:

Posted Image


desultorily with Photoshop (version CS4), using Image - Adjustments - Color Balance. You can vary the three colour vectors separately for shadows, midtones and highlights.

An easier option is Image - Adjustments - Variations, whose use you'll find self-explanatory.

Edited by Blether, 18 September 2010 - 12:13 AM.

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#548 Blether

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 12:10 AM

Oh yes, and if you're serious about processing large-size image files, get yourself / build yourself / have made a machine (PC) with at least 4 disks in RAID 10. Used to be the 3ware controllers themselves cost like USD1,500 - now good enough ones come built in as 'Intel Intelliraid', and disks are cheap. Get Seagate - the Western Digitals (as of early 2009) didn't support NCQ in RAID mode. YMMV.

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#549 Dakki

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 02:09 AM

Sorry Holly I totally missed the part where you were already using photoshop and high-end gear.

Anyway since this is post-processing night here's my hamfisted attempt, done with the FSIV sharpen and color adjustment tools on a 7 year old Dell in under 2 minutes. :P

Posted Image
This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#550 prasantrin

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 05:22 AM

Just glancing at the three samples of post-processing, I would say Dakki's looks the most processed(colours are oversaturated), Blether's looks the least processed (most like the original), and dcarch's looks to be in the middle. Personally, I prefer Blether's re-do as it doesn't have that "fake" look that oversaturation produces although dcarch's "pops" more. But different eyes have different POVs, so the "ideal" result is very subjective.

Holly--you can change the white balance by pressing on the +/- button and turning the back (I think) wheel to the left or right, depending on if you wnat + or -.

I would actually prefer to learn how to adjust these things before taking a picture rather than after. Too many people rely on post-processing and fail to learn about the basics of taking a good picture. I see a lot of food photos that are very clearly processed (usually overprocessed), and to me, those just aren't as interesting.

#551 Dakki

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 05:50 AM

How's this?

Posted Image
This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#552 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 09:16 AM

Heh, well if everyone else is giving it a go... Cooled it down, sharpened and levels adjusted in Aperture.

Posted Image
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#553 Holly Moore

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:18 AM

DSC_0562-m.jpg

Thanks all. I tried again in Photoshop, starting from a copy of the raw data in jpg format. I selected curves and used the preset "lighten" option and then went to color balance and stepped down the blue and stepped up the red - both just a little bit.
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#554 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:25 AM

Oh well yeah...having access to the raw file would help. I was wondering why the original picture was of such low quality.
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#555 Holly Moore

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:51 AM

That's why I fessed up to having access to the raw jpg. The original file is too big to upload to eGullet. I looked through the approaches taken here with the pic and then took a second stab. The info from the thread was a big help in pointing me in the right direction - or at least a more right direction.
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#556 prasantrin

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 10:54 AM

http://dinersjournal...-shooting-food/

Very useful basic info regarding camera settings for food photography, especially about white balance.

Andrew Scrivani has an ongoing series of food photography tips as part of the NYTimes blogs. Worth reading if you're interested in food photography.

#557 dcarch

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 11:56 AM

Much better.

What do you think? Need more green for the pea shoots? less red for the fish? whiter background?

dcarch

Posted Image

#558 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 12:30 PM

Looks great to me, just counted 7 times your little picture has show up on this page :cool:
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#559 Holly Moore

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 01:24 PM

Looks great to me, just counted 7 times your little picture has show up on this page :cool:


Exposed, I am. Of what, I don't know.
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#560 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 01:49 PM

My alter ego Captain Obvious sometimes shows up to the forum.
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#561 Holly Moore

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 02:38 PM

Huh? Not sure what Captain Obvious has been snorting and no idea what is being implied, but I received a bunch of solid advice - kinda the purpose of this thread.
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#562 robirdstx

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 03:25 PM

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/07/28/food-photography-four-manual-settings-you-need-to-know-for-shooting-food/

Very useful basic info regarding camera settings for food photography, especially about white balance.

Andrew Scrivani has an ongoing series of food photography tips as part of the NYTimes blogs. Worth reading if you're interested in food photography.


Thank you so much for this link. I did some more searching on "white balance" and found this site here.

#563 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 03:36 PM

Huh? Not sure what Captain Obvious has been snorting and no idea what is being implied, but I received a bunch of solid advice - kinda the purpose of this thread.


There is some crazy miscommunication going on here. I just pointed out the obvious (all the pictures of tuna) then called myself out in the next post as quoting the obvious. That's all, just here to give advice like everyone else.
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#564 Blether

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 04:13 PM

... There is some crazy miscommunication going on here. I just pointed out the obvious (all the pictures of tuna) then called myself out in the next post as quoting the obvious. That's all, just here to give advice like everyone else.


And caper about from time to time ?

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#565 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 05:06 PM

:raz:
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#566 percival

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Posted 26 September 2010 - 05:53 AM

Posted Image

Sicilian-style crema rinforzata gelato with Hawaiian candied ginger. Recipe on my blog.

Nikon D3000, AF-S 35mm f/1.8G @ f/2.5, ISO 100. No light box, no fill, no flash. Just foam board on my kitchen countertop and horrid neon lights -- splash tile in the background. I post white balanced off the ring of the bowl. First try on setting it up, just with a teaspoon. Cut up some extra candied ginger to sprinkle on the top, then put the spoon in the bowl.

If I weren't so tired, I would have dug out my macro light and my 60mm f2.0 macro and gone for a brighter diffused creamy white porcelain look.

#567 Rico

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 05:09 PM

All right, I'm becoming obsessed.

I've got a question about this one - actually, a couple of questions:

First - this is pan-fried halibut. Does that look like you'd want halibut to look after cutting into it? I really don't know; I've never made halibut before. It was cooked, but to me the photo looks undercooked.

Second - The fork. Good or bad? It's in front of the main object, so I don't know if the viewer's like 'hey! a fork and some sort of fish stick! That must be some sort of social commentary or something!' When it's really just a picture of halibut.

Thoughts?

Halibut.JPG

Edited to add the thing about it being cooked

Edited by Rico, 12 October 2010 - 05:10 PM.


#568 ScottyBoy

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Posted 12 October 2010 - 08:55 PM

You're right that for halibut it looks undercooked but if you enjoyed it, it flaked and it was cooked then there ya go. To me, fork = no good. I don't like to put anything BUT the food in my shots hence the white plates, no garnish and a white background. The piece is so long that maybe if you had cut it in the middle then offset stacked the pieces it might be a little better. That's my $.02 and all your photos look a x1000 better keep it up!
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#569 Rico

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 07:25 AM

Thanks for the kind words, ScottyBoy, and for the advice. I completely agree with it, and the idea of cutting it in the middle and stacking it is a solid one. I suppose that picture is just going to have to be re-taken with a new batch of fish. I'd be disappointed about that ... but it was really tasty.

#570 Holly Moore

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 01:01 PM

For the last ten years I've used a program from a now defunct company to compress pics before uploading to my web site. I process the pics the Photoshop and then run them through the compression process to get them really small, byte-wise. Alas, my laptop died, and I can't find the cd to load my old software for pic compression onto my new laptop.

A couple of questions,

1. When I adjust image size in Photoshop the pics are still fairly large. Is there a way to ultra-compress in Photoshop?

2. What is a good software compression program to use in lieu of the one I have been using? Freeware would be nice.

Thanks.
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