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Drinks! 2014 (Part 1)


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#31 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 07:54 PM

Trinidad Sour sounds like something I would really like.  Alas, no rye in house, though my local store has a rather nice assortment of brands and bottles.  Not sure if my next paycheck will cover it.  I'd really like to try a bottle of rye to see if I like it.

 

Tonight I'm on my second daiquiri -- of a day that featured lying in the road, in ice water, in the cold rain.  Somewhat glad to be alive however.

 

What I have just noticed, getting back to the topic at hand, is that when I say a drink tastes weak, what I really mean is that the drink tastes low in citrus.  My drinks are certainly never weak in alcohol.  I have not found a mixed drink without lime or lemon, or other acidic fruit that I enjoy.  More the better.  Is this normal?



#32 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 08:07 PM

be that as it may, fernet is fucking vile. and I ain't no non-drinker.

 

This here, kids, is a person that cannot be trusted. It's on par with disliking kittens. Or disliking deformed bald kittens.

 

EDIT

Just made a daiquiri using Rhum JM 50. 2 rum to 1 lime to 0.5 simple. 


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 11 January 2014 - 11:49 PM.

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#33 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 02:29 AM

From a recipe inspired by a killer line from one of my favourite Tom Waits songs.

 

Smoke My Friends Down to the Filter

 

1:1:1 mezcal (Ilegal), Punt e Mes and Campari stirred with .25 oz lemon juice. Strained over a single, particularly robust ice spheroid.

 

I like it a whole lot. At first I thought the mezcal monstered the Punt e Mes and Campari out of the way and that maybe something more assertive like Cynar might be welcome but having had a few sips, now, I think they're there but this is just a more spirit-forward version of a Negroni than I'm familiar with (I always, always, always use the 1:1:1 ratio and distrust people that basically pour gin into a glass and say the word 'Campari' over it). A winner. 

 


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#34 Hassouni

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 10:51 AM

Trinidad Sour sounds like something I would really like.  Alas, no rye in house, though my local store has a rather nice assortment of brands and bottles.  Not sure if my next paycheck will cover it.  I'd really like to try a bottle of rye to see if I like it.

 

Tonight I'm on my second daiquiri -- of a day that featured lying in the road, in ice water, in the cold rain.  Somewhat glad to be alive however.

 

What I have just noticed, getting back to the topic at hand, is that when I say a drink tastes weak, what I really mean is that the drink tastes low in citrus.  My drinks are certainly never weak in alcohol.  I have not found a mixed drink without lime or lemon, or other acidic fruit that I enjoy.  More the better.  Is this normal?

Got a rye-heavy bourbon? I've done it with both Rittenhouse 100 and Wild Turkey 101 and it comes out great both ways.

 

 

 

be that as it may, fernet is fucking vile. and I ain't no non-drinker.

 

This here, kids, is a person that cannot be trusted. It's on par with disliking kittens. Or disliking deformed bald kittens.

 

 

Bah! How about independent thinking, eh?


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#35 Adam George

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:10 PM

One of us! One of us!

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#36 EvergreenDan

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 07:45 PM

Kittens are fucking vile -- the Cake Vodka of the animal world.

 

JNW -- I hope you're okay. Accident? Fall? Sounds bad.


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#37 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 08:38 PM

Kittens are fucking vile -- the Cake Vodka of the animal world.

 

JNW -- I hope you're okay. Accident? Fall? Sounds bad.

 

Thanks for the well wishes.  It was a fall on the way to work.  I walk.  I'm a bit sore and banged up but nothing broken.  I was very fortunate.


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#38 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 08:57 PM

 

Trinidad Sour sounds like something I would really like.  Alas, no rye in house, though my local store has a rather nice assortment of brands and bottles.  Not sure if my next paycheck will cover it.  I'd really like to try a bottle of rye to see if I like it.

 

Tonight I'm on my second daiquiri -- of a day that featured lying in the road, in ice water, in the cold rain.  Somewhat glad to be alive however.

 

What I have just noticed, getting back to the topic at hand, is that when I say a drink tastes weak, what I really mean is that the drink tastes low in citrus.  My drinks are certainly never weak in alcohol.  I have not found a mixed drink without lime or lemon, or other acidic fruit that I enjoy.  More the better.  Is this normal?

 

Got a rye-heavy bourbon? I've done it with both Rittenhouse 100 and Wild Turkey 101 and it comes out great both ways.

 

I have no bourbon either.  I have tasted bourbon, years ago, and I remember that I liked it.  I've read the entire eG thread on rye but still have no firm idea of what it tastes like.  I feel like such a virgin.  One thing I do not like (with all apologies to Canadians) is Canadian blended whiskey.  If rye tastes like blended whiskey I will pass.

 

Is tannic a taste in rye?  If so, are some brands of rye less tannic than others?  As I said I have a lot of local rye choices, including Rittenhouse 100.  Less tannic the better as far as I am concerned.

 

Nothing new to contribute to the thread tonight.  I'm on my second cup of "whiskey" punch made with Black Barrel rum.  I can't believe I made it thtough the bottle.  It may be my last whiskey punch till I find a replacement.  Which won't be till payday.  The recipe does call for rye.


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#39 Rafa

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 10:12 PM

Rye is much closer to bourbon than to Canadian blended whisky, or anything else. Its flavor is generally dryer than bourbon, with less corn sweetness, and more mouth-tingling spice, notably hot cinnamon and white pepper. Brands with a lot of rye grain in the mashbill (Bulleit, Templeton, Dickel rye) can have mint and evergreen flavors as well. If you've liked bourbon in the past then give rye a shot; order some Rittenhouse or Bulleit at a bar.

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#40 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 02:28 AM

Two things. One finer than the other,

 

Margarita following a 2:scant 1:scant 1:mere dash of agave syrup format using Ilegal's reposado mezcal. Pretty flash. 

 

I made a Paper Plane/Aeroplane/Aircraft/Flying Machine from Kindred. 1:1:1:1 with bourbon (Buffalo), Aperol, Amaro Nonino and lemon juice. Should've realised that in Anglais 'accessible introduction to amari' means 'too fucking sweet, like some kind of lolly'. Have attacked it with some orange bitters (Regan's and Angostura).


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#41 EvergreenDan

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 04:36 AM

Poo. Sorry to disappoint you. You made the original Paper Plane (Nonino, Aperol). It isn't my favorite variation, but it should not be sweet. Nonino is pretty dry compared to the average amaro. I'm guessing it needs more acid. Perhaps your lemons were a bit less sour than normal?

 

My favorite variation, which I served to guests two days ago, is Campari and Ramazzotti. It is better than the original -- more bitter and synergistic. It is definitely not sweet. I call this variation a Paper Airplane, a name I got from the chwhnd forum.


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#42 Rafa

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 09:18 AM

@Dan you may like the Cryptic Memo, a Boulevardier variation with rye, Campari, and Ramazzotti that's like an aromatic version of the Paper Airplane.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#43 sbumgarner

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:22 AM

 

I made a Paper Plane/Aeroplane/Aircraft/Flying Machine from Kindred. 1:1:1:1 with bourbon (Buffalo), Aperol, Amaro Nonino and lemon juice. Should've realised that in Anglais 'accessible introduction to amari' means 'too fucking sweet, like some kind of lolly'. Have attacked it with some orange bitters (Regan's and Angostura).

 

Yeah, that's weird, I actually find that drink a touch too dry when made with Buffalo Trace, I find I need something like EC 12 to round it off. I am now intrigued to try Dan's version with Campari and Ramazzotti.



#44 Hassouni

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:26 AM

 

 

Trinidad Sour sounds like something I would really like.  Alas, no rye in house, though my local store has a rather nice assortment of brands and bottles.  Not sure if my next paycheck will cover it.  I'd really like to try a bottle of rye to see if I like it.

 

Tonight I'm on my second daiquiri -- of a day that featured lying in the road, in ice water, in the cold rain.  Somewhat glad to be alive however.

 

What I have just noticed, getting back to the topic at hand, is that when I say a drink tastes weak, what I really mean is that the drink tastes low in citrus.  My drinks are certainly never weak in alcohol.  I have not found a mixed drink without lime or lemon, or other acidic fruit that I enjoy.  More the better.  Is this normal?

 

Got a rye-heavy bourbon? I've done it with both Rittenhouse 100 and Wild Turkey 101 and it comes out great both ways.

 

I have no bourbon either.  I have tasted bourbon, years ago, and I remember that I liked it.  I've read the entire eG thread on rye but still have no firm idea of what it tastes like.  I feel like such a virgin.  One thing I do not like (with all apologies to Canadians) is Canadian blended whiskey.  If rye tastes like blended whiskey I will pass.

 

Is tannic a taste in rye?  If so, are some brands of rye less tannic than others?  As I said I have a lot of local rye choices, including Rittenhouse 100.  Less tannic the better as far as I am concerned.

 

Nothing new to contribute to the thread tonight.  I'm on my second cup of "whiskey" punch made with Black Barrel rum.  I can't believe I made it thtough the bottle.  It may be my last whiskey punch till I find a replacement.  Which won't be till payday.  The recipe does call for rye.

 

 

Rye is much closer to bourbon than to Canadian blended whisky, or anything else. Its flavor is generally dryer than bourbon, with less corn sweetness, and more mouth-tingling spice, notably hot cinnamon and white pepper. Brands with a lot of rye grain in the mashbill (Bulleit, Templeton, Dickel rye) can have mint and evergreen flavors as well. If you've liked bourbon in the past then give rye a shot; order some Rittenhouse or Bulleit at a bar.

 

Rafa hit the nail so squarely on the head I'm not sure what else I can say, but here's my attempt:

 

I prefer rye to bourbon because of the so-described dryness. Granted, this varies in ryes and varies in bourbons, depending on how much rye/corn/wheat is involved.

 

Bourbon must be min. 51% corn, rye must be min 51% rye. What makes up that remaining 49% is open to the distiller. The higher the rye content (for either whisky), the spicier and less sweet it will be.  For example, Bulleit Rye is 95% rye. I believe Rittenhouse is also high up there. Both are by no means sweet, and with the 100 proof of the Rittenhouse, it's perfect for cocktails, whereas a lower percentage and lower proof rye, such as Pikesville, while quite unobjectionable, doesn't stand out the same way. 

 

Bourbons such as Maker's Mark, as Rafa and others have said elsewhere, are heavy on the wheat for the remaining 49%. These tend towards being too sweet for my tastes. My go-to Bourbon, though, Wild Turkey 101, is as I understand it, heavy on the rye for its 49% and comes off far less sweet, and more bracing than most bourbons. Just like Rittenhouse, that quality plus its proof make it a great cocktail spirit.

 

As for tannic qualities, if I'm not mistaken that's just a function of time in the barrel, as tannins are released from oak. So theoretically, bourbon and rye should have the same amount of tannins given the same age and same type of barrel. That said, though, there is a somewhat astringent quality in the high-rye mashbill spirits, but this is why rye is so favored among cocktail enthusiasts (at least those who dislike sweet drinks!)

 

Finally, Canadian whisky has nothing to do with real rye and you should not confuse the two.



#45 Adam George

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:50 AM

Unless it's Whistlepig, which is real rye.  Confusing, huh?


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#46 tanstaafl2

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 11:04 AM

 

 

 

Trinidad Sour sounds like something I would really like.  Alas, no rye in house, though my local store has a rather nice assortment of brands and bottles.  Not sure if my next paycheck will cover it.  I'd really like to try a bottle of rye to see if I like it.

 

Tonight I'm on my second daiquiri -- of a day that featured lying in the road, in ice water, in the cold rain.  Somewhat glad to be alive however.

 

What I have just noticed, getting back to the topic at hand, is that when I say a drink tastes weak, what I really mean is that the drink tastes low in citrus.  My drinks are certainly never weak in alcohol.  I have not found a mixed drink without lime or lemon, or other acidic fruit that I enjoy.  More the better.  Is this normal?

 

Got a rye-heavy bourbon? I've done it with both Rittenhouse 100 and Wild Turkey 101 and it comes out great both ways.

 

I have no bourbon either.  I have tasted bourbon, years ago, and I remember that I liked it.  I've read the entire eG thread on rye but still have no firm idea of what it tastes like.  I feel like such a virgin.  One thing I do not like (with all apologies to Canadians) is Canadian blended whiskey.  If rye tastes like blended whiskey I will pass.

 

Is tannic a taste in rye?  If so, are some brands of rye less tannic than others?  As I said I have a lot of local rye choices, including Rittenhouse 100.  Less tannic the better as far as I am concerned.

 

Nothing new to contribute to the thread tonight.  I'm on my second cup of "whiskey" punch made with Black Barrel rum.  I can't believe I made it thtough the bottle.  It may be my last whiskey punch till I find a replacement.  Which won't be till payday.  The recipe does call for rye.

 

 

Rye is much closer to bourbon than to Canadian blended whisky, or anything else. Its flavor is generally dryer than bourbon, with less corn sweetness, and more mouth-tingling spice, notably hot cinnamon and white pepper. Brands with a lot of rye grain in the mashbill (Bulleit, Templeton, Dickel rye) can have mint and evergreen flavors as well. If you've liked bourbon in the past then give rye a shot; order some Rittenhouse or Bulleit at a bar.

 

Rafa hit the nail so squarely on the head I'm not sure what else I can say, but here's my attempt:

 

I prefer rye to bourbon because of the so-described dryness. Granted, this varies in ryes and varies in bourbons, depending on how much rye/corn/wheat is involved.

 

Bourbon must be min. 51% corn, rye must be min 51% rye. What makes up that remaining 49% is open to the distiller. The higher the rye content (for either whisky), the spicier and less sweet it will be.  For example, Bulleit Rye is 95% rye. I believe Rittenhouse is also high up there. Both are by no means sweet, and with the 100 proof of the Rittenhouse, it's perfect for cocktails, whereas a lower percentage and lower proof rye, such as Pikesville, while quite unobjectionable, doesn't stand out the same way. 

 

Bourbons such as Maker's Mark, as Rafa and others have said elsewhere, are heavy on the wheat for the remaining 49%. These tend towards being too sweet for my tastes. My go-to Bourbon, though, Wild Turkey 101, is as I understand it, heavy on the rye for its 49% and comes off far less sweet, and more bracing than most bourbons. Just like Rittenhouse, that quality plus its proof make it a great cocktail spirit.

 

As for tannic qualities, if I'm not mistaken that's just a function of time in the barrel, as tannins are released from oak. So theoretically, bourbon and rye should have the same amount of tannins given the same age and same type of barrel. That said, though, there is a somewhat astringent quality in the high-rye mashbill spirits, but this is why rye is so favored among cocktail enthusiasts (at least those who dislike sweet drinks!)

 

Finally, Canadian whisky has nothing to do with real rye and you should not confuse the two.

 

My two cents. Typical Canadian whiskey is in no way similar to a true rye as noted. It often has less rye than some straight bourbons. Long story on why it got that association that I can't type here! That said, many of the most interesting rye whiskey of late is coming from Canada. Whistlepig, Mastersons, Jefferson, Lock Stock and Barrel. It is all 100% rye from Canada.There is a reason for that too. I will try to find some links when I get time if anyone is interested in all the dry historical stuff! 

 

Bulleit, Templeton and Dickel are all 95% ryes from LDI/MGP. The mintiness of those ryes (to me) is a distillery characteristic of LDI/MGP (Which interestingly has been undergoing some turmoil of late!).

 

Rittenhouse (a Heaven Hill product, now made at Heaven Hill but used to be made at Brown Forman) is a "Barely Rye" rye (meaning it is 51% rye or maybe a tad more. Much more like bourbon than the higher ryes noted previously. That said it is an excellent introductory rye and as noted great in cocktails.

 

Wild Turkey 101 (which has just recently been reintroduced) is also a lower rye content rye, closer to Rittenhouse. But it is perfectly nice as well. The WT Rye 81 proof is not so good. YMMV!

 

Tannins are indeed a function in part of barrel aging and the degree of temperature fluctuation a barrel is subjected to, probably among many other things (barrel entry proof for example) about which I am no expert, and rye does not necessarily have more than a similarly aged bourbon.

 

Wild Turkey bourbon is not particularly high in rye content. thought to be around 13%. Most major brands of bourbon are around this level. Some of the highest rye content among readily available bourbon are the Four Roses bourbons that use the "B" mashbill (OBSV is 35% rye as compared to OESV for example which is 20%). Bulleit bourbon also comes from Four Roses at present (only the Bulleit Rye comes from LDI/MGP) and has a fairly high rye mashbill.


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#47 Hassouni

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 11:18 AM

Hm, was unaware that WT101 had such a low rye content.  Be that as it may, JoNorvelleWalker, I find it FAR less cloying than most other bourbons I've had.



#48 EvergreenDan

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 03:11 PM

 I am now intrigued to try Dan's version with Campari and Ramazzotti.

Just to be clear, I didn't create the version with Campari and Ramazzotti. I got it from someone on chwhnd. This is indeed my favorite variation.

 

And -- this is embarrassing -- Toby Maloney probably created the Campari / Nonino version, and perhaps intentionally  (or unintentionally) changed the name to Airplane. The Ramazzotti variation is either Plane nor Airplane.

 

If made with Gran Classico and Amaro CioCiaro (my invention), I call it a Balsa Airplane and is also excellent.


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#49 Rafa

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:50 PM

Hassouni—I'm not sure whether you've tried it yet, but Old Grand Dad 114 sounds like it'd be right up your alley. High proof, high rye, with all the spice and kick you could want. A worthy upgrade to WT101,* both stronger and more refined, and I say that as a big fan of the turkey. I prefer OGD to most ryes I've tried, especially for sipping.

*Before tanstaafl2 objects/interjects, let me state that I know that OGD isn't a Turkey product, but a Beam-owned (or I suppose soon to be Suntory-owned) brand with a unique yeast and mashbill shared only with the (inferior imo) Basil Hayden.

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#50 campus five

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 10:56 PM

I got a bottle of Zucca probably 16 months ago, but I never really new what to do with it.
But, I recently dropped by a new branch of small chain-let called Settebello, which has certified authentic Neapolitan pizza.
Unlike the other branch I'd been to (Pasadena, Ca), this one (Marina del Rey, CA)had a proper cocktail program by Proprietors LLC, aka Alex Day and Dave Kaplan. Not only was the cocktail really standout, but I finally gave me something to use Zucca in.

Manhattan Beach (clever if only because the city of Manhattan Beach is a couple towns over from Marina Del Rey)
2 oz Bourbon
0.5 oz Cocchi Vermouth di Torrino
0.5 oz Zucca
stir, strain, coupe, orange peel
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#51 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:34 AM

A Negroni and then a Rob Roy using Glenfarclas 15 and Punt e Mes.


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#52 sbumgarner

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:03 AM

Just to be clear, I didn't create the version with Campari and Ramazzotti. I got it from someone on chwhnd. This is indeed my favorite variation.

 

 

Gave this a whirl last night, very good indeed. I could see myself preferring this version in colder months and the original for warmer ones.



#53 Hassouni

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:24 AM

Hassouni—I'm not sure whether you've tried it yet, but Old Grand Dad 114 sounds like it'd be right up your alley. High proof, high rye, with all the spice and kick you could want. A worthy upgrade to WT101,* both stronger and more refined, and I say that as a big fan of the turkey. I prefer OGD to most ryes I've tried, especially for sipping.

*Before tanstaafl2 objects/interjects, let me state that I know that OGD isn't a Turkey product, but a Beam-owned (or I suppose soon to be Suntory-owned) brand with a unique yeast and mashbill shared only with the (inferior imo) Basil Hayden.

 

Will keep that in mind, thanks



#54 tanstaafl2

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:28 AM

Hassouni—I'm not sure whether you've tried it yet, but Old Grand Dad 114 sounds like it'd be right up your alley. High proof, high rye, with all the spice and kick you could want. A worthy upgrade to WT101,* both stronger and more refined, and I say that as a big fan of the turkey. I prefer OGD to most ryes I've tried, especially for sipping.

*Before tanstaafl2 objects/interjects, let me state that I know that OGD isn't a Turkey product, but a Beam-owned (or I suppose soon to be Suntory-owned) brand with a unique yeast and mashbill shared only with the (inferior imo) Basil Hayden.

 

No objection here! I will interject only to say I completely agree with you! OGD is an excellent alternative with a higher rye mashbill, thought to be about 27% rye and comes in three proofs, 114, 100 BIB and 80 (which was recently lowered from 86 with little fanfare).

 

OGD is about the only mashbill that was not changed by Beam to their usual mashbill with a different name slapped on it when they acquired it. They continue to use the same mashbill as it used when it came over from National Distillers (thankfully!) including a different yeast than other Beam products. Basil Hayden is the same mashbill as OGD only lower proof and higher cost. Go figure.

 

OGD is indeed a bargain that one can only hope won't change much, Suntory or no Suntory. High proof good quality whiskey aged maybe 7-8 years (hard to know these days for sure since it is no longer age stated) that sells for a relative pittance these days.

 

How long can this last in a world of whiskey shortages??? Along with other bargains like EC12 and Weller 12 one wonders if it may be the last of a dying breed.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

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~tanstaafl2

#55 Rafa

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 09:05 AM

I suspect so, though when the price hikes come, we can hardly blame Suntory. These bourbons are frankly underpriced. We're due for price increases across the board, and it's frankly surprising that an effectively barrel proof Old Grand Dad and 12 year old baby Pappy are still the bargains they are.

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#56 EvergreenDan

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 11:09 AM

"Pappy" and "bargain" are matter/anti-matter. They annihilate each other, releasing massive amounts of energy drunkenness.


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Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

#57 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 01:36 AM

A Last Word using clear bottle Bols Genever. Rocking.

 

And now, because I couldn't quite decide what to make, a Dark n Stormy using Gingerbeard and aged Cruzan.

 

And, lastly, a peaty Roy made with Ardbeg Uigeadail. A monster. The big Japanese kind that comes out of some radioactive cave, all bombarded by atomic bombs and woe, that attacks a fishing boat in the first scene and then fucks up a whole city.

 

Given I've been matching booze with songs lately, let's pair that one with the Gamera song from the movie in which a couple of kids wind up on a space ship and go to a strange planet and Gamera defends them from an alien beast. A Rob Roy with a barbaric Islay as opposed to a Speyside or Highland is something else, hey? I mean, compare a Blood and Sand made with a boring blend and one made with something like Talisker. 

 


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 15 January 2014 - 03:33 AM.

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#58 mkayahara

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 06:49 PM

Still playing around with sherry, and with a bottle of Lustau manzanilla open, I opted tonight for the Choke Artist from Art of the Bar. Maybe it's just me, but I think this is one of the perfect drinks. The synergy that exists between sherry and Cynar always blows my mind.


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Matthew Kayahara
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#59 lesliec

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 07:29 PM

Tammany Hall last night, with sort-of Scotch (essence in home-made vodka - surprisingly convincing, actually), Ketel1 Genever, Punt e Mes, Benedictine and Angostura.

 

Very tasty.  Another winner - thanks, Rafa.


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Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
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#60 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 09:26 PM

For a change I'm enjoying a daiquiri made with Clement VSOP.  (Also because I'm about out of Busted Barrel.)  The Clement works tonight.

 

I appreciate the rye related responses.  I was hoping to get to the store today to window shop, but I didn't make it.  And what fun is window shopping?  Any opinions on Knob Creek?


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