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Recipe challenge 2010


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#1 Anna N

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 01:47 PM

So who’s in?
Here’s the proposal:

We all have a list of recipes in our heads, book-marked or written somewhere that we want to try but just never get around to actually making. Choose 5 recipes for any course, any cuisine that you have never attempted before but want to try. Name your 5 recipes with their sources (links where feasible) and then report as and when you actually make the dish(es). No need to do anything complicated unless that’s what you want. Just recipes that you keep meaning to try but can never quite assemble all the ingredients for or can never find the time or occasion to push you to commit. You have a whole year to fit these 5 recipes into your life but if you complete your 5 recipes in the first month of the year then re-commit to 5 more. Let’s have some fun and share successes and failures, some photos if we can and perhaps some recipes (respecting copyright rules, of course). You can double your money by using some or all of the ingredients you might have listed in this topic.

Here’s my list:

Lamb with Apple from Paula Wolfert’s The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean
French Bread (Baguettes) from Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice
Javanese Grilled Chicken from James Oseland’s Cradle of Flavor
Chicken Fricasse with Artichokes and Mushrooms from Molly Steven’s All About Braising
TBA from Thomas Keller’s Ad Hoc at Home
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#2 dividend

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 04:36 PM

I'll bite on this one.

Zuni chicken and bread salad
Bourdain's french onion soup from Les Halles, including the beef stock, and I have half a mind to buy some rustic glazed soup crocks the next time Mom and I hit a local craft fair
Bacon from Charcuterie
Hollandaise. I don't have a specific recipe, but I feel like this is something I should know how to make
Sugar cookie dough. I KNOW there's something better out their than the rolls of Pillsbury. While this is another one without a specific recipe, there is a very specific vision in my mind involving pretty piped icing made according to the mother of an XBF, which I have not yet gotten around to trying.

Those are general. I also have a very specific set of things to try involving hosting my first Thanksgiving in 2010. Including butternut squash ravioli (Mario Battali's recipe), and recreating an oyster stuffing recipe from my Dad's childhood. Do those count?
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#3 mkayahara

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 05:14 PM

This is a fun topic, but what makes it especially great is that I've already accomplished it! I've been on a big Japanese cooking kick this past week, and have taken the opportunity to make several dishes I had never made before: okonomiyaki, chawan-mushi, mochi, kouhaku namasu and, tonight, yaki-udon. I guess this means I should make a list of the next five dishes I need to finally get around to making...
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#4 Kerry Beal

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 06:55 PM

Ok, I'm in.

Bienenstich cake
Inverted puff pastry
make a satisfactory chocolate fudge - no tooth achingly sweet
crumpets
Andi's crystallized ginger

#5 Emily_R

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 06:57 PM

Just wanted to chime in to post about something I've been doing for the past two years, that has really enriched my cooking... Figured I'd post it here just in case it might inspire others on the forum. For 2008, 2009, (and now 2010), I made a resolution to try one new-to-me recipe every week. Didn't have to be a big fancy recipe -- even a new recipe for hot chocolate mix would work... And not to say I was perfect, and there weren't times I went 10 days or even 2 weeks... But as a result of this commitment, I tried 86 new recipes in 2009! Its just been fantastic -- has brought so many new favorite recipes to my repertoire, and helped me at least keep pace with the huge stack of new recipes I'm constantly printing off the web...

#6 stuartlikesstrudel

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 09:10 PM

This is a great idea Anna, it will be interesting to see peoples' progress as the year gets going.

For me, I think top of the list is Pierre Herme's Vanilla Tart. I love vanilla. I haven't done any entrements of this complexity before so i think the multi-step process will be tricky, long, but satisfying.

Then I want to make a good baguette (not sure which recipe yet)

and I've had this Dulce le Leche pie from Gfron1 in my bookmarks for a long time, just waiting for the right time...

On the savoury front, I want to work with pasta more... I have technically made ravioli before but they left a lot to be desired so I will work on that, probably a pumpkin ravioli using amaretti biscuits which I have read about somewhere here in eG.

Lastly, dipping back into sweets again, the Genin caramels from this thread seem to have such rave reviews that I think I have to try making them... I haven't tasted the real ones (or ANY gourmet caramels I think) but I do love caramel so I think i will enjoy them.

#7 Marmish

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 09:42 PM

Hmm. I'll have to think about my 5 to post, but I always have a running list of things. My problem is I see something, want to make it, even get some key ingredient, then can't remember where I saw it. Or I get a new magazine or cookbook and mark some things, but then set it aside and never get to making them. I started keeping a paper list of recipe title and source, and I recently moved it to google documents so I can pull it up at work and stop at the grocery on the way home if needed. And I won't lose it on the mess I call a desk. We'll see if it helps. If it's a keeper, I'll move it to a second google doc of things to make again.

#8 lesliec

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 10:04 PM

Here's another variant eGulleters may like to try:

My wife and I have a loose agreement with another couple that, when one couple invites the other for dinner, the host/ess will include at least one thing on the menu they've never attempted before. We originally started this to level the playing field - I was starting to overwhelm them with my forays into Adria, Blumenthal et al (I was doing it because I wanted to try the food - it was never intended to be a competition). This way, each of us has an equal chance of stunning success :laugh: or total failure :sad:.

Thus far, not too many of the latter. But there's always a lot of new recipes out there ...

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#9 Tri2Cook

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 10:05 PM

I'll jump on this one... but I'm not sure which recipes I want to commit to yet.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#10 Pierogi

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 11:57 PM

FABULOUS topic, Anna !

I want to play, I just need to put the old thinking cap on about my first 5...

Off the top of my tired head, I'd say

1) make brioche from scratch
2) roast a duck (or parts thereof....)
3) make Middle Eastern preserved lemons (this has been limited by storage and amount, I usually cook for just me. But a friend gave me Judith Jones' cooking for one cookbook for Christmas, and she gives you proportions and techinque for just 4 lemons, works for me)

Numbers 4 & 5 to come later. Can't wait to see what others post !
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#11 Anna N

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 01:24 AM

Glad to see we have a few takers and that we have managed to capture the interest of some of our bakers and candy makers! I have the baguette's pate fermentee resting in the fridge and hope to make the bread later today if life cooperates.
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#12 KateinChicago

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 08:27 AM

Several things that I would like to make but am unhappy with the recipes.

Stuffed Grape Leaves. I've done the research, made a few batches and am still not happy with the results. I am thinking these might be better to buy from the few restaurants and manufacturers (like Divina) that I like.

Lespinasse braised beef short ribs. I purchased the cook book "The Elements of Taste" just so that I could taste this heaven on a plate again but it was a non starter. Not bad just not the ethereal creation from the former restaurant at the St. Regis Hotel in Manhattan. Chef Gray Kunz knew that this was the reason many would buy his cookbook but the recipe he offered was sadly inferior to what the restaurant offered, at least to me, over several years of eating.

Perfect Tarte Tatin. I made Thomas Keller's recipe and it pretty much didn't do well even though most of his recipes are spot on for me. I made Tarte Tatin from an old French cookbook (my first attempt at puff pastry dough) that seemed terrific but I know that there are better versions out there.

Perfect Cassoulet. I have made elements of cassoulet but never the whole beast. I have made the duck leg confit (Thomas Keller's recipe) and the sausage which I think are wonderful but I have yet to make cassoulet from start to finish by my self. My teamed efforts required pulling out the lamb and pork roast (my friend made them and when I tasted them they were NOT good) as both were dry and unflavorable. Both cooks agreed that these meats had to go. My next effort will be a sausage, duck confit and bean mixture but I wish that I had a great recipe for this!

Meatloaf. I never, ever liked meatloaf but my SO does. I have been making a version that both of us can digest(barely)but lately it seems further and farther removed from his meatloaf dream and mine (my meatloaf dreams do not exist). Is there one that will make us both happy? His dream includes canned (argh) mushrooms, ballpark mustard, ketchup. My (better) sollutions include fresh sauteed (Crimini) mushrooms, Dijon mustard and Heinz Chile Sauce. I use a mix of ground pork, beef and veal plus milk soaked bread crumbs plus sauteed onions and garlic. If I have on hand I add parsely and other herbs. There must be a better version of this dish that doesn't require a PHD in everyday guy stuff. I want to make him happy but once a week is too much for this.

Kate

#13 Canned Tuna

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 08:49 AM

My one and only challenge is a whole hog. I was originally going to spit roast one on a propane roaster I have. Then I decided I would like to pit roast it. Digging a big hole in the yaerd, the wood, the rocks and all.

#14 Rico

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 08:59 AM

Sweet. Like putting your goals down on paper ... except in front of an audience full of intimidatingly good cooks ...

I don't really have recipes, but off the cuff I'll go with:

Pie: cherry, apple or blueberry. And making my own crust for it, of course. I'm not much of a dessert guy, but I feel as if that's something so basic that I need to know it. I know what you're thinking: "He's never made a pie??" - I can see the judgement in the eyes of your avatars. It's withering.

Duck confit: because it's also one of those things I feel like I should know how to do.

A newer, better chili: I'm tired of being out-chili-ed by Wick Fowler and his pre-packaged stuff.

Anything rabbit: Primarily for the novelty to me. I'll probably take whatever recipe I use from Mastering the Art of French Cooking (is there a commonly used acronym for that? It's a long title).

A whole hog on a spit: Who doesn't want to do that? And I now have a backyard in which to do it.

#15 abooja

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 09:03 AM

I finally made sausages this year -- on Christmas day, in fact -- but I'd like to try different varieties, including andouille. That will be cool (hot?), because I'll get to use the grinder, the sausage stuffer, and the smoker for one dish.

Speaking of smoking, I'd like to try to make my own pastrami this year. Not that I even like pastrami (I don't love it), but DH does, and we only ever get the good stuff when we drive into Philly or back to NYC.

To go with the pastrami, I'd like to bake a great loaf of rye bread. I've made rye bread before, and I have included rye flour in certain bread recipes, but it was never anything outstanding. The combination of good, homemade pastrami and rye would certainly give me bragging rights in this household.

Like KateinChigago, I'd also like to try my hand at cassoulet. Ever since DH "lost" his bean allergy, I've been forcing one bean recipe after another on him. Cassoulet seems like the most complicated bean dish I can come up with. I've already made my own duck confit, sausages, and often cook beans from scratch, so this seems like the next logical step.

Last but not least, I'd like to try my hand at Pierre Herme's macarons, once and for all. I've purchased the various nut flours and I have repeatedly saved/aged the egg whites from ice cream making, but never took the final plunge. This is my year.

#16 mig

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 10:42 AM

1. yeasted cinnamon buns - no recipe yet, but i have to learn so i can stop the yearly plague of Pillsbury on Christmas morning.

2. madeleines

3. Pierre Herme's lemon tart, via Dorie Greenspan:

http://www.seriousea...eam-recipe.html

4. moujadara - that Middle Eastern rice/lentil topped with caramelized onions dish - I adore it. It seems simple, but I lack context in the regional culinary vernacular. Attempts thus far have not satisfied.

http://www.herbivora...e-mujadara.html

5. Gramercy Tavern's tremendous strawberry pie. Strawberries are my favorite fruit, and this pie, which I tasted last June, overwhelmed me. There were both preserved and fresh strawberries in it, for maximum berry punch:

http://www.yelp.com/...EBGecBvfj5gZP1Q

Edited by mig, 07 January 2010 - 10:43 AM.


#17 ncorrigbl

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 02:34 PM

I tried about six different yeasted cinnamon roll recipes and this one is the one now I use every Christmas morning!
I fill them with my own combination of brown sugar, cinnamon, honey, and raisins. YUM!


Granny Foster's Refrigerator Rolls

1/2 cup warm water (105 degrees F to 115 degrees F)

1 (1/4-ounce) package dry yeast

1 tablespoon sugar

2 cups milk

11 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more for baking sheet

1 teaspoon salt

6 to 6 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for kneading

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

If you are using this dough to make either the sticky orange-coconut pinwheels or the killer pecan sticky buns, proceed directly to those recipes after Note.



Combine the water, yeast, and 1 teaspoon of the sugar in a small bowl; stir to combine. Let stand in a warm place until small bubbles form on the surface, about 5 minutes.



Meanwhile, heat the milk, 8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, salt, and remaining 2 teaspoons sugar in a small saucepan over very low heat. Cook, stirring constantly, until sugar has dissolved and the butter has melted. Be sure not to let the mixture become hotter than 115 degrees F, or it will kill the yeast. Remove from heat, and pour into a large bowl; add the yeast mixture. Stir until combined. Add 6 cups flour, and stir until the mixture forms a soft dough. It may be necessary to add the remaining 1/2 cup flour. Transfer mixture to a lightly floured work surface, and knead until the dough is smooth, 5 to 8 minutes.



Lightly oil a large bowl, and place dough in bowl. Cover, and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, 30 to 45 minutes. At this point, dough may be stored, tightly covered, in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Allow dough to reach room temperature before proceeding with the recipe.



Punch dough down, and divide equally in half. Place on a clean work surface, and cover loosely with a kitchen towel or inverted bowl. Let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Note: If you are using this dough to make either the sticky orange-coconut pinwheels or the killer pecan sticky buns, proceed to one of the following recipes.



Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly butter a baking sheet; set aside. Melt remaining 3 tablespoons butter; set aside.



Working with 1 piece of dough at a time, roll out on a lightly floured work surface until 3/4-inch thick. Using a 2 1/2-inch biscuit cutter, cut out about 2 dozen rolls. Place rolls on prepared baking sheet, and let rise until rolls have doubled in size, 15 to 20 minutes. Brush tops lightly with melted butter. Repeat with remaining dough.



Bake until golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes. Serve immediately.
Killer Pecan Sticky Buns:

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened

3/4 cup raisins

1/2 cup bourbon

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 1/4 cups firmly packed light-brown sugar

1/2 cup honey

1/2 cup chopped pecans

1/2 recipe Granny Foster's Refrigerator Roll Dough (recipe above), prepared through Note"





Butter a 9-inch round glass baking dish with 2 tablespoons butter; set aside.



In a small bowl, combine raisins and bourbon, and let soak until plumped, about 20 minutes.



In a second small bowl, combine cinnamon, 1/2 cup brown sugar, and remaining 6 tablespoons butter; set aside.



In a third small bowl, combine remaining 3/4 cup brown sugar, honey, and pecans. Spread mixture evenly in prepared baking dish; set aside.



Roll dough into a 12 inch by 6-inch rectangle about 1/4-inch thick. Spread the brown sugar and butter mixture evenly over dough, leaving a 1-inch border. Drain raisins, and sprinkle over brown-sugar mixture. Beginning with the long side of the dough, roll into a log. Place the log, seam side down, on a clean work surface. Using a sharp knife, cut the log crosswise into 1-inch-thick slices. Transfer slices, cut side down, to prepared baking dish (the slices should fit snugly). Set aside in a warm place, and allow to rise until slightly puffy, 20 to 30 minutes.



Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place baking dish on a baking sheet with sides and bake until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean and the buns are golden brown, 45 to 50 minutes.



Let cool for 5 minutes. While still warm, place a plate over baking dish. Invert baking dish to unmold. Serve warm or at room temperature.



Yield: 12 buns



Sticky Orange Coconut Pinwheels:

1 tablespoon unsalted melted butter, plus more for baking dish

1/2 cup sugar

1/4 cup flaked sweetened coconut

1 orange, zested

1/4 recipe Granny Foster's Refrigerator Roll Dough (recipe above), prepared through Step 5

Glaze, recipe follows



Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly butter a 9-inch round glass baking dish; set aside.



In a small bowl, combine the sugar, coconut, and orange zest; set aside.



Using a rolling pin, roll dough into a 12-inch round, about 1/4-inch thick. Brush with melted butter; set aside. Sprinkle sugar mixture evenly over dough. Cut into 12 equal pie-shaped wedges. Roll up wedges, beginning at the wide end. Arrange wedges in a pinwheel pattern in prepared baking dish. Cover with a clean kitchen towel, and let rise until doubled in size, about 30 minutes.



Bake until golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Drizzle glaze over pinwheels.



Yield: 1 (9-inch) cake



Glaze:

1/4 cup sugar

1/4 cup sour cream

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice

2 tablespoons unsalted butter



In a medium saucepan, combine all ingredients. Cook, stirring constantly, over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Increase the heat to high, and bring mixture to a boil. Cook, stirring constantly, for 3 minutes more.

#18 Lapin d'Argent

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 05:01 PM

Anna, thanks so much for this topic! And thanks everyone so far for such inspiring lists.

Here's mine:

1. Bacon. Time to stop lurking on that Charcuterie thread and finally cure and smoke me a belly.

2. Duck confit. What's not to love?

3. Souffle. Never made one in my life, sweet or savory. Really, how hard can it be?

4. Ravioli. I've made my own pasta, but never my own ravioli. High time.

5. ??? Not sure what the final item is to be yet; perhaps someone else will remind me!

#19 Marlene

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 05:36 PM

Anna, thanks so much for this topic! And thanks everyone so far for such inspiring lists.

Here's mine:

1. Bacon. Time to stop lurking on that Charcuterie thread and finally cure and smoke me a belly.

2. Duck confit. What's not to love?

3. Souffle. Never made one in my life, sweet or savory. Really, how hard can it be?

4. Ravioli. I've made my own pasta, but never my own ravioli. High time.

5. ??? Not sure what the final item is to be yet; perhaps someone else will remind me!


I did cheese souffles the other day. Easy easy! I swear. And doing bacon is so much fun. Have fun with these!
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#20 Marmish

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 06:44 PM

FABULOUS topic, Anna !

I want to play, I just need to put the old thinking cap on about my first 5...

Off the top of my tired head, I'd say

1) make brioche from scratch
2) roast a duck (or parts thereof....)
3) make Middle Eastern preserved lemons (this has been limited by storage and amount, I usually cook for just me. But a friend gave me Judith Jones' cooking for one cookbook for Christmas, and she gives you proportions and techinque for just 4 lemons, works for me)

Numbers 4 & 5 to come later. Can't wait to see what others post !


I'll have to look for that book. I'd love to try those preserved lemons. This past year I made brioche from both the Artisan Bread in 5 minutes a Day and Baking From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan. The 5 Min. one was really good. It was good on its own and made fantastic french toast. I knew Dorie's more traditional recipe would be better, but it was phenomenal and because the Kitchenaid did the work, took only a bit more time and not much more work at all.

#21 heidih

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 08:19 PM

I am not ready with my list yet, but I see a few posts above about preserved lemons. Here is a link to a great eGullet topic on the subject.

#22 Pierogi

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 09:50 PM

.....
3. Souffle. Never made one in my life, sweet or savory. Really, how hard can it be?
.....


Lapin d'A.....OUTSTANDING suggestion. There's my #4. Every time I see a recipe for a souffle, I think "I should make one of these sometime..." Thank you.


3) make Middle Eastern preserved lemons (this has been limited by storage and amount, I usually cook for just me. But a friend gave me Judith Jones' cooking for one cookbook for Christmas, and she gives you proportions and techinque for just 4 lemons, works for me)


I'll have to look for that book. I'd love to try those preserved lemons. This past year I made brioche from both the Artisan Bread in 5 minutes a Day and Baking From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan. The 5 Min. one was really good. It was good on its own and made fantastic french toast. I knew Dorie's more traditional recipe would be better, but it was phenomenal and because the Kitchenaid did the work, took only a bit more time and not much more work at all.

The title is "The Pleasures of Cooking For One". I haven't had a chance to really peruse it thoroughly yet, since I also got John Besh's "My New Orleans" and THAT puppy is massive. Scanning Judith's table of contents, though, was very pleased.

For those of you who aren't familiar with the name, Judith Jones was the editor at Knopf for BOTH Julia Child and James Beard. Now that is some serious culinary cred !
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#23 djyee100

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 10:49 PM

A great idea for a thread, Anna. Many recipes that I want to cook, and they have been lying around my house, sometimes for years. For this challenge I'll cook (1) a menu of Northern Indian food from chef Ruta Kahate, with a main dish of prawns in makhani sauce (curried butter & cream sauce); (2) a menu of Southern Indian food, also from Ruta Kahate, with a main of shrimp cakes with sambar masala; (3) poached halibut with clams and chives, a recipe from James Peterson; (4) bourride, also from James Peterson; (5) Spanish pizza (Coca) with saffron roasted potatoes and romesco sauce, a recipe from chef Mary Karlin.

#24 Anna N

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 01:47 AM

. . . .

Here’s my list:

Lamb with Apple from Paula Wolfert’s The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean
French Bread (Baguettes) from Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice
Javanese Grilled Chicken from James Oseland’s Cradle of Flavor
Chicken Fricasse with Artichokes and Mushrooms from Molly Steven’s All About Braising
TBA from Thomas Keller’s Ad Hoc at Home


French Bread (Baguettes) from Peter Reinhart’s The Bread Baker’s Apprentice

So I made the pate fermentee and let it rest overnight in the fridge. In the morning I carefully weighed out the dough ingredients and added these along with the pate fermentee (cut into about 10 pieces) to my stand mixer with the paddle attachment. This is where things started to go wrong! I turned the mixer on to its lowest speed and was instantly hit with a shower of damp flour, salt, and yeast! It sprayed over me, the kitchen walls, the mixer and the clean dishes draining near by. So much for my careful measurements using a digital scale! But I soldiered on. I added a little more water to make up for the stuff that me and my kitchen were wearing but made no attempt to guess how much yeast, salt or flour was now decorating me and my kitchen. I mixed it using a wooden spoon for a minute or so before putting it back in the Kitchen Aid. No showers this time. I kneaded for the 6 minutes suggested but the dough was still sticky rather than tacky so I added a smidge more flour and kneaded for another minute. (I learned from a source I can’t remember that the difference between sticky and tacky is that sticky leaves dough on your fingers while tacky only tries to.) It just barely passed the window-pane test. I then put the dough in an oiled and covered container for its room temperature proof.
From then on my day lurched from mini-crisis to mini-crisis and in the end the best I could do was quickly form a couple of batards and bake them off. The bread was attractive to look at and the crust was nice and crispy but the crumb was not there. So today it’s back to the beginning. I will make another batch of pate fermentee and try again.

Edited by Anna N, 08 January 2010 - 01:51 AM.

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#25 Prawncrackers

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 04:45 AM

1.Curry
2.Curry
3.Curry
4.Curry
5.Curry!

In particular Indian subcontinent curries. Thai and other SE Asian curries in the main I can make at home better than I can eat out. But I've been putting off teaching myself all those wonderful Indian curries for so many years. In my whole entire life I've only made two, a murgh makhani and a duck madras about 5 years ago, both were disppointing. It's not like I can't get the ingredients either, I can and in abundance, Birmingham having an enormous Asian population and being as you all know the curry capital of the Western world.

This is the year, mark my words.

#26 Anna N

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 05:16 AM

1.Curry
2.Curry
3.Curry
4.Curry
5.Curry!

In particular Indian subcontinent curries. Thai and other SE Asian curries in the main I can make at home better than I can eat out. But I've been putting off teaching myself all those wonderful Indian curries for so many years. In my whole entire life I've only made two, a murgh makhani and a duck madras about 5 years ago, both were disppointing. It's not like I can't get the ingredients either, I can and in abundance, Birmingham having an enormous Asian population and being as you all know the curry capital of the Western world.

This is the year, mark my words.


We are marking your words and holding your feet to the fire! :biggrin: Good luck - bet you it will be worth it. I just made butter - OK so it's not on my list and it's no biggie but it's one of those things that have been niggling at me for years. However bad the day gets (and it can get pretty bad around here) I know I can mark up one small accomplishment.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#27 robirdstx

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 08:41 AM

Anna N - I found this on Peter Reinhart's Weblog:
"...Another recipe with errors is the classic baguette dough (French Bread). The water should be 16 ounces (453 gr.), salt 14 gr. yeast 7 gr., and flour 680 gr.). Mea culpa!..."
I don't know if he is referring to the version in your book or not but thought I would pass this along.

#28 OliverB

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 10:12 AM

I only have one thing I've been meaning to make (and bought the ingredients twice already for), the fried chicken from Ad Hoc at Home.

But this idea falls into my goal for this year: a threesome each month.
Meaning, picking any of my 200+ cookbooks and committing to making (at least) 3 recipes from that book in one month. That way actually using the books for more than reading pleasure. I might open the book at random and make what ever is on that page or I might select 3 things in particular, not sure yet.

First book is Ad Hoc at home of course, then probably Mastering the Art of Chinese Cooking. We'll see how it goes...
"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"
- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

#29 Anna N

Anna N
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Posted 08 January 2010 - 11:12 AM

Anna N - I found this on Peter Reinhart's Weblog:
"...Another recipe with errors is the classic baguette dough (French Bread). The water should be 16 ounces (453 gr.), salt 14 gr. yeast 7 gr., and flour 680 gr.). Mea culpa!..."
I don't know if he is referring to the version in your book or not but thought I would pass this along.

Thanks very much for this but I don't believe it is related to the recipe I am using which is from BBA (Bread Baker's Apprentice). The recipe I am using calls for exactly the same ingredients in the same percentages for the pate fermentee and the dough.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#30 LizD518

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 11:52 AM

I love all of the responses to this topic.

Since I am starting the South Beach Diet on Monday, I guess the thought of perfecting my pasta and bread skills is pretty much out. But I've decided to approach this diet not as a ban on foods I love to eat (bread, pasta, ice cream) but as an opportunity to perfect my skills on new items - like not being so afraid to cook fish, and to take advantage of the lovely books by Eric Ripert, Thomas Keller and event Alinea that are sitting on my bookshelves. So here is my list:


1. Something from Eric Ripert "A Return To Cooking"

2. Something from the Alinea cookbok

3. Something from "The French Laundry At Home"

4. A souffle - I'm allowed all the eggs I want!

5. And because what is life with a little indulgence - Macrons! I've tried them a couple of times, and I have a long way to go!