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Sommaq, Sumac, Sumak


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122 replies to this topic

#31 nessa

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Posted 28 March 2004 - 08:21 PM

Question about dried sumac: When mixed with yogurt, will it cause the yogurt to become oh say, vivid pepto-bismol pink?
Did I use too much? Let it sit too long so that the color leached out? Or did my supplier sell me sumac with some kind of dye?
How can I avoid this? Do I need to simply add the sumac later so that there's no time for the red to bleed?
I was marinating some chicken in a yogurt/sumac marinade and my chicken turned this hideous pink. Tasted fine but......
Any insight, suggestions or laughter?


#32 sparrowgrass

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Posted 29 March 2004 - 06:05 AM

Sumac berries are red--sumac-ade is pink.

I have never cooked with the berries, but I can see that they might make your chicken pink.
sparrowgrass

#33 nessa

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Posted 29 March 2004 - 06:22 AM

Oh goodness, Sumac-ade that sound deeeeeeeelish!
I'm going to have to try that!


#34 Adam Balic

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Posted 29 March 2004 - 06:24 AM

I have used the berries in cooking and they haven't resulted in any strange colours. Either it is s difference in the type of sumac or prepartion or the addition of dye in your lot, but why would you add dye?

#35 balmagowry

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Posted 29 March 2004 - 07:58 AM

Thread convergence! In American Indian tradition (sorry, don't know which tribes), sumac is called squaw bush and has all sorts of medicinal properties, as discussed in this thread....

#36 Adam Balic

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Posted 29 March 2004 - 08:07 AM

Squaw berries are sumac? Oh, that explains a lot.

Here is a recipe for Sumac wine.

Sumac wine

#37 nessa

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Posted 29 March 2004 - 08:19 AM

I have used the berries in cooking and they haven't resulted in any strange colours. Either it is s difference in the type of sumac or prepartion or the addition of dye in your lot, but why would you add dye?

I don't know why they would add dye unless they were trying to disguise something that wasnt sumac or that they didnt think was red enough. I don't see that as being likely, its not like sumac is hard to come by etc. I'm thinking this might just be a case of unexpected yet legit results? I put a heaping tablespoon of dried crushed sumac berries into one cup of yogurt and marinated chicken for about 10 hours in it. I can see how color from the berries would leach out, but this was like a magenta/pink/weird. I KNEW I should have taken a picture.
Maybe it just looked weird because it was mixing with the white yogurt.
I think next time I'll just do a sumac rub and forgo the yogurt.


#38 Adam Balic

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Posted 29 March 2004 - 08:26 AM

I can see how color from the berries would leach out, but this was like a magenta/pink/weird.

Nessa - I think that you need to get some professional advise, this magenta/pink/weirdness is obviously spreading. Run, run for you life!

#39 Naftal

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 07:42 AM

Yes...I use it in tahini and hoummus, I know it is good in falafal. But, other than that, how do you use this wonderful seasoning?

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#40 ChefCrash

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 09:46 AM

Hi Naftal

Zaatar is 1 part Thyme, 1 part sesame and a 1/4 part Sumac and salt to taste.

Sumac is used instead of lemon juice in Fattoush.

#41 Alisond

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 10:12 AM

My grandma makes sumac lemonaid. It's a very good beverage.

#42 BonVivant

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 02:43 PM

also works as a tenderiser. add some to a lamb marinade. try it on fish as well but don't leave it in too long.

#43 Shaya

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 04:36 PM

Persian chelo kabob.

#44 SeaGal

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 10:09 AM

I like to sprinkle it on pork chops, lamb and fish before grilling or broiling. I make oven fries with olive oil, garlic, S & P and sumac sprinkled on before roasting in a hot oven. It's also good on salads that have tomatoes, parsley and/or feta cheese in them.
Jan
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#45 boaziko

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 11:07 AM

On slices of (white) raw onion rings.

I use it a lot in salads and grilled meat skewers. (chicken and lamb)
"Eat every meal as if it's your first and last on earth" (Conrad Rosenblatt 1935)

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#46 scubadoo97

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 08:21 AM

I add it to my lahama jeen (sp ?) for a little tartness

#47 RetroDiner

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 09:02 AM

Simplest possible use - sprinkle it on plain white rice when serving. Adds color, flavor, aroma. You'll actually see shakers of sumak on the table at some middle-eastern restaurants.
-Dan

#48 Naftal

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 11:26 AM

Hi Naftal

Zaatar is 1 part Thyme, 1 part sesame and a 1/4 part Sumac and salt to taste.

Sumac is used instead of lemon juice in Fattoush.

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I have always wnted to know the rilght way tomake zaattar, thanks!

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#49 Naftal

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 11:28 AM

On slices of (white)  raw onion rings.

I use it a lot in salads and grilled meat skewers. (chicken and lamb)

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I love the onion idea, what kinds of salads do you make?

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#50 Naftal

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 11:30 AM

My grandma makes sumac lemonaid. It's a very good beverage.

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Does this contain lemon juice? :huh:

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#51 Naftal

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 11:31 AM

Simplest possible use - sprinkle it on plain white rice when serving.  Adds color, flavor, aroma.  You'll actually see shakers of sumak on the table at some middle-eastern restaurants.
-Dan

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Terrific :biggrin: !

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#52 Naftal

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 11:33 AM

also works as a tenderiser.  add some to a lamb marinade.  try it on fish as well but don't leave it in too long.

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Brillint :smile:

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#53 Naftal

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 11:35 AM

Persian chelo kabob.

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Can you tell me how thisis made? :huh:

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#54 Naftal

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Posted 07 May 2007 - 11:38 AM

I add it to my lahama jeen (sp ?) for a little tartness

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I plan to try this :biggrin:

Edited by Naftal, 07 May 2007 - 11:38 AM.

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#55 Naftal

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 08:55 AM

:sad: Any other ideas on waysto use this wonderful :wub: spice?

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#56 melkor

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 08:57 AM

Hi Naftal

Zaatar is 1 part Thyme, 1 part sesame and a 1/4 part Sumac and salt to taste.

Sumac is used instead of lemon juice in Fattoush.

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I have always wnted to know the rilght way tomake zaattar, thanks!

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Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning. There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

#57 Naftal

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 09:20 AM

I know that there are people who use sumac( my favorite middle-eastern seasoning) to make lemonade. How do you do it? Do you use lemon juiceand sumac or just sumac? Enlighten me :blink:

Edited by Naftal, 18 May 2007 - 09:20 AM.

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)


#58 dondford

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 09:44 AM

Sumac lemonade is made from the red berry clusters found on live Sumac bushes. Pull the entire clusters off, wash as little as possible (the more you wash them, or if picked after a rain the weaker the tea will be). Seep in water and sweeten to taste.
Good luck.

Don

#59 Pam R

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 10:59 AM

Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning.  There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

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Right. But none of the blends I sell (or have seen) actually use zaatar leaves.

I don't have any real recipes that use sumac, but occasionally I'll use it when I make chicken kebabs. Just mix ground chicken with sumac, a little cumin, garlic, salt, pepper, grated red onion - onto sticks and chill. Grill and serve with fresh pita.

#60 melkor

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 11:08 AM

Zaatar is a plant (Majorana syriaca) - traditionally the leaves are used as a seasoning.  There are countless blends of spices that people use for a similar taste, but the right way to make zaatar is to use zaatar leaves.

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Right. But none of the blends I sell (or have seen) actually use zaatar leaves.

I don't have any real recipes that use sumac, but occasionally I'll use it when I make chicken kebabs. Just mix ground chicken with sumac, a little cumin, garlic, salt, pepper, grated red onion - onto sticks and chill. Grill and serve with fresh pita.

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You can find real zaatar in shops in the middle east, or you can grow your own. I've ordered seeds a few times but the orders always get screwed up. The zaatar I've got from Israel (made with zaatar) tastes quite different from the zaatar blend stuff I buy at the local middle-eastern market.