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The Violet Hour


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#211 avant-garde

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Posted 23 August 2008 - 03:40 PM

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Just now made one of these verbatim to the recipe. Oh my! *** swoon ***
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#212 Alchemist

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 04:51 AM

The Juliet & Romeo  gets a mention in Salon Magazine's Summer Cocktail Contest.

Maloney confounded our expectations by offering a savory, rather than sweet, drink with a refreshing cucumber taste. "Salty, but I like it!" one judge commented, while another added, "I hate gin, but I love this."

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Obviously from anyone who has one of these at TVH it is NOT a play on the dirty F*&King martini, the salt is there to bring forward the cucumber, not be an aspect of the drink. I should have given the amount of grains, (about 15-20 of kosher salt) and then it's possible that it would have come out more like it is at The Violet Hour.

This is the problem, and the joy of recipes. There is always room for some interpretation, and sometimes it works out well and sometimes it misses the mark.

I am not sure who has seen the thread over at the LTHfourm about making TVH drinks at home. This is the link. http://www.lthforum....hp?f=32&t=20283

It is better to give specifics and hope and prey it gets made correctly.

Toby

Edited to remove venom, bile and spite from post.

Edited by Alchemist, 24 August 2008 - 04:58 AM.




A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#213 Alex

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 09:44 AM

The Juliet & Romeo  gets a mention in Salon Magazine's Summer Cocktail Contest.

Maloney confounded our expectations by offering a savory, rather than sweet, drink with a refreshing cucumber taste. "Salty, but I like it!" one judge commented, while another added, "I hate gin, but I love this."

View Post


Obviously from anyone who has one of these at TVH it is NOT a play on the dirty F*&King martini, the salt is there to bring forward the cucumber, not be an aspect of the drink. I should have given the amount of grains, (about 15-20 of kosher salt) and then it's possible that it would have come out more like it is at The Violet Hour.

This is the problem, and the joy of recipes. There is always room for some interpretation, and sometimes it works out well and sometimes it misses the mark.

I am not sure who has seen the thread over at the LTHfourm about making TVH drinks at home. This is the link. http://www.lthforum....hp?f=32&t=20283

It is better to give specifics and hope and prey it gets made correctly.

Toby

Edited to remove venom, bile and spite from post.

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On LTH you specified Beefeater's gin, but IIRC, at TVH you used Hendrick's. How would you alter the LTH recipe, if at all, if we used Hendrick's at home?
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#214 avant-garde

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 10:11 AM


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The Art of Choke

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Just now made one of these verbatim to the recipe. Oh my! *** swoon ***

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Adding the below photo of the drink I made...

Posted Image
"A woman once drove me to drink and I never had the decency to thank her" - W.C. Fields

Thanks, The Hopry
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#215 Alchemist

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 07:18 PM

The Juliet & Romeo  gets a mention in Salon Magazine's Summer Cocktail Contest.

Maloney confounded our expectations by offering a savory, rather than sweet, drink with a refreshing cucumber taste. "Salty, but I like it!" one judge commented, while another added, "I hate gin, but I love this."

View Post


Obviously from anyone who has one of these at TVH it is NOT a play on the dirty F*&King martini, the salt is there to bring forward the cucumber, not be an aspect of the drink. I should have given the amount of grains, (about 15-20 of kosher salt) and then it's possible that it would have come out more like it is at The Violet Hour.

This is the problem, and the joy of recipes. There is always room for some interpretation, and sometimes it works out well and sometimes it misses the mark.

I am not sure who has seen the thread over at the LTHfourm about making TVH drinks at home. This is the link. http://www.lthforum....hp?f=32&t=20283

It is better to give specifics and hope and prey it gets made correctly.

Toby

Edited to remove venom, bile and spite from post.

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On LTH you specified Beefeater's gin, but IIRC, at TVH you used Hendrick's. How would you alter the LTH recipe, if at all, if we used Hendrick's at home?

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Yes go 2.50 Hendrick's as the first time I made it I was trying to get a beautiful woman drunk and...

Seriously as Hendricks is softer it totally works with the extra booze, but be careful of the rose water.

The original cocktail was with Hendrick's. And you can still go in and order it that way. It might be a wee bit more pricey than $11, there are worse cocktails out there made with sh*tter booze for more money. It was cost prohibitive to make a couple hundred a month at TVH. I tried it with all the options, Tanq, Bombay, Plymouth, Gordons ect. and I found that Beefeater had the taste profile that I perfered.

I wish, in a perfect world, that I could use every spirit that I loved on my cocktail menu. But there are times one makes a drink, a single drink that is designed to WOW and impress. Then when it comes time to produce it thousands of times over you find that the liquor cost is way out of wack. So the decision is to be made. Do you not make the cocktail or do you make it slightly different to the original? I felt that the J&R was solid enough to take a tweak and survive. Some don't.

I belive in the integrety of what goes in the glass. Look at my back bar, for the love of god look in my speed rail, it's all there.

I have a bunch of drinks with VEP, Johnny Walker Gold, and truffles that will never see a menu. If you want a $50 dollar cocktail I can hook you up. If I want to keep TVH open. Ask any chef if they have substituted one thing for another.

When it comes down to it it is a personal preference. She likes it with Hendricks, I like it with Juniperio. Tomatoe, Tomatoe, will not call the whole thing off.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#216 Alchemist

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Posted 24 August 2008 - 07:20 PM


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The Art of Choke

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Just now made one of these verbatim to the recipe. Oh my! *** swoon ***

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Adding the below photo of the drink I made...

Posted Image

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That is so amazing. The Art of Choke has never had such a loyal subject.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#217 Alchemist

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 01:13 PM

Fall is almost here, so here is a preview of what we are doing.

The Violet Hour
Autumn 2008 Cocktail List

GIN
Tom Collins Plymouth, Lemon, Simple Syrup
Juliet & Romeo Beefeater, Lime, Mint, Cucumber, Rose Water
The Riviera Pineapple Infused Beefeater, Lemon, Egg White, Campari
Slim Tanqueray, Lime, Aperol, St. Germaine Elderflower Liqueur, Fruta Bomba Bitters
The Fox Hunt Tanqueray, Pimms #1, Lemon, Cynar, Peychaud’s Bitters
The Berliner Tanqueray, Lemon, Gilka Kummel, Apricot, Egg Yolk, Tangerine Bitters

RUM
Daiquiri Flor de Caña 4 Year, Lime, Simple Syrup
Bula Mai Tai El Dorado 5 Year, Lime, House Made Roasted Orgeat
Hush & Wonder Matusalem, Lime, Crème de Violette, Grapefruit Bitters
Hemingway Daiquiri Ron Botran, Lime, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur, Grapefruit
Dark & Stormy Brugal Anejo, Cruzan Black Strap, Lime, House Made Ginger Syrup

WHISKEY
Manhattan Wild Turkey 101 Rye, Sweet Vermouth, Angostura Bitters
Eyes Wide Bulleit Bourbon, Grapefruit, House Made Raspberry Syrup, House Made Hibiscus Syrup
The Everleigh Rebel Yell Bourbon, Lemon, Egg White, Pecan Syrup, Coffee Bitters
Autumn Old Fashioned Powers Irish, House Made Falernum, Luxardo Bitter
Woolworth’s Manhattan Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth, Root Beer Bitters
Six Corner Sling Old Overholdt Rye, Lemon, Punte Mes, Grapefruit Bitters

TEQUILA
Margarita Chinaco Blanco, Lime, Cointreau
Spanish Margarita Zapopan Plata, Lime, Licor 43, Hell-fire Bitters
La Hora El Tesoro Platina, Lemon, Plymouth Sloe Gin, Egg White, Angostura Bitters

BRANDY & COGNAC
Sidecar Hennessey VS Cognac, Lemon, Cointreau
Iron Cross Pisco Tabernero Italia, Lemon, Egg White, Orange Flower Water
The Orchard Laird’s Bonded Applejack, Lemon, Maple Syrup, Pimento Dram
Chicago Flip Hennessey VS Cognac, Fresh Cream, Tawny Port, Whole Egg, Nutmeg

WINE & SPARKLING
Champagne Cocktail Gruet Sparkling, Sugar Cube, Angostura Bitters
The Etiquette Gruet Sparkling, Lime, Pisco Acholado, House Made Raspberry Syrup
Autumn Sangria Pinot Noir, Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum, Apricot, Apple, Blackberry
The Empire Builder Gruet Sparkling, Lemon, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur, White Crème de Cacao

CORDIALS
Pimms Cup Pimms #1, Orange, Cucumber, Strawberry, Mint
Maloney’s Irish Cream Powers Irish, Fresh Cream, Ardbeg Scotch, Orange Flower Water
Broken Shoe Shiner Kubler Absinthe, Lemon, Aperol, Egg White, Benedictine, Rose Water
The Art of Choke Variation Cynar, Beefeater Gin, House Falernum, Mint

VODKA
Moscow Mule Tito’s, Lime, House Made Ginger Syrup, Soda Water
Vodka Cobbler Tito’s Vodka, Lemon, Lillet Blonde, Fresh Fruit
Part & Parcel Tito’s, Grapefruit, St. Germaine Elderflower Liqueur, Grapefruit Bitters

There a couple of changes on this menu. First you will notice that there are classsics leading off each category. We are going to feature the cocktails that started this whole cocktail craze a little over 200 years ago. I think that this will be interesting for patrons, first timers and regulars, and the bartenders alike.

The other thing is that we have an unprecedented amount of vodka drinks on the menu. it grew by 50%. Which is huge.

This menu will be in effect very, very soon.

Happy autumn to all.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#218 Chris Amirault

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 04:25 PM

So fantastic, and so many questions.

I assume that the almonds are roasted for the orgeat, yes?

What vermouth for the Manhattan?

Is the hibiscus syrup hibiscus tea simple with sugar? Or some other method?

Care to share the proportions for the Art of Choke variation (specifically the falernum)?
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#219 Alchemist

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 04:41 PM

Yes the almonds are roasted. There is also bitter orange macerated into the mixture. Steven also adds both orange and rose water. It is f@#king amazing.

Martini and Rossi, sweet. 2x1 booze to vermouth. Angostura bitters, three dashes. The only change from a classic is a twist instead of a cherry.

It is straight hibiscus flowers from Tera Spice. It is amazing. It turns the simple the most beautiful color before your eyes.

The falernum is house made so you will have to play with it with the Velvet.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#220 avant-garde

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 04:52 PM

Toby -

I know it should never be the intention to go to a bar to get completely blitzed out of your mind, but I have a feeling that if (and when) I ever get to enjoy your establishment, I may not know when to stop. I see about 15 drinks I'd love to order.

Every time you post these menus it just drives me insane with inspiration.

Another amazing looking menu, Toby.

Thanks for sharing...
"A woman once drove me to drink and I never had the decency to thank her" - W.C. Fields

Thanks, The Hopry
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#221 Alchemist

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 01:18 PM

Toby -

I know it should never be the intention to go to a bar to get completely blitzed out of your mind, but I have a feeling that if (and when) I ever get to enjoy your establishment, I may not know when to stop.  I see about 15 drinks I'd love to order.

Every time you post these menus it just drives me insane with inspiration. 

Another amazing looking menu, Toby.

Thanks for sharing...

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Intention sheshmention. Sometimes inebriation happens in a bar. I would just say to make sure you stay 3 nights so you can go twice with a hungover day between. Then get on the plane on the forth day and head to Betty Ford, or some awful lemon juice/maple syrup/cayenne cleanse. Between the food and drink you will need it.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#222 Alex

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Posted 26 September 2008 - 08:12 PM

Toby -

I know it should never be the intention to go to a bar to get completely blitzed out of your mind, but I have a feeling that if (and when) I ever get to enjoy your establishment, I may not know when to stop.  I see about 15 drinks I'd love to order.

Every time you post these menus it just drives me insane with inspiration. 

Another amazing looking menu, Toby.

Thanks for sharing...

View Post


Intention sheshmention. Sometimes inebriation happens in a bar. I would just say to make sure you stay 3 nights so you can go twice with a hungover day between. Then get on the plane on the forth day and head to Betty Ford, or some awful lemon juice/maple syrup/cayenne cleanse. Between the food and drink you will need it.

Toby

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Mmm, lemon juice, maple syrup, and cayenne. I wonder how that would go with bourbon. Blitzing and cleansing, all in one convenient package.

On a side, but related, note, have you ever had BLiS Bourbon Barrel Matured Maple Syrup? Amazing stuff.
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#223 tammylc

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 03:05 AM

Toby -

I know it should never be the intention to go to a bar to get completely blitzed out of your mind, but I have a feeling that if (and when) I ever get to enjoy your establishment, I may not know when to stop.  I see about 15 drinks I'd love to order.

Every time you post these menus it just drives me insane with inspiration. 

Another amazing looking menu, Toby.

Thanks for sharing...

View Post


Intention sheshmention. Sometimes inebriation happens in a bar. I would just say to make sure you stay 3 nights so you can go twice with a hungover day between. Then get on the plane on the forth day and head to Betty Ford, or some awful lemon juice/maple syrup/cayenne cleanse. Between the food and drink you will need it.

Toby

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Inebriation at the Violet Hour? I would know absolutely nothing about such a thing as that. (Thanks Toby!)

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#224 DutchMuse

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 03:58 PM

I haven't read all the pages of this thread, but anyone know if the Violet Hour has Old Raj gin?

Also....if I go around 6:30 (shortly after they open) on Sunday night, I presume there won't be a wait, correct?

#225 Alchemist

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 05:47 AM

I haven't read all the pages of this thread, but anyone know if the Violet Hour has Old Raj gin?

Also....if I go around 6:30 (shortly after they open) on Sunday night, I presume there won't be a wait, correct?

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Yes The Violet Hour does have Old Raj. I love the pictures on the side of the bottle. There are Victorian looking hunters, in pith helmets, staring down a charging tiger with the caption. Drink Old Raj straight. Then on the other side they same brave hunters sit on a verandah, laughing over their brave conquest, and it says Or Drink Old Raj With Tonic. Good thinking I say not to fuss about with ice, lime and tonic when the lion is baring down on you. Best to leave that for later, on the verandah.

There should be no line on a sunday at 6:30.

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#226 DutchMuse

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 06:06 AM

Thanks, Toby--I haven't yet found Old Raj in Chicago in a bar so it will be a pleasure to to go there this weekend. Sounds great.

#227 Alchemist

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Posted 03 October 2008 - 06:21 PM

Here is a little about TVH.

http://chicagoist.co...olet_h.php#more

Toby



A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

#228 DutchMuse

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Posted 06 October 2008 - 05:34 PM

What a GREAT place! Loved it--even if you guys were out of Old Raj. But Kyle, the very talented and knowledgeable bartender, made a lovely martini of Junipero. We then tried an experiment with American-made jenever which was interesting but Kyle wasn't totally happy with the experiment so he left me with the Junipero, which I thought very fine.

I learned a lot, too. Before last night, I didn't know that Vermouth was a wine that should only last 3 or so days in the refrigerator. I had been making the mistake of buying a large bottle of Noilly Prat....next time I'll put it in a 375ml bottle or smaller so as not to oxidize it. Also fun talking about shaking versus stirring (now I know why I had always preferred a martini be stirred and never shaken--but just thought it was a personal preference).

For me, I enjoy olives in the martini but understand its not considered 'pure.' Would you guys ever consider carrying olives? (There are some great ones, by the way, that to me, add to the martini experience. My friends at Tabla in NYC--who serve Old Raj, always stirred--buy olives from The Pickle Guy and they are impressive).

#229 DutchMuse

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 08:18 PM

Went there tonight. They did have Old Raj gin (yea!). However, they have a ways to go....

They weren't too busy; most people were sitting by the bar; few people were at tables.

My partner ordered caipirnhas; loved them.

I ordered Old Raj martini's--two of them. Disappointing.

The first one--was served in an ice cold glass, as would be proper, but the remaining liquid was to be poured in a room temperature mini-carafe (not cold). I asked that it be poured in another ice cold glass and the mixologist gladly and politely complied.

The problem with the martini was that the taste of vermouth was prominent. This was true of the first martini, and the second. For the second, I asked that it be served "very, very dry." It still tasted predominantly of the Noilly-Prat vermouth.

We asked the mixologist what ratio he used for gin to vermouth: he replied "two to one." (The last weekend when we were there, the mixologist said "three to one" meaning three parts gin to one part vermouth).

The vermouth was prominent; could not taste the Old Raj gin in either of my drinks.

My suggestion would be to get the proper ratio of Old Raj to vermouth down; then serve the remainder that doesn't fir in the first glass (as Pegu Club, for instance) in a carafe over ice to keep it cold. Never should it be put in a room temperature carafe.

To me, its still a work in progress.

#230 docsconz

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Posted 13 October 2008 - 04:58 AM

Wow, what a major change in tone from post to post! Was this due to bartender variation, a Sunday night or something else?
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#231 philadining

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 12:09 PM

I'm sure there's some variation from bartender to bartender, that's probably true anywhere, and I can't vouch for the depth of talent at the bar, but I just have to say that I had three spectacular drinks on Sunday, stirred-up by Henry.

It was pretty slow when I first got there, which allowed for some chat about the drinks and description of my preferences, which always helps. Perhaps thanks to that initial contact, the quality of the drinks didn't go down as the place got busier, and I got three beverages that were not only delicious and interesting, but that pushed my personal buttons really well.

I started with the Autumn Old Fashioned
(Powers Irish, House Made Falernum, Luxardo Bitters)
Posted Image
The Falernum and bitters gave this a great spicy, smoky, complex edge. I really like how it changed as it slowly diluted. And it was slow, that's an awesome ice cube...

Moved on to the Woolworth’s Manhattan
(Buffalo Trace Bourbon, Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth, Root Beer Bitters)
Posted Image
I was worried at first that this would be overwhelmed by the Root Beer element, it's pretty aggressive on the nose, but it was all balanced out very nicely on the palate. It's more bitter than the average Manhattan, but that's a good thing in my book...

And for my third drink, I asked Henry to just make whatever he felt like, no restrictions. He was still debating about a name for this one, I think it was at least temporarily "The Barracuda"
Posted Image

There was some strawberry, some tequila, bitters, chile... so it was sweet, but also had quite a bite to it. I really liked it a lot, it was refreshing but not too fruity.

Overall, I had a great time at the Violet Hour. I thought the drinks were excellent, the vibe was welcoming, the music was good, and I had a great time chatting with, and getting some good dining advice from, a couple sitting next to me at the bar.

Much credit to Henry: he made some great drinks, and more impressively, was able to target my taste pretty accurately, which certainly made the evening more enjoyable.

I'm plotting another visit to Chicago for a couple of reasons, and wanting to return to the Violet Hour is one of them...

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#232 DutchMuse

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 02:10 PM

I think its bartender variation. One week prior to my ill-fated 'vermouth martini' evening, I had outstanding martinis (made by, as I recall, Kyle (?)). But he told us he was going to Publican except for 2 days per week, and I have a feeling some new talent was recruited for Violet Hour.

Sounds like Henry was the right choice. The person who took care of us (I didn't get his name) was really behind the curve. He confided he wasn't an expert on martini's (huh?), and when we ordered Sammies, he didn't provide cloth napkins or plates. A food runner handed them to us, commenting "They've been sitting there for a while so I thought I'd just give them to you."

Not to be so negative about the place; it is a wonderful environment and when its on, its REALLY ON. It can be world class. But a place that aspires to be 'world class' must (IMHO) be held to that standard and shouldn't have bartender/mixologist talent that isn't ready for prime time.

I've recently (well, five months now) moved from NY to Chicago. One difference I've noted---NY will definitely hold a place to a standard and 'call' them on it if they fall short. Chicago folks, interestingly enough. seem to accept things as they are more than would happen in NY.

I feel that Violet Hour is a top notch place that seeks to attain excellence. If we merely accept what is offered (flaws included), they will never be prompted to attain the excellence they could otherwise achieve.

All that said, I look forward to going there on a regular basis and will always have a great time, no doubt. I just want them to be held to the standard to which I know they aspire and are capable of ultimately achieving.

New Yorker's are not so forgiving; Chicagoans are a bit, if I may be so bold (now living here), a bit over-forgiving.

Surely there is a middle ground.

Edited by DutchMuse, 14 October 2008 - 05:45 PM.


#233 docsconz

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Posted 14 October 2008 - 07:33 PM

I think its bartender variation.  One week prior to my ill-fated 'vermouth martini' evening, I had outstanding martinis (made by, as I recall, Kyle (?)).  But he told us he was going to Publican except for 2 days per week, and I have a feeling some new talent was recruited for Violet Hour.

Sounds like Henry was the right choice.  The person who took care of us (I didn't get his name) was really behind the curve. He confided he wasn't an expert on martini's (huh?), and when we ordered Sammies, he didn't provide cloth napkins or plates. A food runner handed them to us, commenting "They've been sitting there for a while so I thought I'd just give them to you."

Not to be so negative about the place; it is a wonderful environment and when its on, its REALLY ON.  It can be world class.  But a place that aspires to be 'world class' must (IMHO) be held to that standard and shouldn't have bartender/mixologist talent that isn't ready for prime time.

I've recently (well, five months now) moved from NY to Chicago.  One difference I've noted---NY will definitely hold a place to a standard and 'call' them on it if they fall short.  Chicago folks, interestingly enough. seem to accept things as they are more than would happen in NY.

I feel that Violet Hour is a top notch place that seeks to attain excellence.  If we merely accept what is offered (flaws included), they will never be prompted to attain the excellence they could otherwise achieve.

All that said, I look forward to going there on a regular basis and will always have a great time, no doubt.  I just want them to be held to the standard to which I know they aspire and are capable of ultimately achieving.

New Yorker's are not so forgiving; Chicagoans are a bit, if I may be so bold (now living here), a bit over-forgiving.

Surely there is a middle ground.

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Thanks for the fine explanation. Sounds fair to me.
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#234 Darren72

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Posted 16 October 2008 - 08:49 AM

NY will definitely hold a place to a standard and 'call' them on it if they fall short.  Chicago folks, interestingly enough. seem to accept things as they are more than would happen in NY.


You are also posting thoughts on Chicago restaurants at LTHforum.com. It seems a lot of your posts are along the lines of "this place would never last in NY," or "the food scene in Chicago doesn't hold a candle to that in NY". Naturally you are going to get some pushback from people who think you are basing your judgment on a very small sample, and that you aren't picking the best Chicago has to offer. I think you'll also notice on LTHforum (and here) that the people can be incredibly over-critical about Chicago restaurants.

Your posts at lthforum on the Violet Hour are a good example. Here you had two posts describing your two visits. Over there you only posted about the second (disappointing) visit and basically said that the place isn't very good because they don't make a good Martini. The response you got was that people's tastes differ and that your preferred Martini recipe wasn't necessarily the only "proper" one. I would hardly say this response means people accept mediocrity.

#235 db_campbell

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 08:05 AM

We asked the mixologist what ratio he used for gin to vermouth: he replied "two to one." (The last weekend when we were there, the mixologist said "three to one" meaning three parts gin to one part vermouth).

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My (uninformed) guess is that the bartender was attempting to stage a fair fight of sorts between the Old Raj and vermouth, hence the variation in ratios; not that Junipero isn't big-boned in its own right, but Old Raj is such a massive gin that in my estimation it tends to exist within a stratum unto itself.

#236 DutchMuse

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Posted 18 October 2008 - 12:04 PM

Could be, db. I think he was also attempting to get the right ratio of water (i.e. melted ice) to offset the 'hot' aspect of the Raj.

Darren--sorry for any confusion. On each board, I interact with posters and other than the initial post, my responses are tailored to the discussion at hand on that board.

#237 newbie21

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Posted 18 October 2008 - 01:04 PM

Could be, db.  I think he was also attempting to get the right ratio of water (i.e. melted ice) to offset the 'hot' aspect of the Raj.


Even with my limited knowledge, I don't think that's right....the Kold Draft ice melts so slowly, and, with or without kold draft, I don't think the bartenders are trying to figure water from melted ice into their ratios.

#238 newbie21

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 02:10 PM

I was mistakingly thinking that since ice is always present, that it wouldn't be a factor in ratios. I hadn't considered the type of ice or the proof of the alcohol. I have been educated....thanks, Toby!

#239 Chris Amirault

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 02:16 PM

Not to belabor the point, but ice (that is to say, water) is always factored into ratios. It's the reason that bartenders make drinks from room-temperature booze. Knowing which drinks to let sit for how long before straining is one of the ways that a good bartender practices his craft.
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#240 newbie21

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 02:35 PM

Not to belabor the point, but ice (that is to say, water) is always factored into ratios. It's the reason that bartenders make drinks from room-temperature booze. Knowing which drinks to let sit for how long before straining is one of the ways that a good bartender practices his craft.

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...right! And how long to stir/shake it....makes perfect sense. Thanks!!