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Lapsang Souchong


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19 replies to this topic

#1 NulloModo

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 03:20 PM

I have been getting more into tea lately. Today, while trying to kill some time at the mall, I wandered into the Coffee Beanery and discovered they have a nice setup of 'Republic of Tea' teas, which I have heard good things about. Well, most were pretty plain and boring looking, earl grey, green tea, honey and ginger, etc, stuff you can find anywhere. Well, one then caught my eye, a tea called 'Lapsang Souchong' which is apparently fermented and smoked over pine wood according to the blurb on the back. I also had to pick up a tea-ball as this didn't seem to come in bags.

I just had a glass, and my first impression is I really like it. It has a fully, smokey, tangy taste. I added a bit of splenda to it, but I had a few sips without and it was almost as good that way. Has anyone else had this stuff before? Are there other similar teas out there?
He don't mix meat and dairy,
He don't eat humble pie,
So sing a miserere
And hang the bastard high!

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#2 Mnehrling

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 03:22 PM

I absolutely love this stuff. Many times people walk in my office when I steep a pot to see if something is burning.
I have learned this makes a wonderful seasoning agent. The last time I brined a turkey, I put about 5 teabags in the liquid and it infused a great smoke flavor. Also add it to steaming liquid.
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#3 slkinsey

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 03:24 PM

Yes, lapsang souchong is a really cool tea. The cheaper versions can be a little harsh, but the good stuff can really be something special.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#4 iamthestretch

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 03:27 PM

Makes a good rub, too. There's a Ming Tsai recipe for short ribs braised in riesling that I've made a few times using Lapsang Souchon to great acclaim.
"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

#5 "T"

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 07:43 PM

Be careful not to consume too much as it is carcinogenic.

But so is walking in downtown during rush hour.
What's a brutha to do?

Drink up. :cool:
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#6 NulloModo

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 09:02 PM

Be careful not to consume too much as it is carcinogenic.

But so is walking in downtown during rush hour.
What's a brutha to do?

Drink up.  :cool:

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Eh, I live in Delaware, so, if I get cancer (which I have a pretty high chance of if I stay here the rest of my life, which I don't plan to) it will be thanks to DuPont or one of the other dozens of major chemical companies here. I tend not to worry about risks like that in food, and hey, this tea tastes a hell of a lot better than teflon.
He don't mix meat and dairy,
He don't eat humble pie,
So sing a miserere
And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

#7 "T"

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 09:43 PM

LOL. Nullo that was funny.

Sucks about Dupont though.
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#8 appreciator

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 09:50 PM

Be careful not to consume too much as it is carcinogenic.

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And this would be because :huh: ......... the smoky quality perhaps?

Or am I just taking things too seriously again? :wacko:
sarah

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#9 jpr54_

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 09:39 AM

I also had to pick up a tea-ball as this didn't seem to come in bags.

I just had a glass, and my first impression is I really like it. It has a fully, smokey, tangy taste. I added a bit of splenda to it, but I had a few sips without and it was almost as good that way. Has anyone else had this stuff before? Are there other similar teas out there?

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[/quote]

there are paper tea filters that are available-
teeli paper filters
finum tee filters
you could also place 2 tsps of loose tea in glass and then brew and pur liquid into another glass-

#10 "T"

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 10:18 AM

Be careful not to consume too much as it is carcinogenic.

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And this would be because :huh: ......... the smoky quality perhaps?

Or am I just taking things too seriously again? :wacko:

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Similar to smoked meats, you shouldn't consume too much of those products either.

If you enjoy it though a cup of Lapsang in moderation is fine.
slowfood/slowwine

#11 wkl

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 07:21 AM

Nullo,
Maybe you already know of Upton Teas, but if not check out their site.
www.uptonteas.com.Awesome selection of loose teas.Yes they have Lapsong Suchong too.
A good way to start out is to order a few sample packs of different teas that interest you.

#12 cdh

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 07:38 AM

Lapsangs are really nice teas. They do, however, vary widely.

From their name, they should be fairly large whole leaves if the tea is being true to style-- "souchong" means that. Often they aren't. But it can be fun trying to figure out what the base tea under there is.

Also the smoke can vary. Traditionally they were smoked over evergreens, giving them a resiny tang. Some LS out there tastes hardwood smoked, which, again is a nice change.

You could probably line up 5 or 6 lapsangs for a side by side and taste for the differences. Could be a fun exercise in palate building.

I happen to like the LS that Jacksons of Picadilly sells... or sold... mine is probably 10 years old... no telling if it is consistent over time. But the one I've got seems to be a broken leaf indian or ceylon, with some hardwood smoke to it. Contrary to style, but still good.
Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

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#13 johnnyd

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 08:50 AM

This is my favourite tea. I ordered it at a tea house in Montreux once and it was served VERY strong with about a 1:1 cream and buttloads of demerara.

I don't drink it any other way now.
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#14 fou de Bassan

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 10:07 AM

I love lapsang souchong. Now, this may be tea heresy but, I like to mix LS with earl grey. I like the combination of tastes.
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#15 His Nibs

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:25 PM

I've heard that Twinings blends some lapsang souchong into their Earl Grey. Kind of a slight smoky hint behind all that bergamot oils :D

#16 naguere

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 01:35 PM

lapsang souchong;

A tea for grownups.

like bitter beer the taste needs to be aquired. The flavour comes from bergamot, an orange flavoured herb.

I take a cup every month or so, it is to be savoured.
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#17 cdh

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 12:39 PM

lapsang souchong;

A tea for grownups.

like bitter beer the taste needs to be aquired. The flavour comes from bergamot, an orange flavoured herb.

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Ummmmm... no.

Lapsang Souchong has nothing to do with bergamot (which, btw, is a citrus fruit). Lapsang is smoked tea. (Earl Gray is the bergamot tea.)

Definitely a tea for grownups.
Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

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Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

#18 ghostrider

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 12:55 PM

I drank Lapsangs for a couple of decades. Then they just got boring.

These days I'm focused on Assams & Ceylons & the occasional Nepal.

I wouldn't mention this in this thread, but the "tea for grownups" comments make me think that I've entered the next phase of life. "Tea for geezers" anyone? :raz:
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#19 andiesenji

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Posted 11 February 2005 - 02:54 PM

I drank Lapsangs for a couple of decades.  Then they just got boring.

These days I'm focused on Assams & Ceylons & the occasional Nepal.

I wouldn't mention this in this thread, but the "tea for grownups" comments make me think that I've entered the next phase of life.  "Tea for geezers" anyone?  :raz:

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Sounds like I might be a candidate - my current fascination are the Nilgiri teas.
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#20 jokhm

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 08:28 PM

Hmm.. I do sell Lapsang Souchong, but whenever I've had to go through some sampling sessions I always partially gag! It is funny though. When I first settled here in Beijing I had to really push people in the tea business to produce some. No one had anything to do with LS. I suppose this has a lot to do with all the different preferences common in each area of China. Some places prefer very specific tastes. Here in the north it happens to be flower teas; also not quite my thing although they have their place and time.
Anyhow.. perhaps the smokiness puts several other smoked meat images in my mind.. and distracts from the tea. Maybe I'm just addicted to too many other oolongs at the moment. I'll wait for it to wear off and then try some LS again.

Joel