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The Punch Topic


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#61 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 06:55 PM

One punch that I've yet to hear about in the forums is the Chatham Artillery punch from Imbibe. It is the last punch recipe in the book and the instructions are a little leave-it-to-the-reader but, I have to say, after making it, this punch is one of most delightful/deceitful punches I have ever made. I recommend it, top notch.

When you visit the town of savannah
Enlist 'neath the temperance banneh,
For if you should lunch,
On artillery punch,
It will treat you in sorrowful manneh.


Artillery Punch, what a name

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What did you use in place of the Catawba Wine? Or do you have a source for such a thing? I would imagine that the availability of that is the primary thing keeping most punchophiles here from making it.
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#62 db_campbell

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 06:26 AM

What did you use in place of the Catawba Wine? Or do you have a source for such a thing? I would imagine that the availability of that is the primary thing keeping most punchophiles here from making it.

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Taylor of NY makes a Catawba that some Total Wine locations carry; I've also seen it in an out of the way liquor store in unincorporated Newberry, FL. I imagine most anything from Taylor ought to be orderable online, or if a local wine shop has a distribution deal w/ Taylor, I don't see why they couldn't special order it for you.

The question then becomes, given Taylor's status as an industrial wine producer (the Catawba itself comes in a magnum), is it any good? Hard to say, as it's the only one I've ever had. Prof. Wondrich is quite right in comparing it to White Zin, though.

Incidentally, I layed down a batch of Chatham last Wednesday, so I'll be able to report back around time of the Final Four I'm thinking.

#63 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 08:55 AM

What did you use in place of the Catawba Wine? Or do you have a source for such a thing? I would imagine that the availability of that is the primary thing keeping most punchophiles here from making it.

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The question then becomes, given Taylor's status as an industrial wine producer (the Catawba itself comes in a magnum), is it any good? Hard to say, as it's the only one I've ever had. Prof. Wondrich is quite right in comparing it to White Zin, though.

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I've been told by those in the know that the biggest difference between off-dry rose like White Zinfandel and Catawba is that White Zin lacks the trademark 'foxy' character of Vitis labrusca, of which Catawba is a varietal. I wonder, though, how critical that character is to the punch, or if it is actually desireable at all (could have just been working with what they had, right?)
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#64 shantytownbrown

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 10:21 AM

I recently read about this punch in Food and Wine january issue i had misplaced and recently browsed...

I am going to a dinner party, and wanted to bring a cocktail, and thought this would be a good idea...

need to scale for 6 folks two drinks apeice

http://www.foodandwi...ish-house-punch

how does this version stack up?
would you reccomend another variation?
what rum and what brandy would you use for this? I have a bottle of Landy VS in the house...would this work?

(I am in the market for new light and dark rum for my shelf as it is)

thanks in advance

shanty

#65 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 02:51 PM

I recently read about this punch in Food and Wine january issue i had misplaced and recently browsed...

I am going to a dinner party, and wanted to bring a cocktail, and thought this would be a good idea...

need to scale for 6 folks two drinks apeice

http://www.foodandwi...ish-house-punch

how does this version stack up?
would you reccomend another variation?
what rum and what brandy would you use for this? I have a bottle of Landy VS in the house...would this work?

(I am in the market for new light and dark rum for my shelf as it is)

thanks in advance

shanty

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Just by looking at this recipe, I'd be very wary with that high of a ratio of peach liqueur. As Mr. Wondrich explains in Imbibe!, the peach brandy called for in the original was more akin to an applejack than a peach schnapps. In other words, a barrel-aged distillate of peaches and their kernels. Modern "peach brandy" is made by flavoring grape brandy with peaches and sweetening it. It's flavor permeates, so go easy: Dr. Wondrich prescribes that the peach liqueur should make up 1/16 of the volume of spirits in the punch.

Not sure how dedicated to merriment your guests are, but I've had a group of six go through a full bowl (about 5 quarts + ice block) of fish house punch in under two hours, no problem. Not something to do on a school night, mind you :wink:

As far as the brands go, I've not had the Landy but if it makes good sidecars I suspect it would make acceptable punch as well. For rum, I really like the Goslings Black Seal for the price, and if you mix equal parts of the Goslings 80 proof and 151, you have a wicked punch rum on your hands. Also to consider, while I've never made it in bowl quantities, the Fish House Punch recipe responds quite nicely to having Laird's Bonded subbed in for the peach brandy (maintaining the original preportions). Should you not have a copy of Jerry Thomas or Imbibe! handy (for shame), the recipe can be found here. Dr. Wondrich's suggestion to halve the sugar is a good one, and part of the water can be replaced with your ice block.
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#66 shantytownbrown

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 04:38 PM

Just by looking at this recipe, I'd be very wary with that high of a ratio of peach liqueur. As Mr. Wondrich explains in Imbibe!, the peach brandy called for in the original was more akin to an applejack than a peach schnapps. In other words, a barrel-aged distillate of peaches and their kernels. Modern "peach brandy" is made by flavoring grape brandy with peaches and sweetening it. It's flavor permeates, so go easy: Dr. Wondrich prescribes that the peach liqueur should make up 1/16 of the volume of spirits in the punch.

Not sure how dedicated to merriment your guests are, but I've had a group of six go through a full bowl (about 5 quarts + ice block) of fish house punch in under two hours, no problem. Not something to do on a school night, mind you  :wink:

As far as the brands go, I've not had the Landy but if it makes good sidecars I suspect it would make acceptable punch as well. For rum, I really like the Goslings Black Seal for the price, and if you mix equal parts of the Goslings 80 proof and 151, you have a wicked punch rum on your hands. Also to consider, while I've never made it in bowl quantities, the Fish House Punch recipe responds quite nicely to having Laird's Bonded subbed in for the peach brandy (maintaining the original preportions). Should you not have a copy of Jerry Thomas or Imbibe! handy (for shame), the recipe can be found here. Dr. Wondrich's suggestion to halve the sugar is a good one, and part of the water can be replaced with your ice block.



landy makes an decent but not great sidecar..i was sold this before i discovered this site and its knowlege base...

unfortunately Laird's bonded seems not available to me, or my shopkeeper doesnt know where to find it in his "book"...

I think I can also only get gosling's 80, which i planned to buy anyway as summer and Dark and Stormy time is coming

any alternate rum advice for this mix...

oh and what do you make of the black tea in this version

thanks for the link to art of drink site

Edited by heidih, 30 April 2009 - 05:50 PM.


#67 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 05:10 PM

Goslings 80 makes perfectly delightful Fish House Punch, I've used it many a time.

As for the tea...it probably wouldn't be bad, but I think it may be a bit busy for this.
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#68 RoyalSwagger

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 10:35 PM

Pusser's navy strength is another great rum for the fish house punch, in fact a great rum for punches in general.

#69 KatieLoeb

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Posted 30 April 2009 - 11:06 PM

I've made this many times. I like brandy and Sailor Jerry spiced rum as my base spirits, a Demerara simple syrup to bring that molasses flavor to the party and a better quality apricot brandy like Brizard Apry instead of low level peach schnapps. Adjust simple to taste since the apricot brandy is less of a sweetening agent than the schnapps would be. DO NOT oversteep your tea or it will ruin everything. I'm certain the brandy you have will be fine as long as it isn't too "woody". A glug of orange juice is often good in this recipe in addition to the lemon.

I'd be cautious of adding any really high proof spirits to this. I presume this isn't for a frat party, but for a group of adults with discerning palates. This goes down easily enough already without intentionally spiking it for drunkeness and debauchery. And it's so unattractive when folks hurl in technicolor. :rolleyes:

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#70 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 08:28 AM

Pusser's navy strength is another great rum for the fish house punch, in fact a great rum for punches in general.

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Agreed, Pussers is a great old-school styled rum, though a little more pricey, at least around here.

I've not had great success subbing Apry for Peach Brandy, or vice-versa, peach brandy just has so much intensity it can overwhelm. It is, as Ms. Loeb points out, imperative to use something better than any bottle labelled 'peach schnapps'. The Marie Brizard is not common, even for M-B, but it can be had online for about $25 or less, which will make lots of Fish House Punch. Failing that, DeKuyper Peach Brandy isn't utterly gross, but it certainly has room for improvement.

As far as higher proof spirits, I wouldn't go overboard and start adding 151 or anything, but higher proof = more flavor, generally speaking. Of course FHP is plenty flavorful with all 80 proof as well.
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#71 slkinsey

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 09:22 AM

One other possibility would be to do something like roasting some peaches, crushing the kernels, and infusing them into something like Laird's bonded.
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#72 shantytownbrown

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 04:41 PM

I've made this many times.  I like brandy and Sailor Jerry spiced rum as my base spirits, a Demerara simple syrup to bring that molasses flavor to the party and a better quality apricot brandy like Brizard Apry instead of low level peach schnapps.  Adjust simple to taste since the apricot brandy is less of a sweetening agent than the schnapps would be.  DO NOT oversteep your tea or it will ruin everything. I'm certain the brandy you have will be fine as long as it isn't too "woody".  A glug of orange juice is often good in this recipe in addition to the lemon.

I'd be cautious of adding any really high proof spirits to this.  I presume this isn't for a frat party, but for a group of adults with discerning palates.  This goes down easily enough already without intentionally spiking it for drunkeness and debauchery.  And it's so unattractive when folks hurl in technicolor.  :rolleyes:

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I have Sailor Jerry's already in the cabinet, just added Gosling's 80 today, and while browsing for something to replace the "peach schnapps" I found something called "Mathilde Peach Liqueur" and was hoping this may fit the flavor profile i should be looking for. My shop guy said it is sweeter than Peach Eau de Vie but much less than Peach schnapps...

any thoughts?

also, should i go for the goslings or use the Sailor J in this punch variiation.

(i am not a big apricot fan, so unlikely Apry, as good as it is, will ever make it into my cocktailian repetoire--its just me)

#73 Splificator

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 10:24 PM

should i go for the goslings or use the Sailor J in this punch variiation.

Gosling's si, SJ no.
Mathilde should work a-ok.
Don't forget the nutmeg.
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#74 shantytownbrown

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 05:15 AM

a Demerara simple syrup to bring that molasses flavor to the party

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how much? start small and add to taste?
i assume in place of the confectioners(from the F&W recipe)..?
and would i then still need the water, i would guess no...?


scott

#75 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 08:32 AM

a Demerara simple syrup to bring that molasses flavor to the party

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how much? start small and add to taste?
i assume in place of the confectioners(from the F&W recipe)..?
and would i then still need the water, i would guess no...?


scott

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Water is a crucial element to punch, The most successful punches in a bowl I've made have had a final abv in the finished product of between 12% and 15%, so I think it's a good idea to get the pocket calculator out and figure out how much water to add. Not enough dilution and it's definitely going to have an interesting (and not necessarily desireable) effect on the party. The rules for punch are different than the rules for cocktails.

Edited by thirtyoneknots, 02 May 2009 - 08:33 AM.

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#76 shantytownbrown

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 09:01 AM

a Demerara simple syrup to bring that molasses flavor to the party

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how much? start small and add to taste?
i assume in place of the confectioners(from the F&W recipe)..?
and would i then still need the water, i would guess no...?


scott

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Water is a crucial element to punch, The most successful punches in a bowl I've made have had a final abv in the finished product of between 12% and 15%, so I think it's a good idea to get the pocket calculator out and figure out how much water to add. Not enough dilution and it's definitely going to have an interesting (and not necessarily desireable) effect on the party. The rules for punch are different than the rules for cocktails.

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if i use simple syrup (deremera) in place of the confectioners, do i count that water in the calculation?

#77 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 11:13 AM

a Demerara simple syrup to bring that molasses flavor to the party

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how much? start small and add to taste?
i assume in place of the confectioners(from the F&W recipe)..?
and would i then still need the water, i would guess no...?


scott

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Water is a crucial element to punch, The most successful punches in a bowl I've made have had a final abv in the finished product of between 12% and 15%, so I think it's a good idea to get the pocket calculator out and figure out how much water to add. Not enough dilution and it's definitely going to have an interesting (and not necessarily desireable) effect on the party. The rules for punch are different than the rules for cocktails.

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if i use simple syrup (deremera) in place of the confectioners, do i count that water in the calculation?

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You can, though you're really going for a total volume thing. For the record, an ounce of 1:1 syrup contains about 2/3 oz of water, 2:1 syrup about 1/2 oz per oz of syrup.

If you're making an actual bowl-sized recipe, many old punch recipes call for the infusion of the sugar with some lemon peel oils, nowadays accomplished by peeling some of the lemons (minimize the amount of white part) and muddling them with the sugar. If you're starting with syrup you already have on hand of course you would probably have to skip this step.
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#78 shantytownbrown

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 11:21 AM

a Demerara simple syrup to bring that molasses flavor to the party

View Post


how much? start small and add to taste?
i assume in place of the confectioners(from the F&W recipe)..?
and would i then still need the water, i would guess no...?


scott

View Post


Water is a crucial element to punch, The most successful punches in a bowl I've made have had a final abv in the finished product of between 12% and 15%, so I think it's a good idea to get the pocket calculator out and figure out how much water to add. Not enough dilution and it's definitely going to have an interesting (and not necessarily desireable) effect on the party. The rules for punch are different than the rules for cocktails.

View Post


if i use simple syrup (deremera) in place of the confectioners, do i count that water in the calculation?

View Post


You can, though you're really going for a total volume thing. For the record, an ounce of 1:1 syrup contains about 2/3 oz of water, 2:1 syrup about 1/2 oz per oz of syrup.

If you're making an actual bowl-sized recipe, many old punch recipes call for the infusion of the sugar with some lemon peel oils, nowadays accomplished by peeling some of the lemons (minimize the amount of white part) and muddling them with the sugar. If you're starting with syrup you already have on hand of course you would probably have to skip this step.

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this sounds all great..love learning this stuff...

unfortunately i ran out of time in prep'ing for this stuff, so i had to use what i had on hand, which meant following the magazine's recipe..(i am the worst procrastinator)

I mad two versions, one with some OJ (fresh squeezed of course) with some lemon, and the other one, the other way 'round (taking ms loeb's suggestion above) i also made one with the sailor jerry despite someones mild protest...and one with gosling's 80...i had to add a bit more water than called for for both as they were both too hot at base recipe...

both are great..the gosling's is sharper and more tart (as it had more lemon) and the SJ was tame and a bit sweeter...even with my sampling it hit me a bit...

should be a good bbq..hope the guest appreciate it

I would like to in the future make this with the demerera syrup as i can sense exactly what it would bring to the party, and that level of taste is missing on the F&W recipe

thanks again for the suggestions

shany

#79 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 12:03 PM

Hope the party goes well, punch always helps. Just so you know, the mild protest was from Mr. Dave Wondrich, aka Splificator, probably the world's foremost expert on old-school drinking. His latest book, Imbibe! brought about a renewed interests in things like Punch and his next book is supposedly going to focus exclusively on Punch. If you haven't gotten a copy of his book (any of them, really), it is a must-have. His opinion on any drink recipe, particularly any recipe older than c. 1900, is not to be taken lightly.

That said I would imagine Sailor Jerry's makes an acceptable variation on Fish House Punch, though perhaps lacking somewhat in the richness of texture that comes from Jamaican-styled rums.

Edited by thirtyoneknots, 02 May 2009 - 12:03 PM.

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#80 shantytownbrown

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 12:31 PM

Hope the party goes well, punch always helps. Just so you know, the mild protest was from Mr. Dave Wondrich, aka Splificator, probably the world's foremost expert on old-school drinking. His latest book, Imbibe! brought about a renewed interests in things like Punch and his next book is supposedly going to focus exclusively on Punch. If you haven't gotten a copy of his book (any of them, really), it is a must-have. His opinion on any drink recipe, particularly any recipe older than c. 1900, is not to be taken lightly.

That said I would imagine Sailor Jerry's makes an acceptable variation on Fish House Punch, though perhaps lacking somewhat in the richness of texture that comes from Jamaican-styled rums.

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point well taken...i agree that BOTh variiations lack "richness" and a little mouth feel is missing as well...i think that the Gosling's is least lacking in both categories, and will play with this recipe over the summer months, i hope...and try different rums and different sugars...etc



i am hoping that my guests don't find both to be "too much" for their tastes...i hope not...of course..they are old school cocktail newbies...

shanty

#81 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 01:20 PM

i am hoping  that my guests don't find both to be "too much" for their tastes...i hope not...of course..they are old school cocktail newbies...

shanty

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In my experience, some people who are used to drinking vodka-ish things may be shocked initially at the amount of pure flavor in a drink like this, they are likely to describe it as "strong" in which they don't distinguish strong flavors from alcoholic potency. Usually I find if you can convince someone to tough out one cup of punch, by the end of it they want more. The nice thing about punches is that when made properly they have all the flavor of dark spirits with very little of the 'bite' that one often associates with them, making it a good gateway for neophytes. Next step is a Sidecar, before long they are hooked on Manhattans.

Oh well a boy can dream, can't he?
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#82 shantytownbrown

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 06:47 PM



i am hoping  that my guests don't find both to be "too much" for their tastes...i hope not...of course..they are old school cocktail newbies...

shanty

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In my experience, some people who are used to drinking vodka-ish things may be shocked initially at the amount of pure flavor in a drink like this, they are likely to describe it as "strong" in which they don't distinguish strong flavors from alcoholic potency. Usually I find if you can convince someone to tough out one cup of punch, by the end of it they want more. The nice thing about punches is that when made properly they have all the flavor of dark spirits with very little of the 'bite' that one often associates with them, making it a good gateway for neophytes. Next step is a Sidecar, before long they are hooked on Manhattans.

Oh well a boy can dream, can't he?

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well, I am home from the gathering, thanking myself for stopping the imbibing early enough, as i had to drive through a DUI stop (sober of couse as my wife and daughter were in the car)...

but the Philly fish House Punch(es) i made were a HUGE hit...everyone loved them, and loved both of them for different reasons...I am hoping that i will be able to have them over for sidecars before too long...

they loved hearing some of the history behind this and were not aware of the growing "old school" cocktail scene and wonder if i have sparked some interest..(???)(see, we are stuck in the rural 'burbs of CT here)

both couples want the formulas...! a good time was had by all...

I look forward to my next punch adventure

shanty

#83 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 10:32 PM

but the Philly fish House Punch(es) i made were a HUGE hit

...

I look forward to my next punch adventure

shanty

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Glad to hear it all went so well! Fish House Punch is hard to beat. If you can locate Batavia Arrack and Seville oranges, Regent's Punch is perhaps the best contender. Unfortunately those are both relatively scarce ingredients. Still worth trying with substitutions.

If you're interested in learning more about punch, definitely recommend you pick up a copy of the aforementioned Imbibe!, it'll have you clamoring for more (which is on the way).
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#84 shantytownbrown

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 04:59 AM


but the Philly fish House Punch(es) i made were a HUGE hit

...

I look forward to my next punch adventure

shanty

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Glad to hear it all went so well! Fish House Punch is hard to beat. If you can locate Batavia Arrack and Seville oranges, Regent's Punch is perhaps the best contender. Unfortunately those are both relatively scarce ingredients. Still worth trying with substitutions.

If you're interested in learning more about punch, definitely recommend you pick up a copy of the aforementioned Imbibe!, it'll have you clamoring for more (which is on the way).

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imbibe! is in my wish list cart on Amazon, will order soon...

Batavia Arrak is available and relatively common around my parts (not sure why in particular, but have seen it almost anywhere)..but Seville oranges, not so much...tho..supposedly there is a market in the town where i am moving that will order ANYTHING you need..so when i move this summer...a batch of regents will be made!

#85 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:10 AM

So my best friend since 6th grade is getting married next weekend and one of the other guys and I are naturally providing punch. Fish House Punch is almost de rigeur for parties around here by now, but I also like to try new ones and it just so happens that I have on hand all the ingredients for the Savannah Artillery Punch from Imbibe! (subbing some mild but funky Aussie rose for the Catawba). The question comes from the admonition that the "stock" for that punch should be aged...the question is how long? The recipe recommends two days at minimum but I was thinking of making it perhaps tomorrow to sit a whole week, refrigerated of course. My only concerns were a) fruit solids in the stock making it go 'off', and b) the lemon juice losing its acidity in the intervening week.

Does anyone have experience with aging punch like this? I know Mr. Kinsey has mentioned in passing several times that his family ages Fish House Punch for a long time (a year?). Is this with the lemon juice already included? What effect does this have on the acidity/balance? When I've done FHP in batches for parties or caterings I've always mixed everything a few days ahead except for the lemon juice and part of the water, juicing the lemons the day of.

I'm sure it'll be pretty good either way, I'm just looking for some insight here. Thanks in advance.
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#86 Splificator

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:26 AM

So my best friend since 6th grade is getting married next weekend and one of the other guys and I are naturally providing punch. Fish House Punch is almost de rigeur for parties around here by now, but I also like to try new ones and it just so happens that I have on hand all the ingredients for the Savannah Artillery Punch from Imbibe! (subbing some mild but funky Aussie rose for the Catawba). The question comes from the admonition that the "stock" for that punch should be aged...the question is how long? The recipe recommends two days at minimum but I was thinking of making it perhaps tomorrow to sit a whole week, refrigerated of course. My only concerns were a) fruit solids in the stock making it go 'off', and b) the lemon juice losing its acidity in the intervening week.

Does anyone have experience with aging punch like this? I know Mr. Kinsey has mentioned in passing several times that his family ages Fish House Punch for a long time (a year?). Is this with the lemon juice already included? What effect does this have on the acidity/balance? When I've done FHP in batches for parties or caterings I've always mixed everything a few days ahead except for the lemon juice and part of the water, juicing the lemons the day of.

I'm sure it'll be pretty good either way, I'm just looking for some insight here. Thanks in advance.

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You'll definitely have to strain out the lemon solids, which will turn a most unappetizing brown precipitate. You will, however, need a very large strainer for this. A good use for those high thread-count sheets you find just to fancy to sleep on.

And yes, the acidity declines as well, but in exchange you get a mellow richness that's pretty fine.
aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

#87 db_campbell

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 09:39 AM

So my best friend since 6th grade is getting married next weekend and one of the other guys and I are naturally providing punch. Fish House Punch is almost de rigeur for parties around here by now, but I also like to try new ones and it just so happens that I have on hand all the ingredients for the Savannah Artillery Punch from Imbibe! (subbing some mild but funky Aussie rose for the Catawba). The question comes from the admonition that the "stock" for that punch should be aged...the question is how long? The recipe recommends two days at minimum but I was thinking of making it perhaps tomorrow to sit a whole week, refrigerated of course. My only concerns were a) fruit solids in the stock making it go 'off', and b) the lemon juice losing its acidity in the intervening week.

Does anyone have experience with aging punch like this? I know Mr. Kinsey has mentioned in passing several times that his family ages Fish House Punch for a long time (a year?). Is this with the lemon juice already included? What effect does this have on the acidity/balance? When I've done FHP in batches for parties or caterings I've always mixed everything a few days ahead except for the lemon juice and part of the water, juicing the lemons the day of.

I'm sure it'll be pretty good either way, I'm just looking for some insight here. Thanks in advance.

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You'll definitely have to strain out the lemon solids, which will turn a most unappetizing brown precipitate. You will, however, need a very large strainer for this. A good use for those high thread-count sheets you find just to fancy to sleep on.

And yes, the acidity declines as well, but in exchange you get a mellow richness that's pretty fine.

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I've made two batches of Chatham now, and I generally institute a 3 month no-opening rule, which unfortunately does not conform to your purposes here. I also age it at room temp, albeit in a cool, dark place, lemon juice and all; no one's ever gotten sick off it (well, at least not for that reason).

Naturally, Prof. Wondrich is quite correct about the brownish lemon gunk. My only advice is to strain out as much pulp-mess as possible as you make it; you'll still have to re-strain later, but it makes the job a little easier.

#88 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 01:34 AM

Thanks for the insight gentlemen, I think I'll make the stuff tomorrow but it's nice to know that if for some reason this punch doesnt get consumed (long story but the schedule isn't even set in soap yet) then the stock will still be useful. I sort of intend to make a compromise/inclusive recipe, using both the liquor and fruit from some maraschino cherries I made a while back, as well as both the rye and strawberries. Together with lemon pulp and pineapple chunks, thats a lot of fruit solids--presumably not all of it is supposed to be strained out(?)

I doubt there is a residence in Texas that has a room cool enough to age punch in in August but I am glad to finally have a use for those sheets. And of course it's always a blast to try new kinds of punch... I've already got a wine here to use but I'm curious if anyone has found any source for authentic catawba, or failing that if there is any specific wine that works better than others. Just for future reference.
Andy Arrington

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#89 db_campbell

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Posted 01 August 2009 - 05:48 PM

I sort of intend to make a compromise/inclusive recipe, using both the liquor and fruit from some maraschino cherries I made a while back, as well as both the rye and strawberries. Together with lemon pulp and pineapple chunks, thats a lot of fruit solids--presumably not all of it is supposed to be strained out(?)

... I've already got a wine here to use but I'm curious if anyone has found any source for authentic catawba, or failing that if there is any specific wine that works better than others. Just for future reference.

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This is likely not the most authentic method, and Prof. Wondrich can correct it as he deigns, but what I did on my current batch was to add pineapple juice to the stock, then serve with pineapple chunks (plus cherries and orange slices). For the strawberries, I bought a quart, halved them, and macerated in the stock for 3-4 days before straining out. So the only solids I have in my stock are the lemon pulp-mess. Looking back, I probably should have macerated pineapple chunks alongside the strawberries, and eschewed the juice.

The New York mega-producer Taylor has a line of "Pink Catawba" that it generally seems to sell in magnums. I've seen it some in Florida, so perhaps your local wine/liquor store can order it? I'm not expecting anything from Taylor to be the best of its type, but at this point merely obtaining the varietal itself seems to be the primary objective.

#90 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 12:15 AM

Yeah I knew Taylor made a Catawba but I've never seen it for sale around these parts so I made do with a Yalumba Rose of Cabernet found on sale for $5/bottle. It's highly unexciting on it's own but seemed to work well so far in the punch...here's what I whipped up today, sort of taking the opportunity to make a hybrid recipe and use up some homemade stuff lying around. Quantities are halved from the original.

1 cup Turbinado sugar muddled with lemon peel (more than called for but I'm under the impression that Catawba would have more rs than the rose I used)
1 heaping tbs Apricot Green Tea steeped in a cup of water, used to dissolve the sugar.
2 quarts Yalumba Rose of Cabernet
2 cups Old Overholt (wanted to keep the wattage relatively modest)
4 oz Brugal Anejo
12 oz Mount Gay Eclipse (these stand in for "St. Croix Rum")
Juice of 14.5 lemons (about a pint of juice)
1 whole pineapple cut in chunks
little less than a pound of strawberries cored and diced
about a cup and a half of homemade maraschino cherries and their syrup

All of this nearly fills two huge gallon-sized jars. It is currently resting in the fridge...once the time comes this will probably fill my largest (12 qt) bowl all the way to the top, with ice block. Have two bottles of the excellent Francois Montand sparkler reserved for punch duty.

This stuff looks to be a serious crowd pleaser...and I'm very glad to have halved the recipe. More reports after this weekend.
Andy Arrington

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