Jump to content

Nyleve Baar

participating member
  • Content Count

    295
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://

Profile Information

  • Location
    Millbrook, Ontario

Recent Profile Visitors

2,325 profile views
  1. Darienne - I have been seeing sides of wild sockeye salmon at Peterborough Costco, alongside the farmed salmon fillets (evil evil evil) in the refrigerated fish case. They're either defrosted or still frozen, vacuum sealed. I bought a couple the other week and had one - it was very good, and a very good price. Will not purchase farmed salmon as my son is a fisheries biologist in Nova Scotia, working to somehow save the wild stocks which are not doing well. When I ask him how things look, he tells me that he will be a witness to the extinction of the Atlantic salmon in that province. Fish farms are part of the problem but, admittedly, not the entire problem.
  2. You can still get root parsley at supermarkets that have some "ethnic" stuff. It is a different thing than regular leaf - even plain leaf - parsley. There's a specific variety that grows a proper root, which is used in soup. My mother always used it in her chicken soup, and so do I if I happen to come across it. I suppose you can pull up a regular parsley and keep it root and all but it's not really meant to be used that way. Yes that photo above is cilantro.
  3. I have no idea about translucent or not. If it's sliced thinly, which you had not yet done in the picture, it may very well have been more translucent looking. It may also have something to do with the specific salmon piece. I really don't think it would make any difference in the final product.think your gravlax looks great and glad you pushed yourself to make it!
  4. Tic Tac - I've been to City FIsh many times but not recently and I've never had their smoked salmon. Next time I'm in that area I will pick some up for sure. It's near enough to Grande Cheese, which is where I sometimes stock up on Italian essentials. Thanks!
  5. No nuisance at all! Yeah if your guy doesn't like smoked salmon, he won't like this. Texture is similar - not cooked, just cured. Some people just can't deal with that. If you don't like the mustard sauce just eat it however you like it! I personally am not crazy about mustard but I do like the sauce - it's like a slightly mustardy mayo, but with no egg. Your photo looks good - when I make it, I slice very very thinly diagonally across the grain to serve. It's excellent on any good bread - baguette or thinly sliced grainy stuff. So glad it worked out for you (more or less). Happy Anniversary!
  6. You can absolutely leave out the dill. Use thyme if you like, or just leave it out altogether. Not a big deal. As for cutting it in half, I guess it would work. In that case I wouldn't bother trying to sandwich it together as in the recipe. Just wrap it all tightly in saran and weigh it down. Should turn out fine.
  7. Ok then! Here goes. Please let us all know how it turns out - and happy anniversary! Gravlax Two 1 lb. centre cut salmon fillets (with skin on one side, if possible) 1 tbsp. coarsely crushed peppercorns 1 tbsp. coarsely crushed coriander seeds 1 tsp. dry mustard 2 tbsp. coarse salt 2 tbsp. granulated sugar 1/4 cup vodka 1 bunch fresh dill, trimmed Place both pieces of salmon, skin-side-down, on a baking sheet or large platter. Combine peppercorns, coriander seeds, dry mustard, salt, and sugar. Press evenly on flesh side of both salmon fillets. Line a glass dish or baking pan with an excess of plastic wrap. It should hang over all the sides because you'll be using it to wrap the salmon in. Place one fillet, spice-side-up, in the plastic-lined pan. Sprinkle with half of the vodka. Lay dill sprigs in a heavy layer over it. Place the second fillet on top of the first, spice-side-down. Sprinkle with the rest of the vodka. Wrap the salmon as snugly as possible in the plastic wrap. Place a tray or plate over the salmon and weight it down with a few heavy cans or potatoes or a bag of oranges...whatever you've got handy. Refrigerate for at least 2 days, turning the salmon over so the juices are evenly distributed once or twice a day. That's pretty much it. You can let it go 3 days if you want but 2 days is enough - too long can dry out the salmon and make it tough. To serve, remove from the marinade, scrape away dill, and most of the seasonings. Slice very thinly and serve with mustard sauce (recipe follows). Leftovers will keep for a week or so, in the marinade. Mustard sauce 1/3 cup Dijon mustard 1 tsp. dry mustard 1/4 tsp. hot pepper sauce 2 tbsp. granulated sugar 2 tbsp. white wine vinegar (or cider vinegar) 1/3 cup olive oil 3 tbsp. finely chopped dill (I didn't use it) 2 tbsp. whipping cream In a small bowl, mix together the Dijon mustard, dry mustard, hot pepper sauce, sugar and vinegar. With a whisk, slowly beat in oil until it becomes mayonnaise-ish. (I used a mini food processor and it worked just fine.) Stir in the chopped dill and whipping cream.
  8. I've made gravlax many times - it's ridiculously easy. BUT the problem is getting good salmon is not so easy. I try to avoid farmed salmon if at all possible and that's what is mostly available, especially at this time of year. My son is a fisheries biologist working with salmon on the east coast and he has drilled into me how terrible the salmon farming industry is. I will occasionally by smoked salmon that I know is farmed but we don't talk about it. Haha.
  9. Peterborough Costco used to carry Nanuk brand smoked salmon which I thought was pretty good, but they've stopped selling it. They now only carry some kind of smoked steelhead, which I don't like. And they carry another brand of smoked salmon in the freezer - it comes in individually vacuum packed small packets. It's better than the steelhead and it's nice to be able to take out just enough for a serving or two without thawing the whole side of salmon. I've seen - but not tried - smoked wild sockeye at Superstore. They seem to have several different brands of smoked salmon - you might give one of those a shot. All frozen ones. If you should happen to end up in Toronto, I would recommend the smoked salmon from Central Epicure - they have an outlet near Steeles and Weston Road. They also do great smoked whitefish. It's in the middle of nowhere but not far off the 407 if you're up at that end of the city. I've also heard great things about Kristapsens (sp?) but have never had their smoked salmon so can't vouch personally.
  10. I may not have any use for it either. Well I do, but I have SO MANY dishes that I don't really need it. Might gift it to one of my sons. Whatever. I love finding these treasures.
  11. Nice Dansk baking dish from my local St. Vincent de Paul. $14. It baffled me because it's in mint condition, made in Indonesia and is not the more common Kobenstyle. But a little digging online suggests it may have been made in the 1970's when Dansk started producing in weird places.
  12. Thanks! I will look for these. Don't need or want clear - just fine with murky brown.
  13. Do you know what kind of extract your friend gets in Mexico? I'll be going there in about a week and am prepared to stock up if there's anything good available. Years ago I bought some vanilla on a trip to Mexico that was just awful, so I know it's not always easy to find the good stuff.
  14. My thought too. It seems a shame to drown it in a stronger flavour but not sure it has enough oomph to stand up on its own.
  15. When life gives you crabapples...and you don't want to make jelly...you make crabapple vodka! Basically just cut crabapples in half and steeped in vodka - probably nearly a month now. It smells delicious. Almost spicy - which is weird because the only thing in it is crabapples and vodka. I'd love some ideas for cocktails for next week's Canadian Thanksgiving. People?
×
×
  • Create New...