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Quality - Who Cares?


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#31 Edward J

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 01:55 PM

 

 

Yes, I am very familiar with that technique, having lived and worked in S'pore for over 6 years.

I hate it! (the technique, not the chicken or duck, that is...)

 

Both chicken and ducks are birds, and as such, have hollow bones.  In order to maximize the bird, the chop-ee chops straight down through the rib cage and through wing and leg bones with a heavy cleaver.  This results in a lot of bone splitters in the meat.  I hate it.  Char siew is a lot better under the chopping cleaver, but you can also use a cutting motion with the cleaver.  As for myself, I have portioned thousands of birds, both raw and cooked with a simple chef's knife, cutting through joints and not straight through the bone.

 

Also, if you look at the cutting boards, they are hollowed out, in some cases more than 3 0r 4 inches deep.  How such a large block is sanitized is unknown to me, but obviously it doesn't go through a commercial high-temp dishwasher



#32 dcarch

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 02:14 PM

Huiray, those are great videos. Thanks for posting. Cleaver is an amazing kitchen tool. In addition to the many cutting techniques shown on the videos, I have seen even more clever uses.

 

I would say 90% of the time I will be using my cleavers. 

 

Just yesterday, I had a whole salmon, I used the cleaver to chop the salmon into steaks. Today I had BBQ ribs. There are connecting soft bones between each rib, a cleaver just chopped right thru.

 

You do need a lower quality cleaver for hard chopping and a good quality one for slicing. A good quality cleaver is still very inexpensive.

 

dcarch



#33 huiray

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 09:37 AM

Yes, I am very familiar with that technique, having lived and worked in S'pore for over 6 years.

I hate it! (the technique, not the chicken or duck, that is...)

 

Both chicken and ducks are birds, and as such, have hollow bones.  In order to maximize the bird, the chop-ee chops straight down through the rib cage and through wing and leg bones with a heavy cleaver.  This results in a lot of bone splitters in the meat.  I hate it.  Char siew is a lot better under the chopping cleaver, but you can also use a cutting motion with the cleaver.  As for myself, I have portioned thousands of birds, both raw and cooked with a simple chef's knife, cutting through joints and not straight through the bone.

 

Also, if you look at the cutting boards, they are hollowed out, in some cases more than 3 0r 4 inches deep.  How such a large block is sanitized is unknown to me, but obviously it doesn't go through a commercial high-temp dishwasher

 

Well, Edward J, to each his or her own.  Your kitchen, your rules. 

 

It might be an idea, however, to consider that some kitchens and chefs may not agree with your opinions.  (When you stated "in the kitchen we cut with a knife" that implied ALL kitchens, because you offered no caveats)  Or lots of diners in those parts of the world.  For that matter, lots of people like sucking out the marrow from chicken and duck bones, and if presented with a dish like one of these Cantonese/Chinese roast chickens/ducks, where all bones were intact and cut only at the joints, they would be aggrieved.  I for one would be.  For that matter I can't say that I have ever encountered "a lot of bone splinters in the meat" in dishes of such things where they have been chopped up in the Chinese/E Asian/SE Asian style.  It's not zero fragments, but nowhere near "a lot".  Not even when I do it myself.  ;-)  As for eating around whatever splinters there are, I have no difficulty whatsoever doing so, and neither do millions of people in E/SE Asia. 



#34 Edward J

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 01:00 PM

Yup.

 

Each to his own.

 

Although I\d stick my neck out and wager that nobody likes the "experience" of having a bone splinter jammed in between your gum and tooth.

 

Don't get me wrong, I love bone marrow, and love sucking it out of bones , but not at the expense of removing bone fragments from my gum line....