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Dinner! 2013 (Part 2)


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#541 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 08:45 AM

Fairway has been selling fava beans for the past couple of weeks. Normally you'll not see fava beans until late May/early June at USGM, so I scored some to satisfy my craving until then.

last night:

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It's quite simple -- fry pancetta, guanciale or bacon, then add minced shallots and shelled fava beans. Deglaze with white wine, taste for salt and pepper, stir in some chives. Eat.

 

 

Those colours are so splendid, SobaAddict; I envy you your photography talents, and your broad beans.



#542 mm84321

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 01:38 PM

Suckling pig, sauce charcuterie 

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#543 huiray

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:22 PM

Just curious - do you (or other folks here) read or follow anyone else other than that Englishwoman Fuchsia Dunlop when it comes to Chinese cookery?  

huiray – I have other Chinese cookbooks, but cook almost exclusively from “that Englishwoman” for three reasons: the cookbooks cover Sichuan and Hunan (my favorites); the recipes are very well written; and the food has turned out wonderfully.  Do you have other recommendations for Sichuan/Hunan cookbooks?

 

OK. 

 

No, I don't have any particular recommendations for other Sichuan/Hunan cookbooks, largely because I don't normally like or cook Sichuan/Szechuanese or Hunanese dishes.  I prefer and largely cook Cantonese/Hakka and related cuisines, as you may have noticed if you look at the "Lunch" thread.  When I cook spicy or fiery dishes I gravitate to SE Asian/Nyonya or Southern Indian dishes.

 

I continue to find it interesting that so many folk in the US (and perhaps elsewhere too) seem to prefer Szechuanese/Hunanese food. Heh. 

 

...and yes, of course not all Szechuanese/Hunanese food is spicy or fiery. :-) 


Edited by huiray, 30 April 2013 - 03:01 PM.


#544 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:33 PM

I made:

Mushroom salad with parsley and white wine vinegar

Cucumber salad with mint and garlic

Cannelini bean puree with lemon juice and white onion (I used my home-made bay leaves)

Soda bread

=

Sandwich

 

Plus fruit salad with coconut yogurt

 

And I went mad with the camera.

 

 

 

 

 

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#545 SobaAddict70

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 08:53 PM

plantes -- thanks.  I like the fruit salad shot.
 
mm -- stunning as usual.
 
tonight:
 
leftovers mostly, but this was tonight's app:

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Creamed mushroom bruschetta, with caramelized onions

Recipe, courtesy of Chef Chris Pandel, from Balena (Chicago): http://www.nytimes.c...zed-Onions.html

 

even by scaling down Chef Pandel's recipe, it's quite rich.  must've gained like 2-3 lbs. just from eating it.  also, the version pictured above has some chantrelles as well (not as much though, as I had some scraps that needed to be used before they turned).


Edited by SobaAddict70, 30 April 2013 - 08:55 PM.


#546 Keith_W

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:12 AM

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Two portions of beautiful line caught wild barramundi.

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Panfried barramundi with mashed potato on a light ginger broth with autumn vegetables. The mash was piped on to the barramundi then finished in the oven. The chilli looking things are baby capsicum - I chose those colours because that's what the tree in my backyard looks like. It's autumn here in Australia.
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#547 C. sapidus

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:10 PM

Keith – Purty fish! I have never tried barramundi.

 

Plantes – You should go mad with the camera more often

 

huiray – I do enjoy Nyonya cooking.

 

Mexican tonight:

 

Pescado al mojo de ajo: Mahi mahi marinated with lime and pulverized garlic, dredged in flour (cayenne, pepper, salt), pan-fried, and then topped with a sauce of butter-fried garlic, parsley, and lime juice. Younger son made a fish taco with his.

 

Chayote al vapor: Chayote, minced chiles, salt, and cilantro, topped with feta cheese. One of my long-time favorites.

 

Platanos fritos: Still working through a Costco-sized box of plantains.

 

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#548 patrickamory

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:52 PM

Bruce thanks for the tip on Tiger skin peppers. Bookmarked!

 

huiray I think the reason people love Fuchsia Dunlop is that she's a great food writer & researcher - her memoir about learning to cook in Sichuan Province in the '90s is fascinating, one of the best food books of the last 10 years. Hunanese and Sichuan cuisine are popular right now perhaps partly because of her, also because some very good restaurants presenting the food of these regions have opened up in major American cities and London recently, as I'm sure you're aware.

 

Personally, I love Cantonese cuisine and I wish I knew books as good as Dunlop's on the subject. Is the Teresa M. Chen book comparable? Not just a collection of good recipes, but an authoritative presentation of the cooking, the region, its history, and the foodways? 

 

There are so few cookbooks in that league from any cuisine.

 

I do have the Grace Young cookbook on wok cookery, which is more oriented toward other regions of China and especially Guangzhou/Hong Kong, but it is (a) primarily a book on technique (and a very good one) and (b) somewhat hyphenated-American, not that that's a bad thing in itself of course.

 

My Taiwanese in-laws come from a country with incredible food, some say the best in China. But they almost never cook at home, and if they do, it's only braises. I've tried to convince them that it's possible to do decent wok cookery on a home stove - even if you're not going to achieve true wok hei - but it's like arguing with a wall. I sense that the restaurant and street food available 24 hours a day in Taipei is so incredible that they don't see the point of bothering.

 

Anyway, thread jack! Sorry to go off on a tangent here... this probably belongs in the Chinese eats thread anyway.



#549 patrickamory

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 08:57 PM

Chicken Chettinad:

 

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#550 huiray

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 02:56 AM

Patrickamory, nah - I (personally) would not consider what you posted as a thread jack. I'd like to think it's fine here. I also think one ought not to shove anything and everything "ethnic" into the "ethnic" threads.  That's a kind of over-compartmentalization and even faintly discriminatory, no? :-)

 

I think the Theresa M. Chen book is nice - but note that it focuses on Cantonese SOUPS and does not go into the full panoply of the cuisine. It's not written as an extensive personal & historical memoir, though, in the way Dunlop did. There are sections about the author's journey (personal & foodwise) from the SF Bay Area [this book *is* written from the perspective of "looking back" at the "Old Country" from N. America], the journeys/biographies and recollections (and heretofore unwritten family recipes) of the old-timers and many others she sat down with and talked to, some stuff about the Pearl River Delta versus the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (with a few historical tid-bits), that sort of thing...then there are sections on Traditional Cantonese/Chinese soups and the principles behind them; lots of stuff about techniques, yes; more than 50 pages on ingredients w/ pictures and the Chinese characters for them (Chinese names for the soups and etc are also given throughout)...etc etc...plus three interesting forewords by Martin Yan, Doreen Leung and Esther Yip Chan.  Oh, there are lots of recipes for soups too, of course. :-)   Look it up on Amazon - you can see a fair bit of it using the "Look Inside!" feature.  OK, any more than this I suppose would count as a threadjack - from the "Cookbooks" threads this time. :-)

 

Your Chicken Chettinad - looks tasty. :-)  I presume that is powdered coriander and cumin I see? Plus other stuff? Plus powdered chilli or did you supply the heat with just the fresh chillies depicted?  In Tamil Nadu if you had a bowl of this one might be at danger of losing the mucosal lining of your mouth (and throat) if not used to it...  :-D  I make a form of this too, with a personal simplified/ad hoc recipe rather than one from a cookbook and also dial down the Scoville units some!  (I'm not a chilihead :-) )


Edited by huiray, 02 May 2013 - 03:55 AM.


#551 SobaAddict70

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 04:01 AM

so there was an article that appeared recently in the Times, with Michael Pollan and Michael Moss (he's the guy who coined the term 'pink slime') on the decline of cooking in America.  you can read it here:  http://www.nytimes.c...s.html?hpw&_r=0
 
mostly leftovers tonight, but there was this to start first:

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Ramp and cheese omelette (ramps, unsalted butter, eggs, sea salt, black pepper and 2 tablespoons grated pecorino romano cheese)

I didn't begin cooking until 9:43 pm -- had to wash the dishes in the sink first. Finished at 9:54 pm, so 11 minutes. If you're telling me that you can't wait 11 minutes to make something to eat, you're hopeless as far as being a member of Homo sapiens is concerned, in my opinion.

I don't mean to sound sanctimonious or self-righteous, but it really annoys me when I hear people say "cooking is too difficult, takes too long, or is too complicated, so why bother?" or "it's quicker to do takeout". Well, I do takeout too occasionally, but I don't lean on that as a crutch the majority of the time. That people have been taught to think of cooking as something not worth their effort is worrisome to me. Going to a McDonald's is actually slower than making an omelette, in this specific instance -- it's 3 blocks away from my apartment so getting there would take about 10-15 minutes depending on how fast I'm walking.

Edited by SobaAddict70, 02 May 2013 - 04:03 AM.


#552 Keith_W

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 05:23 AM

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Dinner tonight was turkey breast with potato puree on white chicken jus.

Turkey breast: injected with a brine made from milk and apple juice, then rested for 12 hours. Sous-vide for 2 hours as per Modernist Cuisine at Home.

Potato puree: potato starch retrograded at 72C, then boiled for 20 minutes and passed through a tamis twice on butter and milk.

White chicken jus: equal parts chicken wings and thighs and made in the pressure cooker for 90 minutes. (I cheated - I did not prepare this tonight. I always have some in the freezer).

Carrots: sous-vide for 60 minutes at 85C.

Broccolini: blanched for 4 minutes then refreshed in cold water.

Brussel sprout leaves: blanched for 45 seconds then refreshed in cold water.
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#553 sigma

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 06:52 AM

Wow Keith, I've never even thought of making a white jus.  Very creative.  How did you come up with that?



#554 Keith_W

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:54 AM

sigma, I didn't. The white chicken jus was from MC@Home. I should have attributed it in my post ... sorry!
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#555 patrickamory

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 08:00 AM

huiray thanks for the info on the book. I'm definitely going to check it out. The dried spice in that bowl is entirely powdered red chile. Cumin and coriander only make an appearance via garam masala. The spice mix is most dominated by deeply toasted powdered white poppy seeds. It was fiery.



#556 basquecook

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 08:30 AM

Fried oyster sandwiches last night.  Coated the oysters with a little bit of polenta in addition to a fine corn flour.  It added a nice crunch, almost like a falafel type fried oyster.  It allowed the oyster to really be present among the slaw and bun. I may have added a deep fried Chinese Sausage to mine. 

 

Drink and eating, does not make for fancy plating or good photography! 

 

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Neither does hipstamatic. 

 

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Made a version of a crawfish boil.  A take on the Hot N Juicy Crawfish and Boiling Crabs of the world.  Stock used crab boil, cayenne, beer, celery, onion, chives, ginger, soy sauce, butter, a boat load of garlic, white pepper, green pepper, black pepper and bay leaves.. Let that cook for a couple of hours.. Cooked potatoes in the broth and removed, then added these little Chinese Sausages, 3lbs of crawfish, a pound of head on shrimp, green beans and then the cooked potatoes.  

 

It was pretty damn good.


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Edited by basquecook, 02 May 2013 - 08:32 AM.

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#557 mm84321

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 09:49 PM

Wow Keith, I've never even thought of making a white jus.  Very creative.  How did you come up with that?

 

I'm as intrigued as you!



#558 basquecook

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 05:51 AM

Unexpected guests came over last night.  What to do, serve them leftovers.  

 

I figured since the crawfish were alive the day before, why not. 

 

We made a salad:

 

Rye Toast, herbs from the garden, lettuces, radish, egg, blue cheese, pickled pepper.  Simple dressing

 

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Served the same thing over rice.  Added a different sausage and threw in new beans.  Gave the broth a squeeze of sour orange to brighten. 


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Defrosted a berkshire pork chop and was going to serve with deep fried brussel sprouts in a sriracha honey dressing but, a las, there was too much food.  Vacuum sealed the porkchop and put back into the fridge. Served the sprouts.

 

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Edited by basquecook, 03 May 2013 - 05:52 AM.

“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK


#559 Keith_W

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 06:05 AM

I'm as intrigued as you!

I did say in an earlier post that I can not take the credit for the white chicken jus. I stole the idea from MC@H.  
 

Fried oyster sandwiches last night.  Coated the oysters with a little bit of polenta in addition to a fine corn flour.  It added a nice crunch, almost like a falafel type fried oyster.  It allowed the oyster to really be present among the slaw and bun. I may have added a deep fried Chinese Sausage to mine.

Wow, wow, and just wow! I can just imagine the crunch of the crust giving way to the tender oyster inside and served in a soft bun. It sounds so good, I am totally going to try that! Hmm, I might put some Nori flakes through the crust and make a sweet chilli mayo to go with it. I'm feeling hungry dreaming about it already, and I just ate!
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#560 basquecook

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 06:23 AM

Ha! Nori sounds like a really nice idea.  Or maybe like nori strips in the slaw.   They were really lovely.  Looking forward to reading about your efforts.


“I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted" JK


#561 pastameshugana

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 10:31 AM

Last night was a rare completely free night for us - so it was 'family cooking breakfast for dinner' night.

 

Oldest son (11) and youngest daughter (3) made pancakes with peanuts, peanut butter and knows what else. They were great.

 

Myself and 2nd son (9) did bacon and scrambled eggs with garlic-chile sauce.

 

Mrs Meshugana and Oldest daughter (9) attempted fresh OJ but these wretched oranges only gave up about 8oz of liquid for 6 whole fruit... ;)

 

Youngest son (17 months) did us all a favor and slept through the whole thing!

 

Topped off with peppermint hot cocoa and early to bed - hooray for time alone with mom! ;)


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#562 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 12:13 PM

I've been on a shrimp kick lately, when I actually bother to make something more substantial than a sandwich, some crackers, or a bowl of ramen noodles, or a reheated bowl of something I found at the back of the fridge (too much work lately, not enough time for cooking for myself!) - those are things I'd rather not show you, because I'm kind of ashamed of them....

 

Camarones Al Ajillo

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Shrimp in Mushroom Cream Sauce, with beef tenderloin in a brandy reduction

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Shrimp pizza

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#563 Morkai

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 12:39 PM

Finally make Prawncracker's miso sesame sauce today! Really delicious, sweet and nutty. Cannot wait for meat tomorrow. So I use some leftover sourdough to make a veggie pizza, using that miso sauce. How can I say that.... I planned to add some cilantro on top.  But I cannot wait after it came out from the oven....

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I feel so guilty to eat the whole one for dinner......

 

I would love to make this sauce. Did Prawncrackers post it?



#564 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 05:38 PM

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Paella w/ prawns and gummy shark. The rice didn't quite absorb all the stock. It wasn't soupy but at the same time it didn't end up with that nice crust you associate w/ paella. Next time I'll use my over enthusiastic gas stove again. I used my portable induction cooktop this time and found that the liquid evaporated in the centre of the pan but not around the edges. I'm also thinking I'll cook the prawns some other way (grill them, sous vide them, whatever seems like a good idea at the time) and add them later on. With such a small pan it's easy for a fairly small quantity of ingredients to crowd the pan.


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#565 Mr Holloway

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 02:04 PM

After seeing SobaAddict70 Creamed mushroom bruschetta(Thanks for including the recipe), had to give it a try.

It did not disappoint. The Big Green Egg adds a hint of smoke which really worked

The shrooms

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Onions cooking

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Very tasty

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 Shane



#566 Dejah

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 04:57 PM

Been holidaying with friends in Malaysia since April 4th - enjoying lots of Malaysian home cooking kampong style! Our friends are Muslim, and we've enjoyed lots of fresh fish, shrimp (their home is in northern Kadah state, close to fishing village), chicken, beef, veg, nasi lamak, roti jalal, etc. Great stuff! I'm missing my kitchen but had an opportunity to cook Chinese food for 27 family members just before we left!

 

Kinda sorry I checked in on this thread as I now really want to get back to cooking. :laugh:

 

We are now on a 14-day tour in China until mid-May. Not much planned in terms of food-quests, but we hope the guide will suggest some good eating for us. We are in Beijing until next Wed. Then it's off to Shanghai, Hangzhou, Souzhou, Wuxi, and Xi'an before heading home to Canada.

 

We did go to an interesting local restaurant in the hutong area yesterday. The atmosphere was colourful and loud, as a Chinese restaurant should be! Most of the patrons were eating noodles, but we had Spicy lamb chops (crispy, fatty, cumin-flavour dominant, and just enough heat), and bitter gourd stir-fried with lily bulb and garlic.


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#567 SobaAddict70

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 07:12 PM

basque -- nice pix as usual.

keith -- that is a lovely hunk of fish.

c. sapidus -- you have plantains! i'm envious.

patrick -- how was it?

panaderia -- shrimp pizza is new to me. looks great!

chris -- gummy shark?

shane -- glad that you enjoyed it. it's a very rich dish that should ideally be made for more than one person. there is a reason why i don't like cream-sauce based dishes.

dejah -- looking forward to hearing all about it when you get back.

for tonight, three courses. the first two are vegan, the third is vegetarian. i might cook again later tonight, depending on how peckish i feel.

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spring greens salad with yu choi flowers

salad: baby arugula, claytonia (better known as "miner's lettuce" or "winter purslane"), yu choi flowers, chickweed

the dressing: 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar, 2 teaspoons white wine (a dry white wine like a Basque txakoli will work wonders here), 3 tablespoons hazelnut oil, sea salt and black pepper to taste. whisk all liquid ingredients together, then taste for salt and pepper.

salad-making is a lost art that needs to come back.

next:

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fava greens with sweet and spicy ramps

fava greens are the leaves from a fava bean plant. they have a delicate texture and a flavor reminiscent of spinach but without the "bite". these were sautéed with ramps, olive oil, crushed red pepper flakes, chopped pistachios, crystallized ginger, shallots, dried cranberries and leftover dressing from the salad.

finally:

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"asparagus and potatoes" -- homemade sea salt-and-sherry vinegar heirloom potato chips, asparagus, hard-cooked farm egg and winter purslane.

the potato chips sound complicated, but are really nothing more than potatoes that were sliced by hand (skin on), then fried in olive oil, drained and seasoned with sea salt and sherry vinegar.

there's a light dressing of white wine vinegar and olive oil.



#568 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 07:24 PM

chris -- gummy shark?
 

 

Gummy shark, often sold as 'flake' in the state of Victoria, has the nicest meat of any shark. It's the only shark you'll find easily at a fishmongers. That said, you'll sometimes spot the flesh of other kinds of sharks: school sharks, elephant fish. Typically those are inexpensive compared to gummy shark as they are vastly inferior. Unless you specifically ask for something else, gummy shark is what you'll get when you buy fish and chips in Victoria (in other states I think they use something else). It's a white-fleshed fish with a sweet, mild flavour.


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 04 May 2013 - 07:25 PM.

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#569 TinaYuan

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 03:52 PM

Morkai, YES! Below is quoted from Prawncrackers:"

 

Of course I've been having it with grilled pork chops and beef. I retro-engineered it from one I had in a steak restaurant in Fukuoka. It should be mixed with freshly ground toasted sesame before dipping your meat into it. In the restaurant we each had a small bowl with grooves etched into it called a suribachi. The sesame seeds are ground in this before the sauce is added. The combination of the sweet deeply savoury and deep nuttiness of the sesame is simply sublime:


200ml ichiban dashi made from katsuobushi and kombu
100g brown miso
120g mirin
75g sugar
50g rice wine vinegar
Simmer the above for 15 minutes then add a teaspoon of finely grated ginger and simmer for another 5 minutes. Take off the heat and stir in one tablespoon of yuzu juice (or a mixture of lime and Seville orange). The sauce will keep for a while in the fridge.

"


Life is beautiful.

#570 TinaYuan

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Posted 05 May 2013 - 04:03 PM

SobaAddict70, I love all the greens. Your dishes smell like spring! Fava beans are one of my favorites.  I found some in farmers' market this weekend but they are too old. The most delicious fava beans I have ever had are from my grandparents' garden. We picked them and cooked immediately, only with some chives and s&p. Oh, I'm homesick now.


Life is beautiful.