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adrianvm

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  1. I think the pistachio butters I used were roasted. One issue in general with roasted nuts is that there is a tendency I've noticed for nuts to be over-roasted. It's pretty much impossible to get roasted hazelnuts that aren't roasted to death, and some of the Italian hazelnut butters I tried were the worst offenders. I think my preference would be for the nuts to be lightly roasted.
  2. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    Of course I can't use glucose (dextrose) in a sugar-free ice cream. Erythritol crystallization is actually a major problem in general. I don't understand the chemistry, but that stuff really likes to form crystals. I developed a sugar free lemon bar recipe and even without a huge amount of erythritol it was prone to crystallizing out in a day or two, resulting in crunchy bars. I tried adding fructo-oligosaccharides and that seemed to help. But when I used polydextrose in ice cream with erythritol it didn't seem to make it softer. Certainly not the way glycerin does.
  3. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    That was an interesting read. I wonder if there are other things that would inhibit erythritol crystallization. Note for clarification, the article said that adding a sugar alcohol (they listed xylitol, sorbitol and maltitol) would inhibit crystallization. The sucralose is added for sweetness and the polydextrose to "[add] bulk and ... creamy sensory attributes".
  4. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    Well, I can tell you from my experience with making ice cream that if you replace sucrose with erythritol (a sugar alcohol with molecular weight 122) it transforms a soft ice cream into one that freezes rock hard, like ice cubes. So that seems to contradict your theory.
  5. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I have no idea how I started with 162g of water, removed 15% and arrived at 18g. And it's been a couple years, so I really don't recall what I was doing. I think the original recipe of 2 parts cream and 1 part milk is fairly conventional. Note that allulose and bochasweet (pentose) are both small molecules. The pentose with a molecular mass of 150 is even smaller than fructose at 180. So it's no surprise that they are effective at softening ice cream.
  6. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I have found that if you use allulose or bochasweet it gives a soft ice cream as well.
  7. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I sampled the ice cream yesterday evening. It was quite soft. I tried it again this morning and it's harder, but still easily scoopable. It's probably softer than it needs to be. However, there's an issue. It has a terrible texture. It's not smooth. The texture is kind of grainy. I'm not sure if it's ice crystals or something else---I suspect it might be something else. But that's definitely not very encouraging.
  8. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I went ahead and made this following the extended cooking procedure (even though paulraphael thinks it's mixing up variables). I used the formula I listed where the milk is replaced by casein protein, whey protein, water and the 67g erythritol. I froze it this morning and I'm pretty sure it's going to be scoopable, because it was almost soupy after it was frozen (at 16 deg F). In fact, I predict that it's going to be unnecessarily soft. I did find that the sweetener combination seems to bother the back of my throat, so I don't know if I'd say this is an acceptable final recipe. Why is this formula soft? Is it simply that the quantities of sugar-like substances (xylitol, erythritol and polydextrose) suffice to replace the sugar and lower the freezing point? Or does it have something to do with protein?. It seems like the next step would be to eliminate the long cooking step and see what happens. That's a pretty annoying step. The recipe would need to be adjusted to account for the water loss in cooking. For my recipe it's easy enough to remove 15% of the weight in water. That leaves only 18 g water remaining, which actually also makes it obvious that this recipe is unusually high in fat. It's got the fat and milk solids without the accompanying water. (I have assumed you used heavy cream, 36% fat.) It looks like if you want to do this using without protein powders then you would use 520 g heavy cream, 20 g whole milk and 14.5 g powdered milk to replace the milk and cream. (You'd add this to your already existing powdered milk quantity.)
  9. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    How could the extended cooking method affect scoopability? It seems like it could potentially affect texture and mouthfeel, but I don't see how it could affect scoopability. The reason for the extended heating appears to be "to promote...protein denaturation, which contributes to texture." I have never tried this method. I'm thinking may be I should try a preparation using whey and casein protein to replace the milk and milk powder. Did you use 36% cream and whole milk? Under this assumption I get the following formula 522 g cream 80 g egg yolks 162 g water 28 g casein protein 7 g whey protein 70 g xylitol 30 g polydextrose 5 g erythritol Then I need to replace 52g lactose and 15g splenda with something else. I could use 67 g erythritol.
  10. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    That's an interesting result. Did you omit the Trim Happy Mama sweetener the second time around? It's not totally clear what your final formula was. I generally prefer adding stevia separately from my other sweeteners instead of using a blend. It seems like your results are a bit different from mine. I didn't find the Poly D was making a huge difference. I wonder if the xylitol (which I haven't tried) is important. (Xylitol has a small effect on blood sugar, so I haven't used it.) Another observation is that you've got 34g of sugar in your recipe in the milk and powdered milk. I wonder what role that is playing. I was trying to avoid milk to keep all the sugars down.
  11. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I don't use Splenda, but it is a mixture of sucralose and a bulking agent, looks like often maltodextrin. In particular, if it's maltodextrin, then it's probably very fluffy, so you're not adding enough weight of the product to lower the freezing point significantly. It's a similar problem to the one I face if I use 1/8 tsp of stevia concentrate. I think there may be a role for stabilizers, but they're not the key to success.
  12. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I repeated the recipe above but reduced the glycerin to 1/3 the amount: 2 tsp. I was doing 4 things at once in the kitchen and neglected to make good measurements, but the density of a cup of the finished ice cream was around 6 oz / cup, which is a teeny bit lighter than what I got above. The resulting ice cream has been chilling for 18 hours and is still easily scoopable directly out of the freezer.
  13. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    To investigate the effect of batch size on overrun I made a full batch of the same recipe I tested previously, 2 cups cream, 1 cup water, 16 g whey protein, 6 egg yolks, 1/4 cup erythritol, 2 T glycerin, 3/32 tsp KAL stevia powder. I cooked it, cooled it to 40 F, and churned it in my machine. Residence time was 18 minutes, so three times longer than a half-batch. Overrun was 38%, so double a half batch. The pre-churn density was 8.4 oz / cup, which is higher than my measurement last time of 8 oz / cup the last time. Not sure what to make of that. The resulting ice cream is very soft. It also melts very quickly. Another observation is that it seems to have a icy / watery feel...though it doesn't seem to be coarse. I'm not sure how to describe it. I'm wonder this is a result of decreased total solids because of the sugar reduction. Because it is softer than necessary I think the amount of glycerin needs to be reduced.
  14. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I revisited the recipe that had the whipped cream. It called for 3/8 cup half and half, 3 egg yolks, 25 g erythritol, 25 g polydextrose, cooked into a custard. Then you fold in 3 whipped egg whites and 1.5 cups of cream, whipped. I tried to determine the overrun, and had some difficulty. I estimated the density of my initial mix at 8.9 oz / cup, which seems too high. The measured density after churning was 4.6 oz / cup. If I trust those numbers the overrun is 93%. If I assume it was more like 8.2 oz / cup before churning then the overrun is 78%. The resulting ice cream is easily scoopable out of the freezer, but not as soft as the ice cream containing the glycerin from the previous test. It also has an odd hard feel in the mouth despite being scoopable. So it seems that I can increase overrun quite high through this method of incorporating whipped eggs and cream, but this alone doesn't give a satisfactory texture.
  15. adrianvm

    Sugar-free ice cream

    I think the guy at icecreamscience does say that longer residence time gives higher overrun. I hadn't thought that just using a mixer would create a stable enough foam to keep air incorporated. I didn't think you could get a stable foam with a fat content lower than heavy cream (36%). Does anybody have insight? I wonder if the stabilizers would help the mix retain air. I made a recipe that was prepared in a blender, with the blender running for several minutes, and it didn't seem to have a lot of incorporated air---but it was a weird recipe with butter instead of cream. I was thinking about folding in whipped cream---but not whipping all of the cream. I want to revisit the recipe I made before with the whipped cream---figure out what its overrun is and decide what I think of its texture. Of course, another phenomenon there was that the whipping of the cream made the volume of the mix much larger and may have increased residence time. (Air is an insulator.) I was looking that recipe over and noticed that it calls for 1 tsp low-sugar pectin. What, if anything, might this do? It's a custard style mix that gets heated to 180. (Normally pi I sampled the ice creams after about 24 hours of hardening in the freezer. The ice cream with the glycerin was soft and scoopable straight from the freezer. The ice cream with the cremodan was much harder. The ice cream was in a thin layer and I was able to break off some pieces with a spoon and after ten minutes at room temperature it was soft enough to eat. This made me wish I had a control with no special ingredients added, because I feel like even that result was somewhat softer than I would have gotten with no additives. Certainly in the past I've had batches (with different formulation) that needed to warm up for 30 minutes so I could cut them with a chef's knife into portions. The need to heat the ice cream mix to 186 seems like a significant limitation of the cremodan. I detected a slight iciness in the cremodan treated product as well. I suspect this may have been due to the time I spent measuring overrun (after churning and before hardening) during which the ice cream melted slightly. (However, it doesn't demonstrate great powers of ice crystal suppression from the stabilizers, which are supposed to keep ice crystals from growing during such abuse in the frost-free freezer.) So glycerin seems like a great option assuming that its metabolic impact is acceptable (which I still don't know). Cremodan may have helped, but without a control I can't tell for sure, and it didn't help enough by itself. But perhaps combined with increased overrun the result might be good. Because overrun wasn't controlled I can't isolate the effect of the additives in my study---was the glycerin treated product softer because of the glycerin, or because it had 3.6 times more air incorporated? I was wondering what the right amount of overrun is so I took a look at the Cooks Illustrated review of commercial ice creams where they list overrun, and found that their two top picks (Ben and Jerry's and Haagen Dazs) have about 25% overrun. It's interesting to note that almost every other product on their list has 95% overrun---and I think I read somewhere that the legal maximum is 100%, so clearly the other brands are all pushing the limit.
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