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The Soup Topic (2013–)


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#61 rotuts

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 01:49 PM

Spanish garbanzo soup with smoked paprika and spanish chorizo



#62 Hassouni

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 02:08 PM

Southeast Asian noodle soups, hakata-style ramen, Arab/Turkish style lentil soup, and the mack daddy of all Iraqi soups - shorbat hamudh shalgham - a tomato based soup thickened with soaked pounded rice, with swiss chard, turnips, chickpeas, and a special kind of spherical kubba, eaten only in that soup.

 

Hmmm...what kind of pork bones are used for the broth for the hakata style ramen, do you know?

 

Kenji did a Food Lab feature on it here: http://www.seriousea...ome-recipe.html



#63 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 04:11 PM

Minestrone:

 

 

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#64 furzzy

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 09:07 PM

Just made a couple of days ago:

Garbanzos (dried - canned would probably be okay), chorizo, ham, onion, garlic, grated carrots, diced tomatoes w/seeds & juice, chicken stock, a bit of tomato paste (love the tube), annato, cumin, lemon juice, lime juice, Tabasco, s&p, red pepper flakes. I think that's it. Of course, seasonings are very individual - so choose your own. We have a divided household, so I have to split some off for myself, then put cilantro into the part that will be for my spouse. Mine gets parsley.

#65 mgaretz

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:51 PM

Split pea with ham and carrots (pressure cooker)
Sweet and sour cabbage borscht (slow cooker)
Beef barley mushroom
Chicken vegetable with noodles
War wonton

#66 Broken English

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 02:03 AM

I can't think of one to beat a properly made, rich french onion topped with sourdough and lots of gruyere.
James.

#67 dcarch

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 04:22 AM

Wensi Tofu soup, soup for an Emperor.

 

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#68 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 05:42 AM

Turkey meatball soup, southwest US style, based on a recipe from Huntley Dent. The ground turkey meatballs are flavored with jalapeno, cumin and garlic, then poached in a turkey broth. Add to the broth rice, chick peas and grated zucchini. Cilantro at the table for those who want to add it.

#69 annachan

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 05:59 AM

I often make some very simple blended soups. Veg, stock and minimal seasonings. Jerusalem artichoke is great for that. Carrot, butternut squash, pumpkin (add some onion when I have it on hand) is good with curry and/or cumin.

When I have time, I like Chinese soups. I always start with a pork bone based stock, using a variety of bones - neck, marrow, tails, etc. I sometimes add chicken parts - wing tips are my favorite. Once the stock is done, I then add a variety of things. One favorite combination is watercress, along with some dried duck gizzard, dried date and some apricot kernels. Also love the combination of dried and fresh bok choy. Red and "green" carrot (more like a green daikon) makes a sweet, refreshing soup. Then there is lotus root + dried squid.

And I also have a good corn soup/chowder. The easiest form is creamed corn + stock + egg flower.

#70 lindag

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 07:08 AM

My Mother used to make a wonderful soup made with spare ribs, cabbage, potatoes and the other usual aromatics.  I think it's an old Pennsylvania Dutch recipe.  I make it now, trying to recreate hers as closely as possible.



#71 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:20 AM

Locro de Queso, all the way!  This is a thick potato and stock soup with fresh cheese and avocado, and popcorn.

 

My recipe for this is in the excellent Monsoons thread, along with a recipe for one of my other favourite hearty soups, Fanesca.


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#72 huiray

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:29 AM

I like soups.  

 

There are too many I like to definitively name my "favorite soup".  I come from a soup-drinking culture (Cantonese; even though my mother is Hakka).  It seems just slightly odd when I have a meal without a soup of some kind, even if it is just a "kwun tong".  Still, if you twisted my arm but agreed to limit a choice to a "readily prepared with  minimal fuss everyday-type-of-soup" then I would say some form of HARM CHOY TONG (See here and here and here and here for examples - these are not definitive; and here for the sort of "pickled sour mustard" the sour mustard is. I know I'm missing posts where I described other variations of this.  

 

What I don't generally care for too much are the sort of cheesy, thickened Western-type soups, with a few exceptions.  Thickened cream-types can be OK, such as cream of mushroom if it has additional mushrooms in it and so on.  Broccoli & cheddar/cheese and its ilk is one type which I would not choose willingly.  Most soups I prefer would be in the "broth-like" or "liquid-with-solids" types, which many Cantonese-types would be like (Duh).  In contrast, something like "West Lake Soup" would be a type I disfavor, and this class would include overly-thickened Shark's Fin soup which would be a bad rendition anyway.  

 

Just in case you think I like only Chinese soups, I like lots of Western-cuisine soups - they just need to be relatively light, flavorful, clear in taste profile and not overly heavy or cheesy.  (A clear, purely liquid (no solids) classically-prepared consommé intense in its flavor would be a wondrous thing)  For that matter, when I am in the mood the classic Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup (from the can, with the requisite one can of water added) is *just perfect*. ;-) 


Edited by huiray, 26 May 2013 - 09:02 AM.

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#73 Tri2Cook

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:41 AM

Mom's beef vegetable. There was nothing unusual or fancy about it, it was just good. I've tried recreating it without ever getting it exactly right. There was no recipe but I watched her make it many times... maybe it's just in my head that I can't get it right. :biggrin:


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#74 naguere

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:40 AM

snert.jpg

 

 

For me it has to be Dutch Split Pea soup or :Erwtensoep (Dutch pea soup), it is good on the first day, and better on the second.

 

you can Google a receipt, but I would go for the Brabant method.

(Why is this soup known as 'Snert ?' :)


Edited by naguere, 26 May 2013 - 09:41 AM.

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#75 heidih

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:56 AM

Mom's beef vegetable. There was nothing unusual or fancy about it, it was just good. I've tried recreating it without ever getting it exactly right. There was no recipe but I watched her make it many times... maybe it's just in my head that I can't get it right. :biggrin:

 

'Thanks for reminding me about my Mom's vegetable soup. Hers was a very light roux (Einbrenn) with finely minced onion sprinkled in with the flour and corn oil as the fat and just water as the liquid. There had to be some paprika since it had a faint red hue and no tomatoes were used. The veggies varied on availability but there were always carrots, and usually something cruciferous. What made it my favorite complete meal were the dumplings. According to my sister they were a flour, milk and egg concoction. She dropped them off a teaspoon and they were chewy and perfect with the brothy soup. Since parsley was our herb of choice and always in the garden it must have been sprinkled on top. Plain old distilled vinegar was on the table to be dripped in for "oomph".  I have never been able to replicate it exactly.  (we won't discuss the time the cauliflower had a bug invasion and she tried to pass off the black flecks as course black pepper)



#76 marlaine

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 12:03 PM

leeks and potato soup...just plain delicious



#77 Darienne

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 12:35 PM

leeks and potato soup...just plain delicious

When you said 'leek', it suddenly made me remember a soup from about 50 years ago.  It had leeks and lamb in it.  Fantastic.  That's the end of my memory...


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#78 ePressureCooker

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 02:54 PM

Just in case you think I like only Chinese soups, I like lots of Western-cuisine soups - they just need to be relatively light, flavorful, clear in taste profile and not overly heavy or cheesy.  (A clear, purely liquid (no solids) classically-prepared consommé intense in its flavor would be a wondrous thing)  For that matter, when I am in the mood the classic Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup (from the can, with the requisite one can of water added) is *just perfect*. ;-) 

 

Gotta disagree with you there, I can easily make much better than Campbell's chicken noodle soup in my pressure cooker. ;D



#79 kayswv

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 05:18 PM


leeks and potato soup...just plain delicious

When you said 'leek', it suddenly made me remember a soup from about 50 years ago.  It had leeks and lamb in it.  Fantastic.  That's the end of my memory...


Would that have been Scotch Broth soup?
Kay

#80 liuzhou

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 11:17 PM

Check out The Soup Topic threads. Hundreds of soups.

 

 

Scotch Broth soup

 

Broth = soup. It's just Scotch broth. Often lamb or mutton. But must have barley. Sometimes leeks.

 



#81 ChrisZ

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:16 AM

I have a special place for pumpkin soup.  
The first pumpkin soup I tried was basically a thin,watery, blended boiled pumpkin which I didn't like at all.  Then one day my sister made a soup with 50/50 pumpkin/carrots that was sweet, thick and delicious and changed my mind.  I evolved my own pumpkin soup recipe that was crammed full of flavour - starting with 50/50 carrots and pumpkin boiled in chicken stock, but including caramelised onion, smoked bacon, red capsicum and fresh ginger with a splash of port.  
I thought my recipe was great but then I had a flatmate who made a pumpkin soup by roasting the pumpkin first, adding a dash of coconut milk and a teaspoon of peanut butter.  The result was something with a subtle hint of Asia that was totally and completely different to mine and every bit as delicious.
 
My wife's favourite is leek & potato.  I have always wondered if vichyssoise is just cold leek & potato soup or if there's some special element to it to make it unique...



#82 huiray

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:34 AM

Just in case you think I like only Chinese soups, I like lots of Western-cuisine soups - they just need to be relatively light, flavorful, clear in taste profile and not overly heavy or cheesy.  (A clear, purely liquid (no solids) classically-prepared consommé intense in its flavor would be a wondrous thing)  For that matter, when I am in the mood the classic Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup (from the can, with the requisite one can of water added) is *just perfect*. ;-) 

 

Gotta disagree with you there, I can easily make much better than Campbell's chicken noodle soup in my pressure cooker. ;D

 

Oh?  I'm sure your pressure cooker soup would be better in the absolute sense but there's no beating the plonking of that can of stuff + water into a bowl in the microwave when you're tired or cranky or sick or "just feel like it".  :smile:  :biggrin:

 

Did you get a chance to have a look at the "soup thread(s)" ?



#83 ePressureCooker

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 02:30 AM

 

Just in case you think I like only Chinese soups, I like lots of Western-cuisine soups - they just need to be relatively light, flavorful, clear in taste profile and not overly heavy or cheesy.  (A clear, purely liquid (no solids) classically-prepared consommé intense in its flavor would be a wondrous thing)  For that matter, when I am in the mood the classic Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup (from the can, with the requisite one can of water added) is *just perfect*. ;-) 

 

Gotta disagree with you there, I can easily make much better than Campbell's chicken noodle soup in my pressure cooker. ;D

 

Oh?  I'm sure your pressure cooker soup would be better in the absolute sense but there's no beating the plonking of that can of stuff + water into a bowl in the microwave when you're tired or cranky or sick or "just feel like it".  :smile:  :biggrin:

 

Did you get a chance to have a look at the "soup thread(s)" ?

 

I have started looking at it, but its a lot to go through, especially with multiple parts going back years, so I'm not finished yet.  But both these threads are giving me ideas, many ideas.



#84 Franci

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 10:45 PM

I like a lot

 

"Ris e erborin", rice and parsley in the tradition from Lombardy (with beef stock, rice cooked in the stock, potatoes and finely chopped parsley)

Minestrone with rice, to serve lukewarm  or cold, you can also pour in a bowl when hot and unmold in a plate. It's great in the summer.

Minestra con i grattini (with are like little pasta crumbles you can make in a mixer)

Pasta e patate in the Neapolitan style 

Meatballs soup with wild chicory

Fish soups with all the Italian regional variations but I also like cataplana style or bouillabaisse



#85 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 08:55 AM

Leek and fennel soup from Deborah Madison's Vegetable Literacy. I liked what the fennel added to this traditional potato + leek combination. I prefer it blended and warm. I garnished it with chives from my little herb garden.

 

8642275504_c5bba683d5_z.jpg
 

 

 



#86 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 04:44 PM

Curried carrot and parsnip.

 

I do not love parsnips as they come but in soup they are so light and sweet that I forgive them. This time I added coriander and it made the soup.

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Edited by Plantes Vertes, 31 May 2013 - 04:45 PM.


#87 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 06:39 PM

*cough* 'Thai' *cough* soup:

 

Ginger, garlic, red chili, coriander, lemongrass, shallots, lemon and lime juice, coconut milk, vegetable broth.

 

 

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#88 huiray

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:32 PM

*cough* 'Thai' *cough* soup:

 

Ginger, garlic, red chili, coriander, lemongrass, shallots, lemon and lime juice, coconut milk, vegetable broth.

 

Heh.  Well, it *is* sort-of, uh, Thai, in inspiration... :-)  It looks like a nice soup.



#89 heidih

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:34 PM


*cough* 'Thai' *cough* soup:
 
Ginger, garlic, red chili, coriander, lemongrass, shallots, lemon and lime juice, coconut milk, vegetable broth.

 
Heh.  Well, it *is* sort-of, uh, Thai, in inspiration... :-)  It looks like a nice soup.


Gosh I was being a sweet little old lady and thought the poor thing had a cold - that seems like a soup to cure ills - no judgement on style

#90 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 09:20 PM


Heh.  Well, it *is* sort-of, uh, Thai, in inspiration... :-)  It looks like a nice soup.

 

Thanks, it was!

 

Gosh I was being a sweet little old lady and thought the poor thing had a cold - that seems like a soup to cure ills - no judgement on style

 

No, if anyone's sick it's probably the Thai people :unsure: ... But there's nothing wrong with me, so I'm pretty sure that soup does work!


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 31 May 2013 - 09:24 PM.