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Making Mexican at home

Mexican

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#391 EatNopales

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:34 AM

final result:



Hello.. those look good.. in case you don't know.. there is a final step when making tortillas... keep them in cotton towels, inside a lidded container while you are making the rest... they will steam in their own moist heat, get soft & pliable.

#392 Darienne

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:40 AM

Oh my gosh! What a lovely blog! I can see this young family at that restaurant! Thank you ever so much for the delightful look into this refried bean topic! Isnt it amazing how so much can be said about one dish? Sadly I need to forego the bacon/pork! :unsure: And I went to get beans and got the wrong ones! I got dark ones-they are not Pinto as in the pictures. On SUnday I will go get the right ones and delay the meal till another family get together. ANyhow, the avoes are hard as rock. Thank you!!!! :rolleyes:
p.s. looking and googling for refried I came across how to make McDonald french fries on a video-wild!!! who would have ever guessed??? And I found advice how to soften avoes -doubt any really work!!

OK. I'll bite. How does one soften avocados and why didn't I know last night? Making a Tex/Mex luncheon spread for us and our two stalwart workers. DH picked out the avocados for me. Oh well.

I wonder what the consensus would be for trying some of the pork recipes with beef. Or even chicken. Although there are enough really good beef and chicken recipes to pick from.

Our current favorite (part of today's enchilada filling) is Puerco Pibil. What would it be like with beef or chicken for those who cannot eat pork?
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#393 andiesenji

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:54 AM

If you put avocados in a brown paper bag with an apple and a banana peel (or a banana) and close it tightly, they will ripen much faster, usually within 24 hours.
You can also "soften" them in the microwave, no more than 45 seconds.
However this will not ripen them, it will just make them softer so they can be mashed.
The flavor will still be unripe, not as complex or buttery
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#394 MikeHartnett

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 09:56 AM

Sadly I need to forego the bacon/pork! :unsure:


Whoops! I'm sure it can be replaced- you just need to get some smokiness and umami in there somehow...

#395 Darienne

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 10:26 AM

If you put avocados in a brown paper bag with an apple and a banana peel (or a banana) and close it tightly, they will ripen much faster, usually within 24 hours.
You can also "soften" them in the microwave, no more than 45 seconds.
However this will not ripen them, it will just make them softer so they can be mashed.
The flavor will still be unripe, not as complex or buttery

Thanks Andie. A tad too late for this meal. I finally gave up on the mixer and mashed the lumpy bits through a fine sieve. That seemed to work...but you are correct about the flavor.

Morale of story: do not let my DH pick avocados.

I take it that the paper bag/apple/banana actually 'ripens' them.
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#396 andiesenji

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 01:11 PM


Sadly I need to forego the bacon/pork! :unsure:


Whoops! I'm sure it can be replaced- you just need to get some smokiness and umami in there somehow...



A great way to add smokiness to beans is to brew some Lapsang Souchong tea and use that as part of the cooking liquid for your beans.
I often cook for vegetarians and vegans and have used this method many, many times.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#397 Lior

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 02:30 PM

oh my goodness! I googled the tea and it has a pine smoked flavor. I now have to start searching for a source!! WOuld a smoky chipotle as someone mentioned earlier work? I will look for the tea though. Thanks for the kind words about my final results, Eat Nopales! I will do that! Yes, those are the tips I read about for ripening avoes!! I also saw one about wrapping in silver foil or putting in the sun.

#398 Lior

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:40 AM

Hi!! SO I decided to go ahead with my plans for a mexican lunch even though the avoes were not quite ready and the beans were not pinto. Hey, I can do this again in 2 weeks! SO I made refried beans according the the amazing recipe on that blog mentioned a few posts ago. I am sure it was not perfect since there was no pork/bacon, but it was very tasty! I hung up some peppers to dry for future use.

I slow cooked brown beans for about 2 hours or so. I drained the liquid off and added, onion, garlic and chipotle tabasco smoked sauce or something like that anyhow! I added what was left of the grated fresh tomatoes spiced with chile and paprica from breakfast (not mexican...) and cooked like a kind of soup broth.

Next I fried diced onions and garlic and added the beans in 3 increments mashing each time (good for my muscles!). All the time while frying. Then I added the broth and mashed more. I added some salt and some more chipotle tabasco whatever-to taste. I used the cheese I have-parmesan and mozzerella. Thank you soooo much for a wonderful lunch. I tols the family all about this thread over lunch.

The pictures will tell the rest! We had a wonderful lunch!!

Attached Images

  • brown beans.jpg
  • chili peppers.jpg
  • refried beans1.jpg
  • refried beans2.jpg
  • mezze.jpg


#399 Lior

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:41 AM

Of course I made more tortillas as well.

#400 Darienne

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:23 AM

Good one, Ilana. You are really going great guns now. There will be no stopping you, senorita. Ole!
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#401 EatNopales

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:56 AM

Regarding Beans... Pinto Beans are certainly not requisite for cooking Mexican cuisine... 100 years ago very few people in Mexico used Pinto Beans it wasn't until industrial farming & the country's rapid urbanization in the 1960's & 1970's that Pinto Beans took a major share of the bean market.... prior to that Mexico was the dominion of hundreds of heirloom bean varieties. Even nowadays Pinto beans are much more "Tex-Mex" than Mexican as the country still retains some strong regional affinities...

Black Beans are the norm from the southern tip of Veracruz, to the Yucatan down the Isthmus of Tehuantepec to the Oaxacan coasts, Flor de Mayo beans in the Anahuac basin, Mayocoba (Peruano) in Michoacan & Jalisco etc., etc.,

#402 andiesenji

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:26 AM

My Mexican neighbors, originally from Durango, prefer the Canary beans, now called Peruano beans - the latter name has become more common in the past twenty years or so and in spite of the name they are native to Mexico. They grew them on their ranch as well as pink beans and a broad bean (no name). They like these because the skins are not as tough as pinto beans and they are creamier when cooked.

Edited by andiesenji, 21 November 2011 - 10:27 AM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#403 Lior

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 01:37 PM

so fascinating!! SO it is not terrible that I used these beans!I think they were red pearl beans by looking at pictures of beans at this amazing site:
http://www.purcellmo...ruano Beans.htm

Thank you!

#404 Jaymes

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 01:56 PM

Fruit emits a gas as it ripens - ethylene. If you put fruit into a paper bag, it traps the gas, and ripens the fruit more quickly. Some fruit gives off more ethylene than others; hence the advice to add a banana or apple. Or peach or plum. Sometimes the fruit ripens too quickly, so if you're ripening peaches or plums or something, you have to keep a close eye on them. They can ripen and spoil within a day, and certainly within two. Don't try it with plastic bags. You do need the material to breathe a little, and absorb moisture. If you wrap them in plastic, they'll just rot before they ripen.

Put your avocados into a paper bag (you don't really need any other fruit if you don't have it) and fold it over. Leave it out on the counter. Your avocados should be perfectly ripe and soft by the next day.

Edited by Jaymes, 21 November 2011 - 02:01 PM.

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#405 Lior

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:55 PM

thank you! I will try this. Great explanation! :smile:

#406 C. sapidus

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 07:23 PM

Lior, major props on your forays into Mexican cooking – definitely more of a challenge when key ingredients are not readily available! Our dinner tonight, adapted from Mexico the Beautiful Cookbook:

Bay scallops a la Mexicana – with tomatoes, white onion, garlic, pickled jalapenos, black pepper, bay leaves, parsley, and thyme. Scallops were sautéed in butter and then simmered in the sauce. Mrs. C (not normally a scallop fan) had seconds, and perhaps even thirds. :smile:

Chard and spinach with potato and chorizo – plus more white onion and tomatoes. Potatoes and chorizo overcame the boys’ usual aversion to spinach.

Guacamole

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#407 Lior

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Posted 09 December 2011 - 02:21 AM

Oh my goodness! WHat beautiful dishes!! Now I am inspired once again! I have done the tortilla dinner twice now-with all the necessary ingredients. Even fussy 14 year old got into it finally! Time to move on. I will go through the thread to get the next idea. Thank you sooo much "Beautiful Savory Swimmer"...

#408 menuinprogress

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:20 PM

Chicken chilaquiles with saucy black beans:

IMG_6223.JPG
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#409 Kouign Aman

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:46 PM

I bought a packet of these at the local Mexican market. I think the man called them "huaraches". That's a word I've previously only heard used for woven leather sandals.
They are a quadruple thick corn tortilla, essentially. They're about 10" long (that's the large burner on the stove).

The internet shows pictures of them used for tostadas etc.
I toasted one and make a quesadilla with it, but was not impressed. Its too thick and stodgy.
I'm much inclined to stick to regular corn tortillas.
Has anyone used these things and been happy about it? What how why ?! Thanks.
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#410 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 02:53 PM

Wow, huaraches.... Down here we'd use that with intensely spiced carne adobado, sort of as a trencher (although I'm unsure whether this is the Mexican use as well). Once they've absorbed a bunch of the sauce from the meat, they're spread with crumbled cheese and eaten by slices.
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#411 EatNopales

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:21 PM

I bought a packet of these at the local Mexican market. I think the man called them "huaraches". That's a word I've previously only heard used for woven leather sandals.
They are a quadruple thick corn tortilla, essentially. They're about 10" long (that's the large burner on the stove).

The internet shows pictures of them used for tostadas etc.
I toasted one and make a quesadilla with it, but was not impressed. Its too thick and stodgy.
I'm much inclined to stick to regular corn tortillas.
Has anyone used these things and been happy about it? What how why ?! Thanks.
2012-03-28 download 315.jpg



Hello... Huaraches are THE regional antojito in many towns around Mexico City (and in the city proper as well)... basically they are the Sope of that area although the toppings are very regional... meaning your typical Huarache lady is more like to have Huitlacoche, Squash Blossoms, Nopales, Cecina, Carne Adobada etc., than Carnitas, Shredded Chicken etc.,

Fellow Egullet poster Menu In Progress has a nice post on Huaraches:

http://menuinprogres...che-azteca.html



I personally wouldn't buy the packaged version myself... but the way to reheat them is to melt a little lard & brush all over the huarache then reheat it on a hot comal / skillet, flipping after the oil sizzles & the wafting aromas of toasted corn make you salivate... then proceed to top as desired.

Perhaps the most memorable Huarache I've had was at the mercado in Xochimilco... it had black beans pureed with avocado leaf, then a layer of chopped lamb barbacoa, then a layer of fried, battered whole charales (a smelt like fresh water fish), crumbles of fresh goat cheese & a chunky green salsa

#412 andiesenji

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 09:37 AM

This deal for a Tamale-Making Class with Beer Flight for one or two, at what seems to be a very reasonable cost (using the Groupon deal) just appeared in my email this morning.
For anyone who lives near the Silver Lake district in L.A. this should be fun.

It might be fun for a small group if you can convince others to buy the deal.
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#413 Jaymes

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 09:07 AM

Usually I wait until our local grocer gets Seville Oranges in, and then I squeeze and freeze juice for pibil. I had never looked for bottled Naranja Agria juice, so maybe this is something everyone knew but me, but yesterday, while strolling through a local Mexican market, I discovered several brands, among them "Badia." Goya makes a "sour orange marinade," but I didn't check to see if there is anything added.

Still, I was very glad to see that sour orange juice is a product that I can buy bottled. Who knew? Not me.
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#414 mkayahara

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 06:08 AM

Last night I made the enchiladas de chile ajo featured on the cover of the Mexico issue of Saveur. I don't have much experience making any enchiladas, and this is my first time making the dip-and-roll kind, so by the time I was done the last one, the first ones were decidedly cold. I guess keeping them in the oven, or at least using heated plates, would help! I used store-bought tortillas, and found them a bit heavy. Sadly, I don't have a lot of choice for brands of corn tortillas around here. The sauce seemed a bit thick, though again I assume that's user error, but it was delicious, and I would make it again. Whenever I make chilli-based sauces like this, I'm very grateful for my Vita Mix!

Saveur enchiladas.jpg
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#415 Darienne

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 09:58 AM

Well, they look lovely and I'd be glad to come to your house and eat them anytime! :smile:
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#416 rancho_gordo

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 11:47 AM

They look pretty good from here!
If the sauce is too thick, you can thin it out with a little chicken stock.
I like to dip, stuff and roll and then move on to the next plate. I think three or four is a lot. Normally i make two plus salad and beans on the side. But when all are assembled, then you can pour over the extra chile sauce (that's hopefully still hot) and then crumble a little cheese.
Conventional wisdom says that older, slightly stale tortillas don't absorb as much oil and are better to use than super fresh ones. I don't know if it's really true but I always hear this and follow the advice.
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#417 mkayahara

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 06:25 AM

Thank you both! I'm sure I'm being too hard on myself... they were pretty good! The sauce was probably fine when it first went into the pan, but the recipe calls for you to simmer it to reduce, and I'm not sure it was necessary. When serving them, I made my husband's plate first and served it to him, then made my own, so we could both eat while they were still at least warm, even if it meant not quite eating together. Pouring some of the extra sauce over top would have been a good idea, for sure.
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#418 kalypso

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 08:59 AM

I made the cover recipe a few weeks ago as well and thought it quite good. I really like the flavor profile. I ended up with a good bit of sauce and it had great consistency. The recipe is pretty straightforward and the directions easy to follow. It took a little longer to make than I had anticipated, but that was just a miscalculation on my part. This enchilada sauce is definitely worth making.

I have the ability to get good quality tortillas already made, but I made my own which I think did contribute to the success of the dish a little bit. These are dip, stuff and eat-right-away style enchilada. I served 2 enchiladas per plate and did spoon some of the hot sauce over them right before I put them on the table.

I'd encourage anyone to try this recipe, it's not super hard, but it is pretty darned tasty.

#419 EatNopales

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 03:33 PM

I made the cover recipe a few weeks ago as well and thought it quite good. I really like the flavor profile. I ended up with a good bit of sauce and it had great consistency. The recipe is pretty straightforward and the directions easy to follow. It took a little longer to make than I had anticipated, but that was just a miscalculation on my part. This enchilada sauce is definitely worth making.

I have the ability to get good quality tortillas already made, but I made my own which I think did contribute to the success of the dish a little bit. These are dip, stuff and eat-right-away style enchilada. I served 2 enchiladas per plate and did spoon some of the hot sauce over them right before I put them on the table.

I'd encourage anyone to try this recipe, it's not super hard, but it is pretty darned tasty.



Lately, I have dished mestizo style enchiladas in favor of pre hispanic style... it solves the issue of keeping them warm for multiple diners, skips the messy wrapping step, and offers greater plating & flavoring possibilities. Basically, you make a gordita on the comal (a tortilla that is anywhere from 1/4 inch to 1/2 thick).... after the surface is fully seared & you have the nice char spots... you simmer a batch in the enchilada sauce (such as the one referenced above) for about 10 minutes... then top with a wide range of ingredients... hard boiled turkey eggs, quelites, frog legs, various meats and more were described by various Spaniards who witnessed the great market of Tlatelolco.

I personally am a big fan of topping them with a mound of raw greens previously tossed with warm cecina or chicharron then plopping a fried egg over that & a sprinkling of fish roe.

#420 C. sapidus

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 05:44 AM

Catching up on this thread after a spate of Mexican (and sorta-Mexican) cooking. I look forward to seeing what everyone else is making!

Puerco al passilla enmielado

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Chileatole rojo de pollo con ejotes y papas

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Arroz verde al Poblano

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Huevos rancheros with, um, bacon

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Carne asada al guajillo

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Mixed seafood with salsa de chile guajillo

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Platanos fritos

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Albondigas

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Picadillo

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