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14 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

@Captain & @Okanagancook– Oh, dear Lord.  That crackling.  I would seriously eat it all and explain that it caught on fire and had to be cut off and discarded. 

 

@David Ross – I’ve saved your sauerbraten recipe.  I love that dish and need to make it again.

 

@Ann_T – what beautiful little roasted potatoes to go with your gorgeous duck.  I can almost taste them. 

 

@Shelby – your fried shrimp look really good.  Are those cornflake crumbs?

 

I am starting to call myself Calamity Kim.  Last fall I was diagnosed with “runner’s knee” in both knees.  It can also affect older knees and I apparently have the old people version because I am decidedly NOT a runner.  Nothing really helped a lot, though physical therapy (PT) did a little and I’ve been doing a regimen at home.  I went back into PT to get some additional exercises and managed to hurt myself doing one of them.  I am now basically bed/couch-ridden.  They have me using a wheelchair or walker, icing my knee on and off and keeping it elevated.  It happened last Tuesday, and it is not improving.  I’m getting an MRI on the 17th.  So, I’m just not cooking right now.  At least until I can figure out how to do it on my back. 

 

Last week we finally cut into one of the huge radishes that Jessica got in her vegetable box.  It was really pretty and fairly tasty.  I put it with English cucumber and rice wine vinegar:

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Used more of the char siu that night on top of what was basically vegetable fried rice:

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The rest of it went into the freezer for our next family project – eggrolls.

 

Night before last, bless his heart, Mr. Kim made spaghetti:

IMG_4054.jpg.7a13e06c72fc955de20fe4162b93132b.jpg

 

Then last night he used the leftover sauce and some frozen cooked fried chicken cutlets to make chicken parm:

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He served it with a crusty roll, salad, and apricots:

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Pretty sure I'm getting spaghetti tonight, too.  😳😉

 


@Kim Shook sorry to hear about your injuries; wishing you a speedy recovery. Perhaps instead of repeated spaghetti dinners Mr. Kim can pick up takeout from some of your favorite restaurants.

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@LeaSim Beautiful pictures. I sure do like tofu when done well. How did your home made tofu stands against the shop bought ones? I'm sure is tastes much fresher, but how is the texture? If I recall nigari tends to produce firmer tofu sometimes a bit crumbly.

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~ Shai N.

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CCST was bought a little Lamb, 

And now needs a bigger freezer. 

20201113_193901.thumb.jpg.0f3656737882b824ee467eb27e461912.jpg

 

After portioning and freezing and choosing bits I want to mince. I was sick of it. (Especially after locking myself out of the house and fretting over it for an hour). 

So simple lamb tray bake. No idea what part of the animal 😂

20201113_195111.thumb.jpg.aeee19b656f692d3f090e9eea2227b3b.jpg

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With the new arrival, I acted like a proud parent and showed it off...

 

1329586121_CurryJap11-12MG_2771.thumb.jpeg.ece80e45529c35b603c13354eae3b920.jpeg

 

Japanese curry rice.  Curry of pork, Korean sweet potato, American red potato, onion, carrot, mushrooms, ginger, garlic.  Semi-milled Japanese brown rice came out perfect!

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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On 11/12/2020 at 3:24 PM, shain said:

@LeaSim Beautiful pictures. I sure do like tofu when done well. How did your home made tofu stands against the shop bought ones? I'm sure is tastes much fresher, but how is the texture? If I recall nigari tends to produce firmer tofu sometimes a bit crumbly.

Hello @shain, yes the tofu made with nigari is firmer and yet fresher , you are right. Button crumbly, it depends on the ratio of the water and the beans.

But sometimes it is very good to eat a stronger flavored tofu, when you want this kind of tofu nigari tofu is your choice ~~ it is what I think. Have a nice day 

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Authentique Chinese food blog - YouTube cooking videos 

Quality > Quantity 

English videos/ Version Français aussi/ 中文版视频

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Santorini fava two ways.

Traditional with capers and onion in red wine vinegar.

With smoked mussels and dill. I found this combination quite interesting, though I would have add more mussels if I had some, and perhaps slice them.

Peas salad with feta, sirene, almonds, mint, honey, pepper.

 

PXL_20201106_130704207.thumb.jpg.9b849cc9064fbb83ad89538b2ebcdaff.jpgPXL_20201106_130604753.thumb.jpg.bf0515721892e54b014b7f9ca6cf303b.jpgPXL_20201106_125545714.thumb.jpg.607b561b1ae2bd051626842d9160df29.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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25 minutes ago, shain said:

Santorini fava two ways.

Traditional with capers and onion in red wine vinegar.

With smoked mussels and dill. I found this combination quite interesting, though I would have add more mussels if I had some, and perhaps slice them.

Peas salad with feta, sirene, almonds, mint, honey, pepper.

 

PXL_20201106_130704207.thumb.jpg.9b849cc9064fbb83ad89538b2ebcdaff.jpgPXL_20201106_130604753.thumb.jpg.bf0515721892e54b014b7f9ca6cf303b.jpg

I had to look that up - so yellow split peas? Here people tend to only see them (in my experience) as a soup or dal. Will have to play. Thanks. 

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Not pretty, but sometimes life is like that. 
 

Garlic butter oyster mushrooms to go with cabbage and Italian sausage.
 

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4DD49956-CD23-435A-BD54-0F67484C6190.jpeg.47fe5a6d631ac6a154616f76398ec86e.jpeg 

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"I like 'em french fried pertaters." (Billy Bob Thornton as Karl, in Sling Blade.)
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52 minutes ago, heidih said:

I had to look that up - so yellow split peas? Here people tend to only see them (in my experience) as a soup or dal. Will have to play. Thanks. 

 

Yep. I think that yellow split peas had recently became one of my favorite pulses. I was not used to cook with them and had split peas mostly associated with lentil soup. In spreads and dals, I find them to be a good background for other flavors. And for some stews and cold servings, they can be cooked al dente, without being starchy like most other pulses (for example, I use them this way for example khoresh bademjan).

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~ Shai N.

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Store bought/cooked Beijing Duck. On the large round plate is the duck meat with re-crisped skin. The smaller plate has the pancakes for wrapping and cucumber, mooli radish and scallions. The sauce bottom left is plum sauce - not hoisin sauce!!!

 

And because I'm strange some soy sauce top right for dipping the assembled wraps. The carcass and neck etc are in the fridge to make duck stock tomorrow.

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Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Some meatballs and sausage came out of the freezer.

Made a tomato sauce based on them, with onions and a little fresh garlic (Americans use way more garlic than they might in Italy when making tomato sauces). Too much? Not necessarily, but I try to respect the culture.

 

1995229253_Tomatosaucewithsausage11-13.thumb.jpeg.3c36d1aa86864163ca91066258b9b46b.jpeg

 

Removed and saved some of the sauce (and one meatball) for later meals, plus this way I get to scrape all the concentrated goodies off the sides of the (let's call it a Windsor) sauce pan. Pasta gets added to that, along with a little pasta cooking water to thin out the sauce and better coat the noodles. (Turn your head away, @Franci - I know pasta and meatballs, especially tossed in the sauce, is heresy!).

 

332546717_Fusilliwmeatballsandsausage11-13.thumb.jpeg.ba317122ac856a278cd182acee8aebe6.jpeg

 

Fusilli with sausage and meatballs and parmesan. Since I was going all out Italian-American - De Cecco!

 

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Smothered cabbage, a la Marcella. The cabbage turns super sweet, adding nothing but onions, salt, pepper, and a sprinkle or two of good red wine vinegar. Cooks for an hour and a half, covered, on lowest heat possible. 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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3 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Store bought/cooked Beijing Duck. On the large round plate is the duck meat with re-crisped skin. The smaller plate has the pancakes for wrapping and cucumber, mooli radish and scallions. The sauce bottom left is plum sauce - not hoisin sauce!!!

 

And because I'm strange some soy sauce top right for dipping the assembled wraps. The carcass and neck etc are in the fridge to make duck stock tomorrow.

2002279478_20201114_1800441.thumb.jpg.5affe672d189c68f676ee36c3466c142.jpg

 

406763408_20201114_1800501.thumb.jpg.0e659674f0fdf967af55cc8d11276e34.jpg

I'm curious how you recrisped the skin. I don't remember - do you have an oven?  I know they're not common in China.

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

I'm curious how you recrisped the skin. I don't remember - do you have an oven?  I know they're not common in China.

 

I did have a toaster oven but it died a few months back and I haven't gotten round to replacing it yet. I do have a low powered microwave (400W) and use it. I put the skin between two sheets of kitchen paper and nuke it for two minutes on full power.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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