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French Culinary Terms

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#61 rickster

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 10:33 AM

I'm glad you brought this topic up again.
How about Grenobloise?

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I would say it's more like: Gruhn-o-blwahz.

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I agree with the last half, but think that "Gren" is pronounced closer to the way it is spelled, than "Gruhn", but I suppose it can depend on your accent too.

#62 Abra

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 04:45 PM

Madeleine = Mahd-lenn

Grenobloise = greuh-no-blwahz approximately, but that particular e sound doesn't really exist in English, it's a little shorter than our eh sound

edited to add: the pronunciation of millefeuille is another that can't be easily compared to English, but fuh-eye (as above) is definitely not it. I'd go with meel-foy-ee before I'd say meel-fuh-eye, knowing that that's not exactly it either, but it's a lot closer. If you can pronounce the word oeil in French, the feuille sound is almost exactly the same.

Edited by Abra, 25 June 2009 - 04:50 PM.


#63 polpus

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Posted 27 June 2009 - 09:57 AM

How about Dulce de Leche?

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http://www.forvo.com...dulce_de_leche/

:biggrin:

#64 RichardJones

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 07:36 AM

This is a fun topic. It's also quite eye-opening to see how foreign words get subsumed and morphed and anglicized, americanized and so on.

While some of the pronunciations given seem to be what one hears most often from American speakers, they also vary wildly from the French.

For those that are interested, I'll have a go at International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcriptions of most of the French words discussed as pronounced in 'standard French'. Although not perfect, the IPA is useful since it is a common point of reference... a personal transcription (such as 'Creh-pe') will be pronounced in a host of different ways depending on where you're from.

[NB In case my IPA font does not work online see bottom of post for a screenshot of the next section.]

Tuile [tɥil]
Genoise [ʒenwaz]
Bavaroise [bavaʁwaz]
Cannelle (cinnamon) [kanɛl]
Cannelé (batter-based nibble) [kanle]
Dacquoise [dakwaz]
Dragees [dʁaʒe]
Pithiviers [pitivje]
Frangipane [fʁɑ̃nʒipan]
Macaron [makaʁɔ̃]
Millefeuille [milfœj]
Non pareil [nɔ̃paʁɛj]

If you are not familiar with the IPA have a look here where there is a clickable chart. A few quick pointers are that in an IPA transcription every element is pronounced. The consonants are largely similar to their 'neutral' forms in English, with the ʒ symbol representing the soft sound of 'g' in 'genre'.

The vowels are trickier and I would refer you to the site above for more information if you care about precision. It might be worth pointing out there is a difference between e and ɛ and between a and ɑ. The little squiggle ̃ means the vowel is nasalized.

I hope this is of some interest, if only minority.

R

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Picture 69.png
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#65 chezcherie

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 01:15 PM

gahhhh...i hate this sign of aging. can't for the life of me recall the french term for scoring the edge of dough with the spine of a knife to create a decorative border. anybody?? tia!
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#66 andiesenji

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 01:21 PM

gahhhh...i hate this sign of aging. can't for the life of me recall the french term for scoring the edge of dough with the spine of a knife to create a decorative border. anybody?? tia!

Friser?   Maybe you mean "plier"  (plee-aa)  but that is a folded edge like on a pasty. 

 

It's been forty years since I took a course in French cookery, and I recall few terms but these sort of stuck in my mind.


Edited by andiesenji, 23 February 2013 - 01:24 PM.

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#67 Lisa Shock

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 03:45 PM

I believe it's Sertir, here's an example of it in use: http://www.ebay.com/...=item1c25eff58f

#68 chezcherie

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 04:58 PM

thanks to you both. after some searching, i think the term i was looking for is chiqueter. refers to crimping, not necessarily, but possibly with the back of a knife. that may not be it, though...i still have that  "unscratched itch" feeling about this term.


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#69 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 02:04 AM

Yes, chiqueter is the term you're looking for.  I don't know how many hours I've spent doing it on Galettes des Rois...



#70 Alleguede

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 08:26 PM

Yes the term is "chiqueter la pâte". It refers to either using a special tool to do the rim of a tart but also the gesture to push back a dough with a finger or knife...

#71 georgeb

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 12:10 PM

I recall hearing a French culinary term meaning, "the best possible use/condition" for any particular ingredient.

 

Can someone please help, or just tell me that I was dreaming...



#72 Cesum Pec

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 03:36 AM

There is a method of pan cooking in lots of butter, where the butter is repeatedly pushed over the meat.  I've seen it on some cooking show and wanted to read up on it more but can't remember the name of this technique.  Any one know? 



#73 nickrey

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 03:49 AM

Basting?


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#74 weinoo

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 04:46 AM

Sure sounds like basting to me.  In this case, butter basting. You can see it in action in this topic:  How to Cook a Steak.


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#75 Cesum Pec

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 05:07 AM

That Ducasse method is close to what I saw but not quite it.  And the term they used was French sounding, nothing as easy as basting unfortunately.  Thanks for trying. 



#76 liuzhou

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 05:32 AM

the term they used was French sounding, nothing as easy as basting unfortunately. Thanks for trying.

 

Well 'basting' isn't French. Perhaps they used 'arroser' which is French for 'to baste'.



#77 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 08:29 AM

liuzhou is right 'arroser' is the word the French use. Here it is in use:

 

Assaisonner la viande de sel uniquement. Saisir la viande sur une poêle très chaude pendant une minute sur la première face. Retourner la viande et cuire à nouveau pendant une minute. Baisser le feu, ajouter un morceau de beurre et arroser pendant une bonne minute la viande avec la sauce. Laisser reposer 2 à 3 minutes hors du feu pour que les muscles de la viande se détendent. Ajouter le poivre et déguster.

 

This is from a lesson on how to fry meat.



#78 pastrygirl

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 11:20 AM

I want to say poele or poeler, because I know I've heard cooks call it something that sounds like pwa-lay, and poele is what google turns up as a cooking term, but the search results don't really support it (it means frying pan or to fry). This is also what you do to duck breast while it is rendering skin-side down - keep spooning hot duck fat over the flesh side to cook it at the same time. I guess that's kind of frying.

Unless you mean monte au buerre, but that is adding butter to sauces to emulsify and thicken just before serving.

#79 Twyst

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 01:19 PM

I want to say poele or poeler, because I know I've heard cooks call it something that sounds like pwa-lay, and poele is what google turns up as a cooking term, but the search results don't really support it (it means frying pan or to fry).

i was taught that poillet was simply roasting, but with a lid

#80 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 01:46 PM

Poêler is cooking in a pan = to fry.

 

It seems that arroser is correct in the cooking context to designate the action of basting with butter or melted fat, although for general use it just means "to water".



#81 Twyst

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Posted 13 August 2013 - 10:43 PM

Poêler is cooking in a pan = to fry.

Did a little research on this, and in traditional french cooking, its roasting in a covered vessel and is sometimes called butter roasting. It is one of the 7 techniques of classical french cooking.

 

Somewhere along the line some people started using it to mean pan fry because of the literal translation, but that is not the traditional meaning of the word.

 

 

Le Poeler- A tough cut of meat that is cooked in a humid atmosphere (covered dish) to obtain a more tender end product. Can have aromatics added to help with the exchange of flavors.

http://cookingandcon...e-cuissons.html

 

The French technique Le Poeler does not have an English translation. It is basically a special type of roast that is too tough to roast, but is too tender to braise. The demonstration that Chef Kang gave to our class was with a guinea hen. With this type of roast we had to sear it in a pan before placing it in the oven with a lid on top to continue to cook. This cooking method combines both the rotir and the braiser to create a tender and juicy meat while still keeping some of the flavor of roasting. When the meat is done in the oven we place a baste on the bird and return to the oven with no lid to create a crust that was taken away from the steam when cooking with the lid on. 

http://thehungrydude...-the-home-cook/

 

 

And in my notes from way back when I was in culinary school etc.


Edited by Twyst, 13 August 2013 - 10:46 PM.


#82 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 11:57 AM

Twyst,

 

Regarding "poêler", I am not sure what you mean by "traditional meaning of the word". I was just pointing out that the first definition for "poêler" in the French dictionary is to cook something in a frying pan. So this is what French people like me who did not go to culinary school will think of when you use that term. It’s also what I have seen in French restaurants to describe menu items that are cooked in a pan – “foie gras poêlé” is a typical example.

 

Regarding “cuisson poêler” from the Guide Culinaire, it seems to be very specific and corresponds to the technique you describe in your post. Because the term is confusing, I’ve seen some people prefer the terms “cuisson à l'étuvée” or “cuisson à l'étouffée”.

 

Ce qu’on se poêle….







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