Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

White chocolate ganache

Chocolate

  • Please log in to reply
80 replies to this topic

#31 Aria

Aria
  • participating member
  • 100 posts

Posted 30 November 2005 - 08:40 PM

Once again, thank you so much!! I feel I'm taking a lot and not giving in return.
Anyway, Wendy, I'm intrigued as to how you use an immersion blender to temper, I can't imagine that.
Also, Wendy, do you stick ( ha! ) the blender right into the chocolate that's melting over the double boiler or do you do it while it's been removed from the heat source?
Finally, I don't temper the chocolate for the ganache!

#32 Wendy DeBord

Wendy DeBord
  • legacy participant
  • 3,653 posts

Posted 02 December 2005 - 06:46 AM

I always take my bowl off the double boiler when I use my stick blender............but that's because I don't want my cord to accidentally get burned. The way our outlets are by our counter my cord is too long and seems to get into everything.

If anyone reading this is interested, I'd love to find someone willing to do a demo thread on the method of tempering. Please pm me if your interested.

#33 Aria

Aria
  • participating member
  • 100 posts

Posted 07 January 2006 - 04:49 PM

Hey all,
I have leftover white chocolate and cranberry ganache. I really don't feel like rolling any more truffles, does anyone have any suggestions as to what I can do with it? Thanks!

#34 Trishiad

Trishiad
  • participating member
  • 544 posts
  • Location:sebastopol, ca

Posted 07 January 2006 - 05:22 PM

pour over brownies?

#35 RuthWells

RuthWells
  • participating member
  • 671 posts

Posted 07 January 2006 - 05:44 PM

Hey all,
I have leftover white chocolate and cranberry ganache. I really don't feel like rolling any more truffles, does anyone have any suggestions as to what I can do with it? Thanks!

View Post


It should freeze okay if you want to wait for inspiration.

#36 John DePaula

John DePaula
  • participating member
  • 1,495 posts
  • Location:Portland, OR

Posted 07 January 2006 - 06:09 PM

You could use it to fill a tart shell: Pate Sucree or even a quick graham cracker crust.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#37 highchef

highchef
  • participating member
  • 1,129 posts
  • Location:Louisiana

Posted 07 January 2006 - 07:30 PM

remelt and serve with hot spicy gingerbread.

#38 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 07 January 2006 - 08:23 PM

Eat it with a spoon?

That's probably what I'd do :blush:

#39 MightyD

MightyD
  • participating member
  • 117 posts

Posted 07 January 2006 - 08:31 PM

thin it down with hot cream and use it as a sauce.

#40 KatieLoeb

KatieLoeb
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,156 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 07 January 2006 - 10:31 PM

Eat it with a spoon?

That's probably what I'd do  :blush:

View Post


Hey - that's what I was going to say! :raz:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#41 ablosh

ablosh
  • participating member
  • 69 posts

Posted 08 January 2006 - 06:01 AM

I'd use it as frosting... FOR EVERYTHING! Hahaha!

I have leftover coffee mocha ganache inside my refrigerator right now and I use it on biscuits, cakes, breads or on its own.

I have to warn you though--IT IS HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH! lol. ;)
I am in the process of fulfilling a dream, one that involves a huge stainless kitchen, heavenly desserts and lots of happy sweet-toothed people.

#42 2010

2010
  • participating member
  • 93 posts

Posted 08 January 2006 - 08:20 AM

Add some hot whole milk and drink it as white hot chocolate and stir with a leftover candycane, oooh! :wub:

#43 highchef

highchef
  • participating member
  • 1,129 posts
  • Location:Louisiana

Posted 08 January 2006 - 09:32 AM

Add some hot whole milk and drink it as white hot chocolate and stir with a leftover candycane, oooh! :wub:

View Post



I like that one too!! :smile:

#44 Randi

Randi
  • participating member
  • 576 posts

Posted 08 January 2006 - 10:00 AM

Add some hot whole milk and drink it as white hot chocolate and stir with a leftover candycane, oooh! :wub:

View Post



I like that one too!! :smile:

View Post


Yeah, that one got my attention too!
"Well," said Pooh, "what I like best --" and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called. - A.A. Milne

#45 2010

2010
  • participating member
  • 93 posts

Posted 09 January 2006 - 08:18 AM

Just in case y'all want to make it from scratch http://www.marthaste...styleType=learn

It's really good! :wub:

Edited by 2010, 09 January 2006 - 08:20 AM.


#46 McAuliflower

McAuliflower
  • participating member
  • 245 posts
  • Location:Portland, OR

Posted 09 January 2006 - 04:20 PM

You could also spread the ganache on cookies or graham crackers and pop them into the freezer. We would do this with frosting as a kid. It gets all chewy firm good!

I've been on a marshmallowmaking binge the last couple of weeks... You could make some excellent 'smores with ganache as your chocolate layer! I'm thinking strawberry marshmallows with white chocolate ganache... :wub:
"A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart who looks at her watch." --JB
Brownie Points- Culinary Notebook

#47 rooftop1000

rooftop1000
  • participating member
  • 2,839 posts
  • Location:hills of north jersey

Posted 09 January 2006 - 06:20 PM

Add some hot whole milk and drink it as white hot chocolate and stir with a leftover candycane, oooh! :wub:

View Post




actually I had dark choc ganache and white cho mousse...I made hot cocoa and floated the mousse like a marshmallow


Mmmmmmmmm

tracey
The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers
Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage
garden state motorcyle association

#48 chocofoodie

chocofoodie
  • participating member
  • 72 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 26 October 2007 - 04:37 AM

Hello everyone!

Im new to this forum, and chocolate making and baking as well. Thats why I joined this forum, really, because I am in DESPERATE need of help! I cant even make a simple chocolate ganache correctly! My ganache either comes out two thick or to fluid. But I am following the proportions EXACTLY. I am getting super frustrated and was wondering if anyone had any tips or advice, or anything at all that might make me feel better :-)

thanks all!

#49 tammylc

tammylc
  • participating member
  • 2,155 posts
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI

Posted 26 October 2007 - 05:37 AM

"Too thick" or "too fluid" will vary depending on what you want to use your ganache for. Are you making truffle centers, glazing a cake, or something else entirely?

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40


#50 chocofoodie

chocofoodie
  • participating member
  • 72 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 26 October 2007 - 05:43 AM

hi Tammylc,

I am trying to make truffle centers. But when it comes out to fluid I end up using it in molded chocolates because its so loose. Yesterday's batch was thick enough to use for a truffle, but it was still very soft and sticky. Today's batch is much thicker, it gets hard very fast so its hard to even roll it into balls.

When I look at pictures of what a ganache is supposed to look like before it sets, mine is nothing like it. its more dough like right from the beginning.

[quote name='tammylc' date='Oct 26 2007, 01:37 PM']
"Too thick" or "too fluid" will vary depending on what you want to use your ganache for. Are you making truffle centers, glazing a cake, or something else entirely?

#51 tammylc

tammylc
  • participating member
  • 2,155 posts
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI

Posted 26 October 2007 - 05:53 AM

Are you using milk chocolate, dark chocolate, white chocolate? And what kind? Different brands of chocolate will have different amounts of cocoa butter, which will effect viscosity.

The standard ratio for dark chocolate truffle centers is 2 parts chocolate to one part liquifier (combined weight of cream, fruit puree, butter, liqueur). Milk chocolate ratio is more like 1:2.5 (I don't use milk much, so I'm not the best to ask on that one...)

What technique are you using to make your ganache? There are two main techniques described in the Grewling book - 1) finely chop your chocolate, pour your cream over top, let set for a couple of minutes, then stir to emulsify. Or 2) use melted chocolate at temper, pour 105 degree cream over top, stir to emulsify. Either will work. I have made ganache with melted chocolate that is not in temper, but it sets up much faster if you use tempered chocolate.

We might be able to help you more if you posted the formulas you're using. Are you using weight or volume measures?

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40


#52 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,318 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 26 October 2007 - 05:53 AM

What chocolate are you using for your ganache? Do you have a copy of Greweling?

#53 chocofoodie

chocofoodie
  • participating member
  • 72 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 26 October 2007 - 06:20 AM

I do not have Grewling - yet. I ordered it, but it hasnt come yet.

For the last two batches (yesterdays and todays) I am using Callebaut white chocolate. I am trying to make a white chocolate nut truffle. First I pureed my nuts into a paste. Then I microwaved 10 ounces of chocolate til it was fully melted. I mixed the chocolate with about 2.3 ounces of the puree until it was fully mixed. Then I microwaved almost 5 ounces of cream and added it to it. First let me say that I apart from the final ganache result, I have also had horrible emulsion experiences as well. I added the cream here slowly, and it was working out fine, then all of a sudden it broke. So I microwaved another about quarter cup cream and mixed into that an equal amount of my broken ganache and i had to keep adding to that very slowly until it was all done and emulsified. Needless to say, I had very sore wrists. But anyway, then I spread it at the bottom of a tupperware container and left it to set overnight. The next morning I started scooping out balls but it was still rather sticky and soft. but after leaving the balls on the marble slab for a while, they were hard enough on the outside to dip. But I put aside a portion of the ganache, about a half cup, that I wanted to experiment adding more chocolate to. I melted a small amount of chocolate, less than half a cup, and added it. i let that sit again at the bottom of my tupperware. it was rock hard in the morning. so i microwaved it and added 50 ml cream to it, also microwaved. after much work, it became a paste, which i left overnight. TODAY, the mixture was again pretty hard, softer than yesterday, but still to hard to make into balls. so I microwaved it a little and put it into a piping bag and piped it out into rows. I am now going to sit and shape them into balls. (I tried one, and it did shape, with a bit of resistance).

But here's the thing. I took a 2 hour chocolate class, nothing serious or professional or anything, just a fun class. it was an intro to chocolate making and you get to go home with chocolates that 'you' made. In the class, we used one container cream (at room temperature) to two parts melted chocolate (dont know if it was tempered or not, but i am assuming it wasnt because I remember he just popped it in the microwave for this step, then he tempered with us watching after). So we poured the cream into a bowl, then poured in the 2 containers worth of chocolate and mixed it barely, just until the white streaks of cream were gone. It was so easy. I thought, this is great, I can make this so easily at home. Since then I have tried with every type of cream (including the same brand and size he gave us in class) and every type of chocolate and every time it doesnt work!

Sorry about all this, but im sure you can imagine my frustration!
thanks for your help!

#54 chocofoodie

chocofoodie
  • participating member
  • 72 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 26 October 2007 - 06:30 AM

Oh, and about the time we made it in class. The consistency was thicker than plain old melted chocolate, but it was still very 'liquid'. We put it into piping bags and piped long straight lines then we waited ten minutes for them to harden a little before we started rolling them into balls. When we rolled them into balls, it wasnt sticky. it was still kind of wet, you got some chocolate onto your hands, but they were firm and easy to work with. then we dipped them into tempered chocolate and coated them in nuts and things, and the whole time we were using our hands and they held up perfectly.

When I was making mine yesterday, I used a dipping tool, and still some of them were so soft that they were being indented by the tool.

#55 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,318 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 26 October 2007 - 06:35 AM

I can see why you are frustrated.

Working with white chocolate to make ganache is challenging. Your ganaches are often quite soft. You might find it easiest to master dark first.

Greweling suggests having your chocolate tempered first, then adding your cream at 41 degrees C (105 to 106 F). Stir sort of middle of bowl out, contining to stir until you see that glossy emulsion form. I have found this to work very well and they set up amazing fast compared to methods I have used in the past.

Edited by Kerry Beal, 26 October 2007 - 06:36 AM.


#56 tammylc

tammylc
  • participating member
  • 2,155 posts
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI

Posted 26 October 2007 - 07:04 AM

I second everything Kerry says.

In the recipe you described, you used 2 parts white chocolate to 1 part cream to start off. That would be fine for dark chocolate, but will be a very soft ganache for white. If you still want to play with white chocolate, try using a ratio of 3 or even 4 parts of chocolate to the cream.

You will find the Grewling book very helpful once it comes in. He explains things in great detail and includes lots of troubleshooting tips. Try some of his formulas as written first (using the percentages to adapt them to smaller quantities) so you can see how it's supposed to work, then start playing with your own formulas.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40


#57 merlicky

merlicky
  • participating member
  • 100 posts
  • Location:Kalamazoo, MI

Posted 27 October 2007 - 04:54 PM

I also have some ganache questions.

In the Godiva Dark chocolate truffle recipe online they use sugar in their ganache. What is the purpose of the sugar? Does it just add sweetness? If so, then why would you want more sugar in a Dark chocolate truffle since it is dark because of having less sugar in the chocolate?

They also melt the butter in with the cream and sugar before pouring it over the chocolate. Everything I have read says to add the butter later. What effect does the timing of the butter addition have on the ganache?


Thanks,
Mike.

#58 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,318 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 27 October 2007 - 05:06 PM

I also have some ganache questions.

In the Godiva Dark chocolate truffle recipe online they use sugar in their ganache.  What is the purpose of the sugar?  Does it just add sweetness?  If so, then why would you want more sugar in a Dark chocolate truffle since it is dark because of having less sugar in the chocolate?

They also melt the butter in with the cream and sugar before pouring it over the chocolate.  Everything I have read says to add the butter later.  What effect does the timing of the butter addition have on the ganache?


Thanks,
Mike.

View Post

I don't like to add sugars to ganaches because I don't like them to be too sweet. I suppose in addition to sweetness it might increase shelf life by decreasing available water.

I find that adding the room temperature butter to the cooled emulsion means you are less likely to have a film of melted fat form on your ganache as it cools. Melting the butter in with the cream means more fat that has to be incorporated into the emulsion in the initial mixing phase. It certainly can be done, I just find I've had more broken emulsions that way.

#59 sote23

sote23
  • participating member
  • 506 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 27 October 2007 - 11:23 PM

I agree with kerry, white can be difficult to work with. I also recommend you try dark first and once you get some expierence with it, you can try white.

Luis

#60 chickie

chickie
  • participating member
  • 21 posts
  • Location:NH seacoast

Posted 28 October 2007 - 06:37 PM

another person here to say white is diffcult.
Your teacher may have not broken the temper of the chocolate in class when he microwaved it, there is a fairly easy "formula" to melting in the microwave to maintain temper, it has been a long time since I did it but I am sure you could find it (basically small bursts)
You may have problems with your ganache breaking because of the added oil from your nuts. Generally a small amt. of liquid would fix this, but since you are already working with white chocolate adding more iquid is going to cause more thinness issues.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Chocolate