Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Favourite Seattle bakery


  • Please log in to reply
109 replies to this topic

#31 skyflyer3

skyflyer3
  • participating member
  • 248 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 20 September 2005 - 10:12 PM

You can also find Fran's chocolates at Whole Foods in the Udistrict, and Uwajimaya in the International District. I have to say, I don't feel Dilletante's chocolates are up to the quality level of Fran's (disclaimer: I used to work for Fran's, but I also used to work with people who left Dilletante's for Fran's). One thing that is worth trying at the Dillentante Cafe on Broadway is the Coupe Caramel - a caramel sundae that is out-of-this-world! But I prefer Fran's cakes over theirs. Try the tas de noix if you are going to the Fran's store in Uvillage, and the stuffed figs.

I have to second Dahlia bakery - the scones, coconut cream pie and the milk chocolate caramel ice cream are incredible! I'm not fond of the croissants, though - Cafe Besalu, or the excellent Columbia City Bakery folks do them much better. Too bad CC Bakery isn't open yet - they would be well worth any drive, as their pastries and breads are fantastic! Best challah in town. Enjoy your stay, and please do report back on your trip!

Edited to add - I hear Fiori Chocolates, carried by Motore Espresso, are the new up and coming chocolates to eat here in Seattle. They are made by a certified master chocolatier (certied in your Vancouver, no less!) fresh daily. Motore is on Stewart, I believe, which is in the downtown area.

Edited by skyflyer3, 20 September 2005 - 10:14 PM.


#32 MsRamsey

MsRamsey
  • participating member
  • 1,287 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 21 September 2005 - 08:43 AM

I have to say, I don't feel Dilletante's chocolates are up to the quality level of Fran's

View Post


Totally agree. I was hoping someone else would mention it. :smile:
"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."
-- State Senator John Burton, joking about
how the bill to ban production of foie gras in
California was summarized for signing by
Gov. Schwarzenegger.

#33 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 24 September 2005 - 12:01 PM

Thanks for all the recommendations! Here are the pictures and some comments. Enjoy!

This is what I had yesterday:

From Dahlia Bakery

Posted Image
First bite!!
Posted Image
-chocolate eclair, pastry cream flecked with vanilla seeds
Posted Image
Posted Image
-a slice of their famous coconut cream pie (what an amazing crust! Buttery and incredibly flaky!)
Posted Image
(the whole pie)
Posted Image
(they also sell "bites" of the pie...2-3 bite servings)
Posted Image
-their cheesecake (didn't enjoy this so much...I think they use some cinnamon and a lot of nutmeg)
Posted Image
-the most perfect lemon tart with Italian meringue
Posted Image
-a croissant (much better than anything we can get in Vancouver, unfortunately)
Posted Image
-a fruit tart with pastry cream, sponge cake and strawberry jam in a tart crust (glazed sliced plum, blueberries, and strawberry)
Posted Image

Dahlia Bakery was definitely the highlight of my day. I have pictures of all their pastries, and closeups of each of the pastries I ate and listed above. I had all my pastries laid out in front of me on the table outside the bakery. I bet everyone who walked by and stared thought I was a glutton but I didn't care. :wink:

Inside pics of Dahlia:
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

The first thing I tasted was the croissant. My benchmark for comparison is the croissant from Sen5es in Vancouver, which I like very much. I have to say though that the ones they make at Dahlia are even flakier (pretty amazing, especially considering I bought the croissant around 3:30 p.m. in the afternoon--do they bake their croissants throughout the day?)

I admit I can be quite picky when it comes to desserts in general--the ones I buy from the better bakeries here in Vancouver are good, but I've never had something that really blew me away. I'm picky about the things I bake, and I'm picky with the desserts I get at restaurants. But the lemon tart with the Italian meringue--I think this is the best pastry I've ever eaten in my life! The lemon curd had such a fresh tartness, and the pillow of burnished meringue was so thick, creamy, and provided just the right amount of sweetness to counteract the tangy curd. :wub: The shortcrust was good too...but my heart was won over by the flakiest of the pie crust on that coconut cream pie. The only thing that could possibly make that lemon tart better, in my mind, is to have the curd and meringue on that pie crust.

The coconut cream pie was also very tasty. I'm not a huge fan of coconut though, so it wasn't my favourite...but I can imagine why so many people enjoy this pie. (I don't really enjoy the texture of coconut...but I still had to order this since it's a signature item and came so highly recommended by all of you. :smile: ) And that pie crust--I could just cry to think my pie crust pales so poorly in comparison! I've not tasted a better crust than the one on that coconut pie. It was thick, slightly sweet, crisp and browned all the way through :wub:

The fruit tart and the eclair were good. I preferred the eclair, but that's probably just b/c I generally find fruit tarts kind of boring. It was stuffed with the rich pastry cream and the choux pastry was so delicate. The fruit in the tart was very fresh, and I liked how there was sponge cake and a jam layer under the pastry cream.

My least favourite was the cheesecake--I didn't enjoy the nutmeg so much in this dessert. Aside from the nutmeg, it was like any other cheesecake I've made--similar density, similar level of sweetness. The crust was a bit soft, which I don't like.

From Rose's...
-an 8 piece selection of chocolates, a milk chocolate square, and some chocolate-covered candied ginger

(sorry, I ate these before I remembered to take a picture!)

My favourites were the Mexican one with cinnamon, the dark chocolate with sea salt, and the beet-flavoured chocolate. The beet brought a sweet earthiness to the chocolate. My least favourite was TAMARIND...I thought it would be interesting to see how the sourness played with the chocolate, but my palate was not happy with the combination... :wacko: Other than that, the chocolates were good--shells had a nice snap to the tooth, and the chocolates had a long finish.

Rose prefers chocolates made from cocoa beans grown in Madagascar, with the undertones of fruit--just like me! I stayed in her store for about 15 minutes after they closed for the day, talking about chocolate and chocolate desserts. My friend thought it was super geeky. :raz: He bought a selection of the tamer chocolates for his gf...chocolate bourbon, chocolate caramel, chocolate marzipan, chocolate hazelnut, etc.

(I walked around Pike Market for at least 45 minutes asking everyone where I could find Fran's chocolates--I had forgotten where they were sold! The lady at the Information booth thought that perhaps Rose's carried Fran's chocolates, but Rose did not. So instead, I walked away with a selection of Rose's chocolates. I later found out that a few higher-end grocery stores sell Fran's...I'll get those chocolate caramels next time!)

From Macrina Bakery:

Posted Image
- a very big apricot, espresso, and chocolate cookie

Posted Image

(Unfortunately, I got there around 4:15pm and by then, there wasn't much left in the pastry case. There was a Budapest coffeecake, a tart with yogurt and berries, some cookies, brownies, and chocolate peanut butter cupcakes...I chose the cookie b/c the flavours sounded interesting. It was a good and chewy homestyle treat.)

Inside Macrina:

Posted Image

Posted Image

From the Cheesecake Factory (my friend wanted to go...so, you know... :wink: )
Posted Image
-an extremely sweet slice of Toberlone cheesecake with a rosette of chocolate frosting that tastes like the stuff from the Betty Crocker jar *shudder* This was disgusting..... :rolleyes: And over $7 US for this atrocity!
Posted Image

I had an amazing food-filled day in Seattle! (Lunch at Salumi--the porchetta lived up to the hype, definitely. Next time I'm in Salumi, I wouldn't hesitate to order another. Sizable sandwich stuffed with tender pork, onions, and green peppers. And I loved the bread after the porky juice seeps into it. The [i]meat plate
was a nice way to try their salumi. :smile: (for pics, click here:
porchetta and meat plate
Drinks and more food at Zig Zag's later on in the evening rounded out our whirlwind eating extravaganza :laugh: )

Edited by Ling, 24 September 2005 - 10:05 PM.


#34 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 24 September 2005 - 12:08 PM

I have to say, I don't feel Dilletante's chocolates are up to the quality level of Fran's

View Post


Totally agree. I was hoping someone else would mention it. :smile:

View Post


Oh right, I forgot to mention that I also tried Dilletante's at a coffee shop in West Lake mall. The girl behind the counter gave me some samples. They were OK.

Edited by Ling, 24 September 2005 - 12:26 PM.


#35 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 24 September 2005 - 03:36 PM

I have to second Dahlia bakery - the scones, coconut cream pie and the milk chocolate caramel ice cream are incredible!  I'm not fond of the croissants, though - Cafe Besalu, or the excellent Columbia City Bakery folks do them much better. 

View Post


How are the croissants at Cafe Besalu different? I thought the croissant from Dahlia was good, but fully intend on going to Cafe Besalu on my next Seattle trip. :smile:

#36 malarkey

malarkey
  • participating member
  • 1,323 posts
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 25 September 2005 - 09:03 AM

I have to second Dahlia bakery - the scones, coconut cream pie and the milk chocolate caramel ice cream are incredible!  I'm not fond of the croissants, though - Cafe Besalu, or the excellent Columbia City Bakery folks do them much better. 

View Post


How are the croissants at Cafe Besalu different? I thought the croissant from Dahlia was good, but fully intend on going to Cafe Besalu on my next Seattle trip. :smile:

View Post

They are light and crispy/flaky and ohh so buttery. IMO, I'm actually sorta surprised you thought the croissants at Dahlia were better than Senses.. I guess I need to try a Dahlia croissant! I always go for the bread when I'm there. The monthly breads are usually quite good, especially the corn bread which is the August special, sometimes spilling into September. The olive ciabatta is also great.

IMHO, Besalu has the best croissants in Seattle. Be sure to go there next time, and get a ginger biscuit also. Sorry I didn't get to meet you Ling- too many things going on- hopefully NEXT time! (and hopefully next time you'll stay longer!)

Edited by malarkey, 25 September 2005 - 09:04 AM.

Born Free, Now Expensive


#37 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 25 September 2005 - 11:28 AM

Both the croissants frm Sen5es and Dahlia are buttery and flaky, but the ones at Dahlia are a deeper brown (which I really like). I hope I get to meet you next time I'm down! There's so much that I still want to try in Seattle--Le Pichet has been on my list for awhile, and I didn't get to spend nearly enough time at Pike Market!

There were a number of bakeries at Pike Market with delicious-looking baked goods. How is Three Girls Bakery? The things at a Polish (?) bakery looked good too...they had a lot of savoury items in the window.

#38 JasonTrue

JasonTrue
  • participating member
  • 858 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 25 September 2005 - 11:34 AM

I'm quite fond of Piroshky Piroshky, which is a Russian bakery with some American influences (namely, the presence of cheddar cheese, and perhaps the size of their pastries). Another Russian bakery hidden away behind the Sisters German immigrant-run sandwich/salad spot seems to be a little less buttery, but has its charms.

I have taken advantage of rustic loaves from Three Girls from time to time; things there range from adequate to very good.

Both the croissants frm Sen5es and Dahlia are buttery and flaky, but the ones at Dahlia are a deeper brown (which I really like). I hope I get to meet you next time I'm down! There's so much that I still want to try in Seattle--Le Pichet has been on my list for awhile, and I didn't get to spend nearly enough time at Pike Market!

There were a number of bakeries at Pike Market with delicious-looking baked goods. How is Three Girls Bakery? The things at a Polish (?) bakery looked good too...they had a lot of savoury items in the window.

View Post


Jason Truesdell
Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

#39 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 25 September 2005 - 11:39 AM

Yes, that's the place I was thinking about--Piroshky Piroshky. Not familiar with Russian baked goods, but they sure looked good in the window. :smile: That's on my list for my next visit.

#40 skyflyer3

skyflyer3
  • participating member
  • 248 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 25 September 2005 - 09:35 PM

I have to second Dahlia bakery - the scones, coconut cream pie and the milk chocolate caramel ice cream are incredible!  I'm not fond of the croissants, though - Cafe Besalu, or the excellent Columbia City Bakery folks do them much better. 

View Post


How are the croissants at Cafe Besalu different? I thought the croissant from Dahlia was good, but fully intend on going to Cafe Besalu on my next Seattle trip. :smile:

View Post

They are light and crispy/flaky and ohh so buttery. IMO, I'm actually sorta surprised you thought the croissants at Dahlia were better than Senses.. I guess I need to try a Dahlia croissant! I always go for the bread when I'm there. The monthly breads are usually quite good, especially the corn bread which is the August special, sometimes spilling into September. The olive ciabatta is also great.

IMHO, Besalu has the best croissants in Seattle. Be sure to go there next time, and get a ginger biscuit also. Sorry I didn't get to meet you Ling- too many things going on- hopefully NEXT time! (and hopefully next time you'll stay longer!)

View Post



Yeah, I think the croissants from Dahlia are a little dry when I've tried them. Besalu does them very flaky and light - they are a standard when it comes to croissants. But Columbia City Bakery has flavor and flakiness, which is why I prefer theirs over Besalu's. They are very close to the ones made by Ken's Artisan Bakery in Portland, which are my favorite.

#41 kiliki

kiliki
  • participating member
  • 1,090 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 26 September 2005 - 10:42 AM

The sweet baked goods at Piroshky Piroshky are along the lines of cinnamon rolls-they are yeasted doughs with things like apples and cinnamon. Not bad, but not in the league of Dahlia. The savory items are good for a cheap lunch.

#42 tsquare

tsquare
  • participating member
  • 2,581 posts

Posted 26 September 2005 - 01:47 PM

Completely forgot to add Gelatiamo (at 3rd and Union) to the list. They have very Italian type pastry, including cream filled croissant (okay, cornetto?). A lot is hit and miss, but the gelato is good and the cookies are very good most of the time.

#43 JasonTrue

JasonTrue
  • participating member
  • 858 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 26 September 2005 - 01:56 PM

I wouldn't claim that they are serving haute cuisine or even particularly elegant breads, but based on my experiences in Vancouver, I'd say it would be hard to find an equivalent there. The Russian immigration wave in the late 80s-90s that hit Bellevue and Seattle had a slightly lighter impact on Vancouver.

This place is about comfort... a little borscht and sour cream, and a nice savory bun...

The sweet baked goods at Piroshky Piroshky are along the lines of cinnamon rolls-they are yeasted doughs with things like apples and cinnamon. Not bad, but not in the league of Dahlia. The savory items are good for a cheap lunch.

View Post


Jason Truesdell
Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

#44 MGLloyd

MGLloyd
  • participating member
  • 630 posts
  • Location:Mill Creek, Washington USA

Posted 26 September 2005 - 06:16 PM

The recipe for the Dahlia triple coconut cream pie is commonly available on the Net; do a Google for 'Tom Douglas triple coconut cream pie recipe'. The pie crust is a pretty typical crust recipe, but includes 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut. The toasted coconut chips and white chocolate shavings over the top sets the pie off nicely.

Edited by MGLloyd, 26 September 2005 - 08:47 PM.


Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

#45 Terrasanct

Terrasanct
  • participating member
  • 624 posts
  • Location:Montana

Posted 26 September 2005 - 07:47 PM

I'll have to try some of these places when I'm there. I'm surprised to hear that Fran's is better than Dilletante. I haven't had Fran's for years but wasn't that impressed. Have they changed, or is it just me?

You know...if you Seattleites just let us here in Montana take a mere 10% of your good bakeries and stores, I'm sure you wouldn't miss them.

#46 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 26 September 2005 - 08:58 PM

The recipe for the Dahlia triple coconut cream pie is commonly available on the Net; do a Google for 'Tom Douglas triple coconut cream pie recipe'.  The pie crust is a pretty typical crust recipe, but includes 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut.  The toasted coconut chips and white chocolate shavings over the top sets the pie off nicely.

View Post


I searched quite a few sites for the pie crust recipe...all I came across are the coconut filling recipes for the Dahlia coconut pie. Maybe I should just add 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut to my pie crust recipe? (I use lard.)

Edited by Ling, 26 September 2005 - 08:58 PM.


#47 JasonTrue

JasonTrue
  • participating member
  • 858 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 26 September 2005 - 10:17 PM

The main thing I like about Fran's is the intensity of the chocolate, and the relatively light touch with sugar. The only chocolate that consistently wows me more than Fran's is La Maison du Chocolat, which requires mail order or a trip to San Francisco, New York, Tokyo, or Paris to taste.

A lot of things go into the chocolate experience.... they need to come up to room temperature to have ideal taste, and the lower-sugar chocolates have a very short shelf life, so they generally need to be stored chilled but not frozen.

Dillettante tempers their chocolate a bit differently and uses a somewhat heavier hand with the sugar, so I don't find them quite as exciting. That being said, I do enjoy the bittersweet version of their Ephemere truffle sauce, and a few of their cakes are quite nice. I used to be a bit addicted to one of their varieties of chocolate covered espresso beans (a rarity for me since I find most companies' interpretations of them less than exciting).

I'll have to try some of these places when I'm there.  I'm surprised to hear that Fran's is better than Dilletante.  I haven't had Fran's for years but wasn't that impressed.  Have they changed, or is it just me?

You know...if you Seattleites just let us here in Montana take a mere 10% of your good bakeries and stores, I'm sure you wouldn't miss them.

View Post


Jason Truesdell
Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

#48 MsRamsey

MsRamsey
  • participating member
  • 1,287 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 27 September 2005 - 07:03 AM

Dilettante is merely adequate compared to Fran's. Fran's chocolates are much more refined and of higher quality. I can't remember what kind of chocolate Dilettante is using, but I remember that it wasn't anything great. Also, the way they both run their businesses has influenced my opinion. That restaurant on Broadway is a trainwreck.

Edited by MsRamsey, 27 September 2005 - 07:07 AM.

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."
-- State Senator John Burton, joking about
how the bill to ban production of foie gras in
California was summarized for signing by
Gov. Schwarzenegger.

#49 MGLloyd

MGLloyd
  • participating member
  • 630 posts
  • Location:Mill Creek, Washington USA

Posted 27 September 2005 - 09:21 AM

I searched quite a few sites for the pie crust recipe...all I came across are the coconut filling recipes for the Dahlia coconut pie. Maybe I should just add 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut to my pie crust recipe? (I use lard.)


Here is the ingredients list for the coconut pie shell. As you can see, a pretty typical pie crust recipe that uses all butter, 1/2 cup coconut and two tsp. sugar. When I make this pie, I use my own favorite pie crust recipe (the one that has some white vinegar in it) and merely add the coconut to it. I like my crust better.

1 cup plus 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut
1/2 cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut
into 1/2-inch dice
2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp kosher salt
1/3 cup ice water, or more as needed

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

#50 Terrasanct

Terrasanct
  • participating member
  • 624 posts
  • Location:Montana

Posted 27 September 2005 - 09:26 AM

I've mostly just bought the seconds at Dilletante. They taste just as good and the price is better. I'll make a point of comparing Frans and Dilletante when I go there. I do like lower sugar, more chocolately chocolates.

I do enjoy the bittersweet version of their Ephemere truffle sauce


I was going to mention that. It's really hard to beat this stuff. I just finished the bottle I bought in April (showing a lot of restraint) so I'll need to pick up some more.

#51 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 27 September 2005 - 11:00 AM

I searched quite a few sites for the pie crust recipe...all I came across are the coconut filling recipes for the Dahlia coconut pie. Maybe I should just add 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut to my pie crust recipe? (I use lard.)


Here is the ingredients list for the coconut pie shell. As you can see, a pretty typical pie crust recipe that uses all butter, 1/2 cup coconut and two tsp. sugar. When I make this pie, I use my own favorite pie crust recipe (the one that has some white vinegar in it) and merely add the coconut to it. I like my crust better.

1 cup plus 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut
1/2 cup (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut
into 1/2-inch dice
2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp kosher salt
1/3 cup ice water, or more as needed

View Post


Thanks! I might just add the sweetened coconut to my recipe, which includes lard, a beaten egg, and vinegar. I also use some sugar in my recipe, to boost flavour and add in browning.

#52 VibeGuy

VibeGuy
  • participating member
  • 32 posts
  • Location:Greater Frelard By Day / Bainbridge By Night

Posted 27 September 2005 - 03:07 PM

I'm as much of a fan of lard in pie crusts as anyone....but unless I've rendered my own, I think most of it is too "porky" for non-savory pies....

but....

What about using some palm kernel or coconut oil as the second non-butter fat?

Eric, Who Wishes He Did *NOT* Know About The Ham/Swiss Danish-thingie at Besalu

#53 tsquare

tsquare
  • participating member
  • 2,581 posts

Posted 19 December 2005 - 10:40 AM

Gelatiamo (3rd and Union) got a new pastry case and the items inside look like presents - large and small. Gelato cakes, chocolate mousse cups, semifredo...they have really grown as a specialty shop. All made on premises.

Edited by tsquare, 19 December 2005 - 10:41 AM.


#54 kiliki

kiliki
  • participating member
  • 1,090 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 19 December 2005 - 02:31 PM

Has anyone tried them? I haven't had pastries from Gelatiamo in a couple of years, but I wasn't impressed then.

#55 tsquare

tsquare
  • participating member
  • 2,581 posts

Posted 20 December 2005 - 09:14 AM

Has anyone tried them? I haven't had pastries from Gelatiamo in a couple of years, but I wasn't impressed then.

View Post


I have tried many. They don't make me crave pastry (thankfully since they are too close), but they do a good job with cookies and tarts, and breakfast pastry. And gelato - they have the caldo right now, which I am not greatly fond of, but might strike a chord for some - kind of mousse like, not so cold. They also are baking panettone. I like the small cookies best. Some just melt in your mouth. These are Italian, not French or American type sweets.

#56 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 05 April 2006 - 12:27 PM

I am in Seattle again tomorrow! I might stop by Essential Baking Company, as I loved the bread they served at Union. (It had a very crunchy crust--much better than any of the bread I can get in Vancouver.)

Looking forward to trying their pastries...any favourites?

#57 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 05 April 2006 - 01:26 PM

Whoa, that was quick! If you're taking bread home, I love the Rosemary Diamante, the Walnut boule, and the La Scala semolina with sesame. I've never had any of their pastries. Sorry, heresy, I know.

#58 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 05 April 2006 - 02:09 PM

^I am just stopping by en route to my trip tp San Fran!

I am doing a croissant-run tomorrow instead. Hope to hit up Cafe Besalu, Le Panier, and some other bakeries for a comparison. :smile:

#59 little ms foodie

little ms foodie
  • participating member
  • 3,063 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 05 April 2006 - 02:23 PM

Besalu is just down the road from our house and it is the best!!

Grand Central in Pioneer Square would also make a good stop for comparison round ups!

#60 skyflyer3

skyflyer3
  • participating member
  • 248 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 05 April 2006 - 02:25 PM

Ling - Do try to hit Sweet and Savory in Mount Baker:

http://seattlebonviv.../post.html#more

I'm in love with this place, it's so good. The owner has done pastry for 20 years, studied in Paris. I would hit Columbia City Bakery, too, but I like Sweet and Savory better, now.

Are you going to stop in Portland, too? If so, Ken's Bakery (on 21st, I think, Downtown) is a must-visit. They have the best croissants outside of Paris. And their bread! I'm so glad they're down there, or I'd be so fat.