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The Pecan Pie Topic

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#1 phaelon56

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 10:15 AM

I'm preparing for my annual holiday pie baking (I only make pies twice per year). I'm generally okay with the crust method I've been using - "Pie Crust Sticks" and I add a spoonful of orange juice in place of part of the water. Works really well and I plan to continue unless you folks can convince me that I'll get a truly superior crust if I make it from scratch (I'm open to discussion but please note that I have no mixer or food processor if that makes a difference).

Here's the focus of my problem: in an effort to make a pecan pie that stands out from the ordinary and has a truly rich flavor to the filling, I've been experimenting with ingredient variations. For starters, I use 1/2 dark karo syrup and 1/2 light rather than all light syrup. I've also been replacing about 1/3 to 1/2 of the total amount of Karo syrup with real maple syrup for richer flavor. I have also been replacing the refined white sugar with dark brown sugar. People absolutely love the pies - the flavor is richer and more intense than a traditional pecan pie but I have a problem with consistency - the filling tends to stay a bit towards the liquid side.

I recognize that the maple syrup won't "set" or thicken in the same way as the Karo syrup. Should I reduce the proportion of maple syrup or can someone suggest a way overcome this obstacle. Also.... is the use of dark brown sugar impacting on this in any way? Would using turbinado raw sugar perhaps be a better way to get a richer sugar taste but possibly with better results?

Any and all suggestions appreciated. TIA!

#2 bripastryguy

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 12:01 PM

I usually use small amounts of maple syrup and molasses. It gives the deep rich flavor you are looking for and sets nicely.
Here is the recipe I use (I don't know the yield because all pie and tart pans are different)


Pecan Pie

Recipe By :Brian Fishman
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
20 Whole eggs
2 1/2 cups Corn syrup
1 lb. 10 oz. Sugar
1 1/2 oz. ounces All Purpose Flour
1/2 cup Molasses
1/4 cup Maple syrup
1 1/4 pounds Butter -- melted

In the mixer whisk the eggs smooth( DO NOT WHIP TOO MUCH AIR INTO IT! Just whisk to break up. Add the corn syrup, sugar, flour, molasses and maple syrup. Pour in the warm melted butter. Bake in partially baked shells until set. Cool completely before cutting.
"Chocolate has no calories....
Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence
SWEET KARMA DESSERTS
www.sweetkarmadesserts.com
550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554
516-794-4478
Brian Fishman

#3 Dave the Cook

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 12:16 PM

                              Pecan Pie

Recipe By     :Brian Fishman
 Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
 20                    Whole eggs
 2 1/2         cups  Corn syrup
 1 lb. 10 oz.      Sugar
 1 1/2 oz.             ounces  All Purpose Flour
 1/2           cup  Molasses
 1/4           cup  Maple syrup
 1 1/4         pounds  Butter -- melted

In the mixer whisk the eggs smooth( DO NOT WHIP TOO MUCH AIR INTO IT! Just whisk to break up. Add the corn syrup, sugar, flour, molasses and maple syrup. Pour in the warm melted butter. Bake in partially baked shells until set. Cool completely before cutting.

A nine-inch pie shell holds about 4-1/2 cups, so I'm guessing it might make 4 pies--if you added some pecans. :wink:

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#4 phaelon56

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 12:31 PM

Good ideas - thanks. This should be about the right amount, as I'm making four pies. They'll be in the disposable 10" pie tins but these are the deeper type that is now available. Any opinions on the turbinado sugar? I've recently been using a dash of it in my espresso and really prefer it to regular refined white sugar. It seems to have a different and more natural sweetness. Would it be a waste to use it in the pie due to the presence of stronger, heavier flavors and sweetness from the other ingredients?

#5 Jaymes

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 04:57 PM

Here's mine:

Southern Bourbon-Pecan Pie

Put 1T of molasses and/or 2T of maple syrup into measuring cup
Add dark Karo Syrup (or Blue Ribbon Cane) to make 1 Cup
1/2 C white sugar
1/2 C dark brown sugar
1/3 C melted butter
3 T bourbon (or 2 t vanilla if you don't like bourbon)
4 eggs, beaten until mixed but not frothy
1 1/2 C pecan pieces

Combine syrups and sugars and mix well. Add butter and bourbon. Stir in eggs and combine well.

In bottom of pie shell scatter pecan pieces. Pour pie filling over. Bake 350º for 35-45 minutes. Pie is done when center no longer ripples in middle when moved. Cool well before serving.

This makes enough for a big pie (10"). If I haven't made a shell that large, I just pour the leftover filling into a smaller pan and bake one sans crust.

Edited by Jaymes, 09 December 2002 - 05:18 PM.

"And you, you're just a stinker."

#6 Peter B Wolf

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 06:06 PM

For me being German, and as a kid never knowing Pecans, the following recipe suits me just fine, it sh.opuld serve others also.

Cider Pecan Tart


Time: 1 hour
2 1/2 cups fresh apple cider
4 tablespoons butter
2/3 cup light brown sugar
2 tablespoons Calvados, bourbon or brandy
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
3 eggs, lightly beaten
Pastry for 8- or 9-inch tart or pie (see recipe)
1 1/2 cups pecan halves, lightly toasted
1 cup heavy cream, whipped (optional).
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place cider in a saucepan, and cook over high heat until reduced to one cup. Remove from heat, and stir in butter and brown sugar until dissolved. Then stir in Calvados, vanilla, nutmeg and eggs.
2. Roll out pastry and line straight-sided tart pan with it. Pie pan can be used. Spread pecans over pastry.
3. Pour in cider mixture. Bake 30 to 35 minutes, until surface is fairly firm and pastry is golden. Allow to cool to room temperature. Serve with whipped cream, if desired.
Yield: 6 to 8 servings.
Peter

#7 Jaymes

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 06:11 PM

I gotta tell ya, PBW, that looks absolutely wonderful. :rolleyes:
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#8 phaelon56

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 06:36 PM

It sure does.... I think I'm gonna try making two of those and two pecan pies instead of just the pies this year.

#9 Jaymes

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 06:42 PM

It sure does.... I think I'm gonna try making two of those and two pecan pies instead of just the pies this year.

For your two pies, P56, I'd suggest you take a look at my recipe. I've been making it for many years with great success. My recipe seems to address all of the issues you mentioned in your original post.

Edit: Also, if you're more interested in having your pie cut evenly, use pecan bits and pieces. If you're more interested in having the whole pie look gorgeous, use pecan halves, and turn them all over "pretty side up" after you pour in your filling and they float to the top.
:rolleyes:

Edited by Jaymes, 09 December 2002 - 06:45 PM.

"And you, you're just a stinker."

#10 jaybee

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 07:05 PM

Also, if you're more interested in having your pie cut evenly, use pecan bits and pieces


Or you could arrange pecan halves in straight rows radiating out from the center with small "aisles" between them for slicing. :biggrin:
--Tip from SNL's anal retentive chef

#11 jaybee

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 08:02 PM

Oh well, to get back on topic, do you prefer vanilla ice cream, creme fraiche or whipped cream with your pecan pie? Or just neat slices?

#12 Jaymes

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 08:08 PM

darn, how can I edit a quote

Yep. Gotcha! But you're such a grand fellow... it'll just be our little secret from here on out. :biggrin:

And, the pecan pie is so rich, I really like it pretty much as is.... Although a little whipped cream - with a touch of maple syrup added is nice.

:rolleyes:

Edited by Jaymes, 09 December 2002 - 08:11 PM.

"And you, you're just a stinker."

#13 mixmaster b

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Posted 09 December 2002 - 09:52 PM

Pecan Pie is my favorite; I am really excited to try Jaymes' recipe! I alsways mess with my recipes to add bourbon and maple syrup, but I have had consistency trouble. I will try this recipe for sure! Thanks. :biggrin:

And for me, a dollop of whipped cream, no sugar. Mmmmm... PIE!

#14 malarkey

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Posted 23 December 2002 - 12:46 PM

If you've never tried creme fraiche with pecan pie, I'd urge everyone to do this. the flavor combo is incredible.

especially good with a maple syrup pie ;-)

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#15 phaelon56

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Posted 02 January 2003 - 02:56 PM

Well folks.... the verdict is in. I made the pies and used Brian Fishman's recipe but in retrospect think I should have tried Jaymes' recipe instead. Being in a friend's kitchen that was seriously underequipped, I had to resort to using a one pint beer glass and a small juice glass for liquid measurements. I just winged it on what 1 1/2 oz of flour should be. Here are my observations and the variations I imposed:

Used light brown sugar rather than refined sugar. I used dark brown sugar in previous years and will return to it as the flavor/sweetness is more robust.

Used 1/2 light karo syrup and 1/2 dark. This was okay.

The molasses was too strong. I used the designated amount (perhaps a tad less) and the flavor was very pronounced. I added some vanilla but the molasses overpowered it.

The flour should be added to the melted butter and thoroughly dissolved in it before adding the butter to the other ingredients. I screwed up royally on this and was able to work my way out of it but with difficulty.

The recipe turned out to be a bit more than four pies. I was using the 10" disposable tie tins that are a bit deeper than than the 9" disposables, in addition to being wider. I used a generous amount pecans (perhaps a bit too much) and ended up with enough mix left over for one extra 9" pie (after the four 10" tins were filled). Not wanting to visit the store for more crust making materials, I whipped up a brown sugar, butter and quick cook oats crust. Result? Not bad but regular flaky pie crust is far better.

Used ceramic pie balls this year when prebaking the crusts and also put on crust protectors when baking the pies. This REALLY helps the consistency and quality of the crust.

Overall: The filling set well.... perhaps was a bit too firm, the crust was great and the flavor was good but it was lighter sweetness than I like it to be (likely due to not using dark brown sugar) and the molasses flavor was distracting. I'd cut down the molasses to 1/4 of the suggested amount or leave it out entirely.

#16 Jaymes

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Posted 02 January 2003 - 05:28 PM

Well folks.... the verdict is in. I made the pies and used Brian Fishman's recipe but in retrospect think I should have tried Jaymes' recipe instead.  Being in a friend's kitchen that was seriously underequipped, I had to resort to using a one pint beer glass and a small juice glass for liquid measurements. I just winged it on what 1 1/2 oz of flour should be.

Well, I can only tell you that I've been making my recipe for years, and it usually comes out pretty good.

But, given the handicap you were working under, wouldn't guarantee it there! :wacko:

If you do decide to try it sometime soon, please be sure to let me know! :rolleyes:
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#17 bripastryguy

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Posted 02 January 2003 - 06:02 PM

Sorry your pies didnt turn out the way you had hoped.

I learned that recipe for seasoned baker in Virginia, when I worked in DC.

You can totally omit the molasses. Weighing is key in baking and pastry, if you try and wing it you're only asking for trouble.

We used to bake then in the really deep fluted tart pans. low temperature for quite a long time, they should still be a little "jiggly" when pulled from the oven or the filling tends to be gooey. Also, if you put too much pecans in you are not leaving enough room for the mix, it will fall apart because there is nothing holding it together.

Sorry again............
"Chocolate has no calories....
Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence
SWEET KARMA DESSERTS
www.sweetkarmadesserts.com
550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554
516-794-4478
Brian Fishman

#18 Jaymes

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Posted 05 January 2003 - 08:37 PM

Sorry your pies didn't turn out the way you had hoped.

I learned that recipe for seasoned baker in Virginia, when I worked in DC.

BPGuy - don't feel one bit bad - given the circumstances under which he was working, I suspect ANY recipe would have turned out less-than-perfect! :wacko:

And bully for you, P56, for soldiering on despite the "battlefield conditions." I'm sure many of us (me included) would have just thrown our hands into the air and not even attempted it!
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#19 peppyre

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 04:46 PM

I am searching for a to die for recipe for Chocolate Pecan Pie. I'm planning on cooking dinner for a second date and his favorite dessert is a very rich, gooey chocolate pecan pie from a local dessert shop. I figured this would be a good way to keep him around for a while. I've done a search on RecipeGullet and googled away, but alas, no results. All suggestions appreciated....oh and wish me luch :biggrin:

#20 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 05:23 PM

I have made this with much success. :biggrin: but you might want to look at this as well.
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#21 albert_crowley

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 08:07 PM

I'm a real chocolate lover, but I also like pecan pie quite a bit. One Thanksgiving, my sister made the best pecan pie I ever ate. It was exactly the same recipe that she always used except that she poured a 1/4 inch thick layer of melted chocolate over the crust before putting in the pecan filling. After the pie was cooled she drizzeled a small amount of chocolate on the top in a decorative pattern.

She thought it had too much chocolate, but I thought it was just perfect. If he really likes chocolate (or at least as much as I like chocolate), doing this will improve whatever recipe you end up making.

-Al

#22 amccomb

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 08:30 PM

I am of the group that loves chocolate, and loves pecan pie (probably my favorite dessert, actually) but does not like them together!

That said, I have heard the recipe for chocolate pecan pie in Alice Medrich's Bittersweet is very good.

#23 Redsugar

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Posted 06 September 2004 - 05:00 AM

A Chocolate-Pecan Pie custom-baked for a second date…lucky chap!

I have baked a couple versions of this pie. But to elevate these two classics to a higher echelon, consider (perhaps for a later get-together) the presentation of a Caramel-Pecan Black Bottom Pie. This morning, I’m not up to typing in the full set of instructions; however, here’s an outline: Prebake a buttery 9-inch crust that’s been scented w/ vanilla. Powdered gelatin is softened/bloomed over brandy & vanilla. Next, 5 oz. chopped chocolate is readied. Sugar, cornstarch, salt are placed in a saucepan. Whisk in lt. cream & egg yolks to make smooth custard. Temper and incorporate choc. Add gelatin mixture to hot custard. Spread this filling in prepared crust. Refrigerate. Then make a caramel topping of sugar, water, heavy cream, butter...and, of course, roasted pecans. Cool the topping, stirring so that it doesn’t set. Spoon it over the filling. Chill until toppin is set and then pour the Cajun coffee!

#24 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 06 September 2004 - 08:27 AM

I've used a couple recipes published by Karo Syrup in womens magazines over the years. Their pecan and chocolate pecan pies are very easy and delish.

Heres their recipe: the photo above the recipe is of a plain pecan pie. Their chocolate pecan pie is much darker.

http://www.karosyrup...p?recipe_id=496

You also can add chocolate chips to a standard pecan pie recipe for a nice taste. That way you get little chocolate bursts and not too much chocolate.

#25 techno foodie

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Posted 12 November 2004 - 08:12 AM

I've been a lurker on this forum for quite some time (and have found some amazing recipes - thanks SO much for sharing), but I'm finally coming out of the woodwork for one, simple reason:

I'm looking for the be-all, end-all pecan pie recipe.

I've tried tons of them, and all of them seem to be similar - overly sweet and with no real flavor. I'm looking for a recipe that has a rich and buttery filling, with an almost caramel-like flavor.

Thanks in advance for your help! :)
Bryan Ochalla, a.k.a. "Techno Foodie"
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Orson Welles (1915 - 1985)

#26 Swisskaese

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Posted 12 November 2004 - 08:38 AM

Dean Fearing's pecan pie is amazing:

Dean Fearing's Pecan Pie

#27 Redsugar

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Posted 12 November 2004 - 09:40 AM

In my work, I have generally baked these four Pecan Pie recipes.

A simple, straightforward tart: 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar, pinch salt, 4 oz. melted butter, 12 fl. oz. corn syrup, 2 cups pecans, and 2 tsp vanilla extract. Using a 9" sweet-pastry shell.

A Louisiana Sweet Potato-Pecan Pie in which 2 eggs are whisked into a syrup,then poured over the filling before baking. Served w/ a drizzle of caramel sauce and a dollop of whipped cream.

A hedonistic Chocolate-Bourbon Pecan Pie.

And that old faithful – Texas Osgood Pie.
"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

#28 Timh

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Posted 12 November 2004 - 09:36 PM

Try these; Sub pecans for walnuts

Swiss Walnut Tart
375 1 hr.

Buiscuit: Butter125g
Sugar75g
yolk1g
egg1
flour250g
salt3+g (more if you like that salt/caramel thing)

Filling: Walnuts200g
sugar100g
honey150g
milk100cc
cream100cc
salt3g
butter25g
Cook to 107-sugsr,honey,dairy,salt
Add-walnuts and butter, remove and cool

Roll dough to 3mm thick, lay bottom in greases 7in. or rectangle
add filling
add top layer of dough, crimp
chill, then bake

Enjoy.

Edited by Timh, 12 November 2004 - 09:38 PM.


#29 Fernwood

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 09:23 AM

Dean Fearing's pecan pie is amazing:

Dean Fearing's Pecan Pie

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Swisskaese,
Thanks for the link. I'm wondering if you have that Fearing recipe recorded in/from another source. If so, could you please check the pastry ingredients? The recipe at the link describes an 8" shell, but lists 3 cups of flour, which I find improbable. :unsure: Of course, I might try his filling in my own crust, anyway, but I'd love to have the correct version of the Fearing one.
Thanks, Fern

#30 Swisskaese

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 10:11 AM

Here is ingredients for pie crust for another one of his pies. It is for a 10-in pie crust.

Pie Shell
4 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature
1-1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1-1/2 tablespoons sugar
1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons ice water





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