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Cornbread [MERGED TOPIC]

Bread

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78 replies to this topic

#31 tryska

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 12:47 PM

i prefer a lightly sweet cornbread. not corn-muffin sweet, but just sweet enough that you don't taste baking soda.

#32 tejon

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 01:31 PM

Thank you, ruthcooks. Since I have absolutely no ties to the south, I can admit I really prefer sweet cornbread :biggrin:
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#33 fifi

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 01:44 PM

ruthcooks, thanks for that sweet cornbread recipe. Would you be willing to put it in RecipeGullet? Since it is an heirloom recipe, a preamble regarding its origin would preserve the history as well.

I actually like the sweeter, lighter texture bread on occasion. Would I eat it with chili or pinto beans? Probably not. But I do enjoy it as a side to, for instance, a "leftover meat" dinner salad with a tart vinagrette. We used to do this a lot for weekday dinners when my son lived with me. But, I have to confess that I defaulted to Jiffy Mix muffins because I really didn't have a recipe I was crazy about.
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#34 bleachboy

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 02:27 PM

This is my grandmother's cornbread recipe. As far as I'm concerned, it's unparallelled.

2 eggs
1 cup flour
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. soda
3 tbsp. sugar
3/4 tsp. salt
2/3 cup yellow corn meal
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup butter

Beat the eggs. Sift the dry ingredients and add alternately with the buttermilk to the egg mixture. Add the melted butter. Lightly grease an 8 X 8 Pyrex pan (or black skillet -- I prefer the skillet). Pour batter into pan and bake at 400 degrees for 25 minutes (or until golden brown on top.)

Note: Cornbread batter just needs to be lightly stirred together---but NOT mixed with an electric mixer.

Also, if you have some cornbread leftovers, place in foil and re-heat in oven the next day.
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#35 tryska

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 02:34 PM

sweet cornbread goes good with barbecue.

#36 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 16 August 2004 - 10:25 PM

I prefer my honey corn muffins...I've never tried them as a large pan loaf, but they make fine mini-loaves (6x3 size pans). The recipe is here:

http://www.well.com/...ornMuffins.html

I like them for breakfast, with chili, with tomato-basil soup....

#37 ruthcooks

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 02:19 PM

Recipe posted as requested. Enjoy.
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#38 andiesenji

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 06:16 PM

Here is the recipe for the fermented corn mash cornbread I promised.

UNCLE "HAT'S" SOURED CORNBREAD
This "receipt" is from Uncle "Hat" Elam an itenerant Pentecostal preacher who hiked through the Appalachians and Ozarks bringing the "Word of God" to the hill folks, many who supported themselves by cooking 'shine.
(Uncle Hat was named Hatshepsut by his mother who did not realize this Pharaoh was a woman- she just liked the name having first heard it from a newsreader/traveling vendor of household items and books and then reading it in a book about Egypt.)
Uncle Hat's sister Meratmeri (another Egyptian name) married one of my great-uncles.
Uncle Hat remained a batchelor until he was near 60 and traveled to the Florida panhandle to bring back a young relative who had run away from a military school in Albany, Georgia, and who was hiding out in the Florida woods. In Tallahassee Uncle Hat stayed at a boarding house run by a widow "of a certain age" and fell in love first with her pineapple upside-down cake and then with her. He courted her for almost a year and finally convinced her to marry him. They enjoyed 37 years of married bliss until they died within a few months of each other -he at 98 and she at 91.

As Uncle Hat told it, sometimes he would arrive at a 'stead in the mountains and the family would not have enough cornmeal to make enough bread for company. The man of the house would go off into the woods and return with a pot of "workin" mash and this would be incorporated into the cornbread to stretch it so there would be enough for the family and for company. Uncle Hat felt it was so tasty he did the unthinkable when he returned home and invaded the kitchen and experimented under the eye of his mother and sisters until he worked out the following recipe and for the rest of his life he was proud to make the cornbread for every company meal and also when visiting family and friends.
(other than that he would not set foot in a kitchen)

Pour 3 cups spring water into a 2 or 3 quart pot, add 1-1/2 teaspoons salt and bring it to a rolling boil. Gradually stir in 1-1/2 cups white water-ground cornmeal and cook till it is a medium-thick mush.
Remove from heat and immediately stir in 1/2 cup of sugar and 1/4 cup of lard (or solid shortening such as Crisco - don't use butter) and enough additional cornmeal to make a fairly stiff batter. It should not be dry, but the (wooden) spoon should stand up in the batter.
Pour the hot batter into a scalded glazed crock (or ceramic bowl) and cover with a (glass or ceramic plate or glass or stainless steel pot lid) but do not seal it tight, (be sure to scald the bowl and the lid).
Allow to set at room temperature for two to four days, until it ferments - this goes quicker in the summer. It should look bubbly and have a distinct aroma and smell faintly of alcohol. You won't have to remove the lid to scent it, the gases should be able to escape from the pot, thus the loose fitting lid. Caution: If you cover this tightly, the pressure can blow the lid off the crock and will shatter a glass jar.
At the end of this time, stir together 1 cup buttermilk with 1/2 cup fresh cornmeal and 1/2 teaspoon fresh bakin' "sody", stir into the 'workin' mixture.
Heat oven to 400, put 2 tablespoons lard (or shortening) in an iron skillet (10 inch) place in oven till the fat is very hot.
Pour the batter into the skillet (it should sizzle) and bake till a straw comes out clean, (about 30 minutes).

Yield, 8 servings.
SUBMITTED BY: Andie Paysinger
SOURCE: Andie's Uncle Hat Elam, an original recipe.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#39 Carrot Top

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 09:39 PM

Wonderful story, andiesenji, and will try the recipe. I wonder if the mash...as it is creating a natural yeast...makes the cornbread light...

#40 Smithy

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 10:53 AM

Andie, that is a terrific story and a very interesting recipe! Thanks for posting both!
I'm going to have to try that recipe, now while it's still (what passes for) warm here.

Isn't it cool to have colorful family and good stories from them?

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#41 andiesenji

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 11:13 AM

Wonderful story, andiesenji, and will try the recipe. I wonder if the mash...as it is creating a natural yeast...makes the cornbread light...

According to a friend who dabbles in nutritional studies (actually works for a super-premium dog food company), the partial fermentation of the cornmeal mash breaks down some of the starches converts them to sugars and makes it easier to digest and also to bind with other amino acids. Combined with beans it will produce a nearly complete amino acid chain which can substitute for animal protein.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#42 andiesenji

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 11:25 AM

Isn't it cool to have colorful family and good stories from them?

I have an extremely colorful family, many of whom where quite elderly when I was a child and all great story tellers, that being the days prior to TV, we made our own entertainment.
My grandfather was the head of a very large extended family, all living together in an enormous house. I was born before WWII and my dad and all my uncles were away in the service so all my aunts and my 9 cousins, all boys, lived with grandpa and grandma, great grandmama and my great uncles and their wives and families.
We were a village all by ourselves and quite self-sufficient.

Then there were many close family friends, some famous, some infamous, and it seemed that all of them were devoted to the enjoyment of good food. This was the foundation of my interest in food.
Many of my family kept journals and the family still has all of them. They are a great source of stories, recipes and practical knowledge of earlier times.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#43 arjay

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 03:09 PM

Thank you, ruthcooks. Since I have absolutely no ties to the south, I can admit I really prefer sweet cornbread  :biggrin:


Cornbread with any more than one tbsp. of sugar per batch aint cornbread. It must be referred to as "cake" or "dessert". It's the law.
Martinis don't come from vodka and bacon don't come from turkeys!

#44 rotuts

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:55 AM

Ive tried hard to find a Cornbread thread.  ive seen stuff in baking  ...

 

Im hoping serious students of the CB might add their  ( constructive ) thoughts here.

 

granted CB is a Hot Topic, im looking for guidance from people here at eG that love the stuff and 

 

whip it up at a moments notice.

 

I used to bake it often, sometimes with a bit of green chili, sometimes with a bit of granulated sugar sprinkled on the top for a bit of crunch.

 

Now i have my BV XL  Ill use that in my studies and hope for the best.

 

pointing out that Im starting fresh, less than 'scratch' Ill use TJ's cornbread mix as the starting point.

 

I also recall that Test kitchen might have done this recently and used fresh corn ...

 

these things interest me:  does a hot cast iron cooking unit add to the result?  is mail-order cornmeal,

 

say,  that from the South ( white ? ) or other areas not near to me, worth eventually seeking out ?

 

its not so much   " mine is best "  its what do you bake and why do you like it.

 

many thanks

 

this is an odd thing to be interested in:  no Sous Vide involved as far as I can tell


Edited by rotuts, 22 October 2013 - 12:17 PM.


#45 chileheadmike

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:38 PM

I just made some last weekend. Used the recipe on the back of the corn meal package as a start. They're calling for our first freeze here, so I picked the last of the green chiles from the garden. Added those after roasting, peeling, seeding and chopping.

Oven at 400F. I heated up the cast iron skillet. Once it was hot, I added a couple tablespoons of bacon fat and brushed it around. Came out quite good.

The cast iron caramelizes the sugar a little. It got pretty good reviews from the family.
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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

#46 FeChef

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:52 PM

I like to make scalloped corn, but on the dry side so its more like bread. Its baked in a dutch oven.



#47 Norm Matthews

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:53 PM

I was out of Marie Calendar cornbread mix a couple days ago so made some from scratch and I have to say it turned out better than I get from mixes.  I used the recipe on the back of Quaker Yellow corn meal with the following variations: I used cake flour instead of all purpose flour, brown sugar instead of white sugar, whole milk instead of skim milk, two whole eggs and aluminum-free baking powder.

 

Cake flour is low in gluten and so is Southern white flour so that helps keep it tender.  I have used cast iron corn shaped mold and a square 10" cast iron skillet both heated and oiled and oiled but not heated.  The last two times I did not heat the cast iron- both the corn ear shaped mold and the square cast iron, the cornbread came out easier with no sticking.

 

edit to add I also let the mixed cornbread batter sit in the bowl until bubbles started to rise in the batter. I think the wait time helped get a higher rise.

 

I previously posted this picture the other day but here it is again. It was baked on Sunday.

 

DSCN0828_zps76198571.jpg


Edited by Norm Matthews, 22 October 2013 - 12:58 PM.

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#48 rotuts

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:54 PM

FC:   Id like to hear more about this is you have the time

 

thanks



#49 rotuts

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:57 PM

NM:  thats really interesting.  were you using this:

 

 

http://www.amazon.co...pd_rhf_se_s_t_8

 
im interested in this if it fits in my BV XL.
 
by a day I missed the 25 free shipping  its now 35.  
 
thanks for your contribution, esp the heat/non-heat results


#50 gfweb

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:00 PM

I like a slightly sweet, somewhat crumbly cornbread that gets a nice browned bottom, which those who prefer SALTY cornbread must do without to a degree. Cakey cornbread is just yellow cake and has nothing to recommend it IMO.

 

Typically I add Goya fine-diced jalapenos. I've added caramelized onions and fine diced canned tomato (that had most of the water squeezed out) to good effect. Charred corn kernels are nice too.  Shredded cheese added during the last minutes on top is nice but doesn't store all that well.


Edited by gfweb, 22 October 2013 - 01:02 PM.

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#51 rotuts

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:00 PM

the mods have pointed to this older thread:

 

http://forums.egulle...-southern-type/

 

it interest me as various mail order cornmeal places in R.I. are pointed out.

 

I know some CBC's use a southern cornmeal emporium, but perhaps just for 'Grits" ??



#52 FeChef

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:08 PM

FC:   Id like to hear more about this is you have the time

 

thanks

Paula deans recipe is pretty good. I tweak it with alittle nutmeg and use two 8 oz boxes of the jiffy corn muffin mix. Im pretty sure i dont drain the can of whole corn when using 2 boxes. If im going for a more soupy consistency i only use the one box of mix and again i dont drain the can of whole corn. You may want to experiment before hand to get the texture you like. Everyones different when it comes to this dish, i get mixed reviews every holiday i make it. heres the link to the paula dean recipe. http://www.foodnetwo...cipe/index.html


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#53 annabelle

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:20 PM

A very heavily seasoned herbed cornbread, a double recipe baked in a 9x13 pan and left to stand out overnight to dry out a bit, makes an excellent stuffing for turkeys.  That is of course assuming that your family likes cornbread dressing and not bread stuffing.  I decided to try this one year when I was disgusted with how expensive stuffing/dressing mixes were and all the iffy stuff that was in them.  It turns out very nice, but you have to be careful not to add too much liquid to it or it gets more like a bread pudding when it bakes up.

 

It makes enough dressing (with cooked onions, celery and giblets mixed in) to fill a turkey cavity and a baking dish, too.



#54 rotuts

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:30 PM

in my extensive experience, most  Swells like bread stuffing in their birds.

 

it takes an Ultra-Swell to move to Cornbread for those birds.   Ultra.  Night and Day.

 

"  Its From Corn  "

 

Earl Butz, secretary of Agriculture

 

https://www.google.c...lient=firefox-a

 

actually a very smart guy. just smart at the wrong time. 


Edited by rotuts, 22 October 2013 - 01:33 PM.


#55 Tri2Cook

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:52 PM

I recently tried Sean Brock's Husk Cornbread recipe. I'm not sure if I'm ready to call it my favorite... but it was really good. Not sweet, not cake-like and it has that crispy bottom that is essential to not having a soggy mess when juice from the beans or greens runs under it on the plate.


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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#56 rotuts

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:08 PM

Of course  Ill have to review the AltonBrown archives I have on the HardDisc(s)



#57 Steve Irby

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 03:17 PM

I make cornbread just like my mom taught me.  She was from a very poor family and they would have cornbread for breakfast because they couldn't afford flour. It was just four ingredients- cornmeal, buttermilk, eggs and baking soda plus a little salt.   Later on the basic recipe became Martha White Self Rising Cornmeal (With Hot Rize!), eggs and buttermilk cooked in cast iron pan with a lot of bacon renderings.  

 

For a small batch about 1 cup of cornmeal, 1 egg and enough buttermilk to make a very loose batter.  It should almost self-level when it's poured in the pan.  Preheat a cast iron skillet\muffin pan\sticks with a generous dose of bacon renderings in a 450 degree oven.  When the drippins start to smoke pour the excess grease into the batter and then pour the batter into the skillets and cook until browned.  I've attached a photo of some cornbread from a few weeks ago using the same cast iron pans that I will pass onto the next generation.

 

P1020106(2).JPG


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#58 Norm Matthews

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 03:46 PM

 

NM:  thats really interesting.  were you using this:

 

 

http://www.amazon.co...pd_rhf_se_s_t_8

 
im interested in this if it fits in my BV XL.
 
by a day I missed the 25 free shipping  its now 35.  
 
thanks for your contribution, esp the heat/non-heat results

 

That is the same size as mine.  Mine does not have the handle on the top and does not have a brand name on the bottom. It says Made in USA 10 1/2 square skillet and was not pre-seasoned. I have had it for around 40 years.  



#59 annabelle

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:25 PM

Now that is some nice cornbread, Steve!


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#60 andiesenji

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:51 PM

the mods have pointed to this older thread:

 

http://forums.egulle...-southern-type/

 

it interest me as various mail order cornmeal places in R.I. are pointed out.

 

I know some CBC's use a southern cornmeal emporium, but perhaps just for 'Grits" ??

Sorry I did not see this earlier today.

You posted the link to the eG topic in which I posted the same photos I put up on my blog about cornbread

However at the end of the photos on the blog I have listed several  online vendors that sell  cornmeal as well as grits.

I have sampled every item, including the various  self-rising cornmeal mixes  offered by Southern Connoisseur  and I have tried some from other vendors that did not come up to my standards so I omitted them from the list.

 

From Anson mills I buy both the  coarse and fine  WHITE cornmeal and blend them together to get the texture I want.  Other folks like the fine and some people like the yellow meal but I grew up on the white and it is still my preference - I think the white is sweeter.

 

I currently have a 5-pound bag of the white corn meal from Falls Mill.

I also have blue corn meal, red corn meal and the organic stone ground corn meal from Purcell Mountain farms.  The latter is pale yellow, sort of in between regular yellow and white.   These are excellent but include the "germ" so have to be kept in the freezer because they go rancid rapidly at room temp.


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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening





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