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Japanese School lunches


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#61 torakris

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 12:52 AM

I know no systems are perfect, but I think the school lunch systems in Japan are among the best that you can think of, especially those in rural areas like my town, where locally grown safe farm products are used whenever possible. (This is rather off-topic, but a lot of efforts are being made in Japan these days toward "jisan jisho" 地産地消, or "local production for local consumption", and these efforts are compatible with the need for safe farm products for use in school lunches.)

Although the area I live is far from rural, there is also a lot o effort to use locally produced food as well. We receive monthly notices discussing the food used in the lunches and various other tidbits about the lunches and they always stresss the use of Kanagawa prefecture grown produce (this is the prefecture Yokohama is located in).

Sleepy Dragon mentioned that he liked the idea of the kids serving it themselves as it shows that they are not above such work, you should also know the children are responsible for cleaning the school as well, including hallways and toilets. This is also part of their education. All of the work done around the school is done my te kids (with the teachers) or by the parents. The parents help put up and take down decorations, plant flowers, clean up the yard, etc

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#62 Hiroyuki

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 01:08 AM

Although the area I live is far from rural, there is also a lot o effort to use locally produced food as well.

I'm glad to know that schools in even such urban areas as Yokohama are similar to those in rural areas in terms of school lunch system.

#63 torakris

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 01:09 AM

I just found this site that has some nice pictures of a Japanese elementary school, sort of a Day in the life of an elementary school student:

http://www.amphi.com...elementary.html

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#64 therese

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 02:28 AM

I also like how the kids in Japan take turns serving the lunches too, rather than thinking they are above such work. And therefore, above the people who do it.



This was actually common practice in the U.S. when I was a child, at least at some elementary schools in the midwest. Not only serving food, but receiving trays back into the kitchen and loading the dishwasher. The duties were rotated, and it was considered a bit of a perk, as you got to leave classes a few minutes earlier than the other kids. I recall wearing aprons and hairnets or caps.

The food was just as bad, unfortunately.
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#65 smallworld

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 02:56 AM

This is a really interesting thread.

The above link showed a few more good things about Japanese schools.
First, all the kids walk to school. Apparently this is becoming less and less common back in North America. My last trip back to Canada was a shocker- driving by schools (elementary, junior high and high school) between 3 and 4 in the afternoon took forever, because the surrounding streets were full of parents waiting to pick up their kids. Why can't the kids walk? That's what I did (and I know I sound like an old fart), what my parents did, and what kids have done since way back when school was invented.
And we hear so much about how parents these days are so busy (which is presumably why so many kids bring crap to school for lunch), but it seems like these parents had nothing better to do than chaufer their kids around.

Another thing- near the bottom of the link, there is a picture of students brushing their teeth. No explanation, but I'm assuming that brushing is an official part of the school day. Great idea! I don't remember ever brushing at school, until I got to hight school (and even then I did it clandestinely in the girls' bathroom, and was actually teased about it!).
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#66 torakris

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 03:13 PM

This is a really interesting thread.

The above link showed a few more good things about Japanese schools.
First, all the kids walk to school. Apparently this is becoming less and less common back in North America. My last trip back to Canada was a shocker- driving by schools (elementary, junior high and high school) between 3 and 4 in the afternoon took forever, because the surrounding streets were full of parents waiting to pick up their kids. Why can't the kids walk? That's what I did (and I know I sound like an old fart), what my parents did, and what kids have done since way back when school was invented.
And we hear so much about how parents these days are so busy (which is presumably why so many kids bring crap to school for lunch), but it seems like these parents had nothing better to do than chaufer their kids around.

Another thing- near the bottom of the link, there is a picture of students brushing their teeth. No explanation, but I'm assuming that brushing is an official part of the school day. Great idea! I don't remember ever brushing at school, until I got to hight school (and even then I did it clandestinely in the girls' bathroom, and was actually teased about it!).

There is really incredible variety in the way things are done at schools here.
Things like toothbrushing for example, the school my daughters go to started a encouraging the kids to brush their teeth after meals from last year, it is still completely "voluntary" and only those who want to do it. However a sshool just 5 minutes from my house has mandatory teeth brushing after meals and this has been in place for several years.

The kids are also walking to school in a group, in my area this is called a tokouhan and it is decided by the school. All the children from the same area are put together, the tokouhan can't consist of more than 10 kids so when there are too many they break into two or more groups. They meet every morning at a designated place at a designated time and walk in two lanes with the hanchou (leader) and fukuhanchou (assistant leader) in the front and the back to guide the group.
The same school that brushes their teeth after eating though does not do this and the kids all walk to school with whoever they want to or by themselves.

In the pictures the kids are wearing helmets, I have never seen that before, I have seen yellow hats.... In my area the 1st grade kids attach a yellow cover to their backpack to make them more noticable.

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#67 hillvalley

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 03:38 PM

Isn't the TV dinner in the fourth photo too much for a child of eight to ten years old?


No he eats it all. Americans are used to oversized portions.

I think that the lunch in the fifth photo is the best of all, but I don't like its appearance. They could make it look more appetizing, don't you think? Or, am I mistaken? It may have been beautifully decorated at first.


For most people in America, food is not an artform. It's many things, but not art. This child is happy as long as it tastes good. This was also leftovers, so I wouldn't expect it to look great. Finally, keep in mind that what looks appealing to you would put off most people here.

Any Japanese parent would be inclined to question the kid's parents, starting with "How dare you?". I guess that Japanese parents (usually mothers) would get up 20 or 30 minutes earlier than usual to make an acceptable lunch for their children rather than to have them eat junk food for lunch.


The Japanese culture is very different than the American culture. First, we eat much more junk food than you do. Food also does not have the symbolism and meaning here. As a teacher, I would be severely reprimanded if not fired for asking a question such as "How dare you?"

My students, for the most part, come from low income families. Putting food on the table requires long hours and low pay. Working two jobs is hard enough. Even if they weren't low income, American families lead a faster paced life than I believe you do in Japan. Just because a parent doesn't provide wonderful lunches does not mean they are not doing a good job.

As for the walking to school issue. We in America live in a very different world than you do. Crime is everywhere, whether people like to admitt it or not. Rich children, poor children, inner city and suburb children all live in more danger than children in Japan. And yes, saftey IS more important than excersize.
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#68 therese

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 04:12 PM

My son reports that of the options offered in middle school in Dekalb County, GA (I'd posted the entire menu a few posts back) he chose:

Fish nuggets with cornbread
Potato wedges
Creamy coleslaw (he dips the potato wedges in the coleslaw)
Mini ice cream treat
Skim milk (the other options are 1%, 2%, whole, chocolate, and strawberry---he likes skim)

The fruits on offer are bananas, oranges, and apples. He doesn't particularly like either oranges or apples (he has braces, so apples are a nightmare, and he doesn't like peeling oranges). He prefers bananas for breakfast, so doesn't usually choose them at lunch.

He describes the "grab and go" salads as "nasty", pointing out that they are pre-made.

So, a fairly starchy meal with reasonable protein (fish and milk), calcium (milk, and at least nominally ice cream), and a vegetable that's not ketchup (a reference to Reagan-era school lunch programs that classified ketchup as a vegetable).
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#69 torakris

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 04:28 PM

In Japan packing a perfectly balanced bento (boxed lunch) is a way of showing love between the parent an child as physical affection still isn't as common as it is in other parts of the world.
Here is a really wonderful article about how the Japanese feel about obento, especially the ones made by mom:

http://www.japantime...k20040325ks.htm

It really is very culture related, there are no rights and no wrongs just different ways of thinking. I have to admit that being a foreign mom in Japan can be frustrating because it is really impossible for me to understand this feeling they have for bentos as I didn't grow up with them.

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#70 therese

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 05:26 PM

I packed lunches for my son (and then later my daughter) for the first four years or so of their educations. I work full-time (very full time at that point in my career), so getting up an hour early to make a bento equivalent was simply not possible (not a question of love, but of mommy having a breakdown and being committed to a mental institution and then who was going to make lunch?). Fortunately neither my skills as a parent nor my love for my children are subject to question as a result of my having foisted celery sticks, grapes, and fig newtons (store-bought, no less) on my sweeties.

I would imagine that bento one upsmanship could get a bit trying...
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#71 therese

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 06:33 PM

I wonder if you could talk the kids' parents into switching to such "healthier" junk foods.


I'm sure hillvalley will chime in at some point here, Hiroyuki, but in the mean time I'll address some of these points.

It sounds as if she's already introducing the children to a much broader range of foods than is typically available to U.S. children. Taking the children's parents to task over their lunches would be seen as very much overstepping her bounds, and extraordinarily insulting to the parents. I am at a loss to describe just how insulting this would be, and how humiliating to the parents; torakris might be able to come up with an equivalent Japanese situation.

As for "healthier", your quote marks appear well-placed. I can't read the descriptions, of course, but they look pretty highly processed. There are plenty of snack foods masquerading as healthy in the U.S. market; the primary difference between them and potato chips is cost, as they offer little in the way of nutrition.

Truly healthy snacks (favorites in our house are cashews, edamame, almond crackers with goats milk cheese, olives, dried fruit) are expensive, and harder to find. I shop for food in a market where these items are less expensive, and not many processed foods are available, but that means that I have to make a separate shopping trip for things like soap. Many groceries in the U.S. don't stock even a single one of our usual snacks (except perhaps raisins and dried apricots).

School lunches (which my children eat; hillvalley's students apparently are not offered this luxury) are for many low income children the best meal of the day. Best meals of the day in some instances, as many public schools (my son's included) offer a full hot breakfast as well. The cost of these meals is partially subsidized for all children, entirely subsidized for many (the economic health of a school district may be assessed by the percentage of students who qualify for free breakfast).

As for what we can and should do, I think that it's already happening, albeit slowly. People increasingly recognize the need to monitor their diets more carefully, and I do hope that we'll soon see a stop to TV advertising of food directed at children. The real change will come when sufficient numbers of consumers decide to buy better, more expensive food. Manufacturers will offer it (because they want to make money) and consumers will actually buy (and eat) less food, addressing the current epidemic of obesity.
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#72 Hiroyuki

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 06:47 PM

Thank you, therese, for your comments.

Anyone who thinks that the current school lunch systems in Japan are something that we are "given" is sadly mistaken. Parents have tried hard to improve the school systems for their children generation after generation. And I'm willing to do everything I can to stop the current school lunch system of my son's school from degrading.

#73 Majra

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 09:59 PM

This thread has been a good read.

I think what is important to remember is that mothers everywhere love their children and want to do what is best for them.

We all have strengths and weaknesses, both personally and culturally. While it has been established that American kids don't eat the healthiest lunches on the planet, let's not send the whole generation to hell in a handbasket. :wink: :biggrin:

I happen to care a lot about food, as I assume any eGulleter does. Therefore, my family gets better (though not perfect) nutrition than the average American. But I don't believe this means that I love my kids more than my neighbor with the Lunchables.

#74 helenjp

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Posted 24 April 2004 - 05:49 AM

What a lot of interesting comments!

Walking to school. I'm really glad that when my kids were at kindy, I was able to walk to and fro with them. I resented it frequently, because I often had to leave my 1-hour-to-deadline jobs to go fetch my kids, but we watched and talked about so many things, and rarely had the kind of grumps from them or lectures from me that are so frequent with car trips!

That said, Japanese schools are really playing with fire on safety issues. The group "walking bus" thing is only used here at for the first month for first-graders, and when there have been reports of incidents in the neighborhood. Schools keep kids in without contacting parents for any old reason (from "decorating the classroom", to "class discussion", to "rewriting sloppy classwork") so we have no way of knowing when they are legitimately late, and when they have been shoved in a car and taken 100 kilometers away. A man tried to drag a girl into a car not 10 meters from my house. Luckily she screamed and kicked, and he ran away. Several times a month, my kids come home with a report of flashers or other weirdos trying to grab kids on their way to and from schools within few minutes' drive of us. There have been incidents with knives, and overnight kidnappings within the local middle-school catchment area -- way too close to home for me!

I can just remember the debate over whether or not Japan should change it's postwar bread-based (easy to transport/serve/store) school lunch system. Japan was just starting to feel its oats in the 80s, and apparently sent people to study the French system closely. They were impressed by the amount of effort, money, and other resources that went into making sure that French children knew that their traditional foods were an important part of their culture, as well as the basis of their health, and as far as I know, the current system is heavily influenced by the French attitude.

In New Zealand, I observe that school lunchboxes have grown huge -- partly to accomodate waterbottles, but mostly so that parents can fit a whole packet of crisps in there. Culturally appropriate? You betcha! And yet, when I had these junk food vacuum cleaners for Japan Club, they were game to try sushi, vinegared salads, green tea, etc.

Must stop raving and go and check the two school lunch menus for next week, to make sure that I don't serve up the same stuff for dinner that they were given at school that day!

#75 therese

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Posted 25 April 2004 - 05:23 PM

I think that the lunch in the fifth photo is the best of all, but I don't like its appearance. They could make it look more appetizing, don't you think? Or, am I mistaken? It may have been beautifully decorated at first.


I think this particular observation was particularly illustrative of cultural differences. For all the weirdness of Lunchables and TV dinners, they're actually the ones that look the most like bento. To the western eye much Japanese food looks every bit as artificial, not really like food at all.

The lunch in the fifth photo does look like the best to me as well, but I don't find that it looks particularly unappetizing. The idea of food that's been "decorated" is entirely foreign to many cultures, the sort of thing you'd do for a birthday cake or some other situation in which the time and resources wasted (and waste is what it's considered) are considered appropriate.
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#76 Palladion

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Posted 26 April 2004 - 04:26 AM

I'll just offer up an alternative view on the Japanese school lunch. I teach English on the JET program, at a middle school. Here, the school lunch simply isn't that great. Some days it's just bad. It's not particularly good to start with, but the major problem is that the food is all old and cool. The rice and the soup (if we have either of them) come hot in their own insulated containers, one for each classroom, and so are dished out somewhat fresh. But everything else for the meal comes already divided in individual servings in a little tray (one tray for each person) and ends up slightly below room temperature. Food is cooked in a centralized facility and then brought to school. It's delivered sometime during the second to last period before lunch, so it spends (on average) an hour and 15 minutes or so sitting outside the students' classrooms. The system that Torakris describes sounds wonderful; I wish it were used here.

Anyway, here's last week's menu:

Monday: Sliced kobbe (hot dog bun-style bread) with strawberry jam, hanbagu (Japanese meatloaf patty), vegetables cooked in ketchup, french fries, a piece of grapefruit

Tuesday: chiken and pork hayashi rice, fruit salad with white gelatin cubes 甘夏 (I don't know how to pronounce this)

Wednesday: Plain rice, miso broiled sawara (Spanish mackerel), "crab" "siu mai", some mixed Japanese vegetables, sumashi soup

Thursday: Crescent, Vegetable Kurokke, yakisoba, boiled wiener, wonton soup, piece of kiwi fruit.

Friday: Bamboo shoot rice, broiled pork, potato salad, miso soup, strawberry and piece of grapefruit.

Doesn't sound too bad on paper, does it? Now imagine it at room temperature. Greasy yakisoba, a fast food delight, but now all the grease has congealed on the noodles and vegetables..

Here's a couple pictures:

Last friday's lunch
Posted Image

Today's lunch (Fried squid, udon, a hard-boiled egg, fruit somethered in a sweet cream and yogurt sauce, and two little mochi balls with a sweet syrup and sesame seeds)
Posted Image


The other JETs here and I all like the days when it's just rice and a sauce, like curry rice, hayashi rice, or sukiyaki. Not because it's particularly good (though they are better than most of the other dishes served), but also because the sauce comes in the soup bucket and is ladled onto the rice before serving, so it's served hot, rather than slightly below room temperature.

(I actually tried to post this last friday, which is why it deals more with last week's food, but I didn't realize that it would take so long for my account to be activated.)

#77 Hiroyuki

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Posted 26 April 2004 - 05:19 AM

甘夏 (I don't know how to pronounce this)

Thank you for your informative post.

In my town, public nursery schools also adopt the "jiko" system (lunches made in the facilities within the schoolhouse).

***
甘夏 is pronounced a-ma-na-tsu, meaning sweet Chinese citron.

#78 torakris

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Posted 26 April 2004 - 02:55 PM

Palladion,
Welcome to egullet!
Thank you for the informative post, that really does show the downside of a central kitchen.
I was at my elementary school yesterday helping the 1st graders out with serving lunch (my school has 2 to 3 mothers volunteer for the first month of school to help the kids get used to the kyushoku system as not all of the kids came from kindergartens that had it). It was actually quite hot, they had beef stew yesterday and the mothers ended up dishing it out instead because it was so hot.
After dishing out the food all the kids that had been helping remove their gowns, hats and masks and then sit with the rest of the class (in the classroom) at their desks (pushed into groups to 4 to make a table), they the two "leaders" for the week go to the front of the classroom and lead the class in a "gokurousamadeshita" (thank you for all of your work) to the kids who had helped and then in a loud "itadakimasu" and then they all eat!

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#79 Katherine

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Posted 27 April 2004 - 08:33 AM

Most people in America do want their children to be served healthy foods at school, and they have a pretty good idea of what's healthy and what's not. The problem is that this is all theoretical to them.

In reality, most people eat not only eat lots of fast food, sugary drinks, and snack/junk foods themselves, but they consider these foods to be the appropriate foods to serve children. So many children rarely eat fresh foods at all. Given a choice, they will choose to buy fries or corn chips with cheese at school over the somewhat more nutritious meal which is served. (Yes, I see this at the schools I work at, table after table of chips and fries.)

So on the one hand, you have a "movement" (pitiful though it is) to serve quality foods in schools, talked up by people who rarely eat this way themselves, and never feed their own kids this way. On the other hand, you have school kids who can't be forced to eat anything they don't want to, and won't eat good stuff, even if their parents pack it for them.

But when it comes down to it, nobody's going to be willing to pay what it would cost to serve good, fresh food anyway, so this is all moot.

A woman I have worked with, who takes all kinds of weird supplements and lectures me on sustainable agriculture, and how we should all be eating organic all the time - eats mostly junk food herself, and got upset when the cafeteria wouldn't give her (diabetic) son two starchy entrees, when he wouldn't take the vegetable or fruit. She just saw it as interfering with his freedom of choice.

For most people, balanced diets are good in theory, just so long as they never interfere with anybody's freedom to choose to eat whatever they please. So it'll never work here.

I packed my own daughter lunch every day she was at my house, and she got what she wanted, so I know she always ate it. Peanut butter for four years? No problem. When she got older, she got attractive plates of leftovers. She's since thanked me for it. All around her kids were bringing in lunchables or discarding "healthy meals" packed by a well-meaning parent, who decided to give their child variety, and ended up making the meal seem just weird.

#80 Hiroyuki

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Posted 28 April 2004 - 12:56 AM

Some basic facts about my son's elementary school lunch system

Today, my son brought a school lunch letter home from school. According to the school lunch program for fiscal 2004:

Cost per meal: 260 yen
Subsidy from Shiozawa town and JA Shiozawa (for rice): 736,669 yen
No. of personnel: 3, who make lunches for 304 people (282 students and 22 teachers and other personnel)
Rice served on 4 days a week
Bread served on the 1st, 3rd, and 5th Fridays
Noodles served on the 2nd and 4th Fridays

#81 hjshorter

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Posted 28 April 2004 - 10:03 AM

I also like how the kids in Japan take turns serving the lunches too, rather than thinking they are above such work. And therefore, above the people who do it.



This was actually common practice in the U.S. when I was a child, at least at some elementary schools in the midwest. Not only serving food, but receiving trays back into the kitchen and loading the dishwasher. The duties were rotated, and it was considered a bit of a perk, as you got to leave classes a few minutes earlier than the other kids. I recall wearing aprons and hairnets or caps.

The food was just as bad, unfortunately.

My junior high did this (circa 1977-79). Students helped in the kitchen, served the meals and cleaned up the cafeteria afterward. It was a coveted job because you got lunch for free, and the food was really good. I remember one favorite entree was spring rolls.

The dinner rolls were made in house and freshly baked right before lunch, so the whole cafeteria smelled wonderful.
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#82 Sleepy_Dragon

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Posted 10 May 2004 - 03:32 PM

Here is a link to a local Farm to Cafeteria campaign here in Washington state:

http://www.pccnatura...mpaign2004.html

I hope it succeeds.

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#83 Hiroyuki

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Posted 17 May 2004 - 01:17 AM

Today's lunch at my daughter's nursery school (for kids 0 to 5 years of age):

1. 豆腐の五目煮 Tofu simmered with various vegetables
2. 切干大根サラダ Salad with dried strips of daikon (Japanese radish)
3. かぼちゃの甘煮 Squash simmered with sugar
4. グレープフルーツ Grapefruit

Oyatsu (snack served at around three o'clock):

1. 牛乳 Milk
2. みたらし団子 Mitarashi dumplings

Every day, a sample of the lunch served on that day is put on display in the showcase in the hallway so the parents can take a look at it.

Posted Image

Lunch is made right in the facilities in the schoolhouse, so I think it's hot when served.

#84 Yuki

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Posted 17 May 2004 - 02:10 PM

I really like the Japanese school lunch system and the wonderful homemade bento! All we get here in the cafeteria is mostly burgers with fries, the only vegetable is coleslaw which no one eats. Most kids just get the large plate of fries everyday with gravy or cheese and gravy(poutine). Across from the school, the only food available is pizza, sub, greasy chinese food, and the so called Teriyaki Rice.

If you serve a meal like the one on your daughter's menu in our school, no one would ever order it because it contains no fried food, no visible meat "object", and too many vegetables. :hmmm: Making lunch myself is the only way to go.

#85 Sleepy_Dragon

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Posted 18 May 2004 - 01:04 AM

Boy, that's the truth about the lack of fried food or visible meat item.

It was interesting observing some of the students in my school on the day one of the teams in my class prepared sukiyaki for everyone. The majority of the students liked it, but there was a group that simply wasn't going to eat it; it's brown and stewed glop with too many vegetables to them. More's the pity.

And these were adults. In culinary school no less. I can see elementary school kids reacting the same way in the US, unfortunately.

Pat

Edited by Sleepy_Dragon, 18 May 2004 - 01:08 AM.

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#86 Hiroyuki

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Posted 18 May 2004 - 02:09 AM

Have Americans gone that far? All meat and no vegetables? Well, I wouldn't be surprised if you said yes...

#87 torakris

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Posted 17 June 2004 - 12:46 AM

I have posted a photo essay about the kyushoku at my children's school here:
http://forums.egulle...opic=45272&st=0

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#88 Hiroyuki

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Posted 28 September 2004 - 08:01 PM

School lunch on Saturday, Sept. 25 (open day), at my son’s elementary school

Plain cooked rice
Bamboo leaf-shaped fish sausage deep-fried with batter containing green laver(?)
Salad with gourd and kounago (type of small fish)
Chicken soup
Japanese pear
Milk
Posted Image

The lunch room, where preparations are under way:
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Note that not all schools in Japan have a lunch room.

#89 torakris

torakris
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Posted 12 January 2005 - 08:43 PM

Yesterday I recieved a flyer from the elementary school announcing that our school will be celebrating the anniversary of the first kyushoku (school lunch) with a 給食週間 (kyuushouku shuukan) or kyushoku week from the 24th to 28th of this month.
The first kyushoku in Japan was on December 24, 1946 (Showa 21, on the Japanese calendar), our school is celebrating a month late as school was on break until January 11.
The menu for 1/24 will be the same as the very first kyushoku menu:
rice, milk, grilled salmon and pickles

on 1/25 they will serve suiton, suiton are like dumpling made out of wheat flour. After the war rice was very expensive and soups made with suiton were very commo, the soup may look something like this:
http://hanno3-web.hp...0126suiton2.JPG

on 1/26 they will have chimaki and yakisoba, chimaki are rice cakes wrapped in leaves and then steamed and they are Chinese in origin:
http://www.parkcity....himakigazou.htm
yakisoba are a kind of stir fried noodle:
http://www.taketomi....ko/yakisoba.jpg

on 1/27 they will have tonkatsu

and on 1/28 they will eat whatever dish turns out to be number one on the poll of favorite kyushoku foods that will be going on this week.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#90 torakris

torakris
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Posted 21 January 2005 - 08:33 PM

and on 1/28 they will eat whatever dish turns out to be number one on the poll of favorite kyushoku foods that will be going on this week.

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We recieved the results of the poll and number 1 was bibimbap!
2 was curry rice and 3 was a hamburger patty.
I am pretty sure that 10 years ago most Japanese didn't even know what bibimbap was.....
Mia said she voted for bibimbap while Julia voted for curry rice.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org