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Dinner! 2014 (Part 1)


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#31 rotuts

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 12:06 PM

Yum for all the above,  and a special Yum for that R.Beef plate.  the beef looks fork-tender  :rolleyes:

 

and doesnt seem to have the usual globs of fat which I personally don't care for.

 

do you remove The Globs ?



#32 judiu

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 02:55 PM

Chris, you could also remove the skin (which is, after all, ment to be a barrier by nature) season, and tie the skin back on, or cut the meat off the bone, season, then tie the meat back to the shoulder blade. Just thinkin'.
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#33 robirdstx

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 06:56 PM

Inspired by Ann_T's Proscuitto Wrapped Pork Tenderloin earlier this month, I changed out the bacon on an Eric Ripert recipe for proscuitto.

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Proscuitto Wrapped Pork Tenderloin with Peas "a la Francaise"

Edited by robirdstx, 09 January 2014 - 07:39 PM.

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#34 liuzhou

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 10:51 PM

Beautiful looking dish, robirdstx.


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#35 Ann_T

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 11:32 PM

Robirdstx, you elevated the dish.  The pork looks beautiful on the bed of peas.

 

I baked a couple of pizzas for dinner.

 

Pizza%20January%209th%2C%202014-L.jpg

 

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One plain

 

Pizza%20Sausage%20and%20Olive%20January%

 

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And one topped with homemade Italian sausage and black olives.

 

I was really happy with the crust.  I used the Saturday White Bread recipe from Flour Water Salt Yeast, but increasing the water from 720g to 820g.

 

~Ann


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#36 liuzhou

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 12:10 AM

You people are killing me! 

 

That is my idea of a perfect looking pizza, Ann_T.

 

Beautiful crust and two perfect toppings. And with that tiny bit of a char at the edges. I find most pizzas slightly undercooked, but that looks the business. I wouldn't know which one to choose. Can I have a slice of both, please? 


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#37 huiray

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 07:49 AM

Couple of recent dinners.

 

-------------------------

 

• Tofu sautéed/"stir-fried" with julienned ginger, browned minced fatty pork, chili garlic sauce [Lee Kum Kee], yuojialaodouban (友加老豆瓣) [Yuojia (友加)], Japanese-style Worcestershire sauce [Bull-Dog], lots of chopped scallions at the end.

• White rice (Basmati).

 

DSCN0277c_1k.jpg

 

-------------------------

 

Simple comfort food after a trying 1½ day power & heat loss with arctic conditions outside: Beef shin stew w/ carrots, Carola potatoes, shallots, daikon, garlic, dried Mexican oregano, dried thyme, sea salt.  (Garlic tossed in oil, reserved, beef browned, salted lightly, fond developed, water added &etc)

 

DSCN0289a_1k.jpg

 


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#38 Unpopular Poet

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 08:13 AM

 

I was really happy with the crust.  I used the Saturday White Bread recipe from Flour Water Salt Yeast, but increasing the water from 720g to 820g.

 

~Ann

 

Ann -- those pizzas are absolutely beautiful - if you don't mind my asking -- what did you use to bake them?  Based on the charring, I would assume some sort of outdoor oven at high temp...Really, really beautiful.


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#39 Ann_T

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 08:41 AM

Liuzhou,  Thank you.

 

 

 

I was really happy with the crust.  I used the Saturday White Bread recipe from Flour Water Salt Yeast, but increasing the water from 720g to 820g.

 

~Ann

 

Ann -- those pizzas are absolutely beautiful - if you don't mind my asking -- what did you use to bake them?  Based on the charring, I would assume some sort of outdoor oven at high temp...Really, really beautiful.

 

Unpopular Poet,Thank you.    I followed the instructions on baking pizza from the cookbook - Flour Water Salt Yeast.  Instead of my stone being near the bottom of the oven, I moved it to the top.  Preheated to 550°F for an hour, and then just before sliding the pizza on to the stone, I turned on the broiler for five minutes to boost the surface temperature.   Switched back to 550°F, slide in the pizza and baked for five minutes.  Turned the oven to broil and baked another two minutes.  I wish I had known about this method before.   My favourite pizzeria is in Victoria and the pizzas are baked in a wood burning oven.   Last night's pizzas were  very close, in looks and in taste.  All they were missing was that wonderful wood oven flavour.

 

~Ann


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#40 Unpopular Poet

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 09:10 AM

Thanks Ann!  I have that book, now I just need to find the time to read it.

 

-Dan



#41 robirdstx

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 09:23 AM

Thank you liuzhou and Ann_T. I was really happy with the substitution. When I had made the original recipe with bacon, I had some issues with the bacon not getting done enough before the pork was cooked. Not a problem with the proscuitto. I did add a little bit of bacon drippings to the roasting pan and the peas though.

And now I must make pizza tonight! I bake mine on a pre-heated steel in the oven much as you described, Ann. Wood oven flavor would be a definite plus.

Edited by robirdstx, 10 January 2014 - 09:25 AM.


#42 rotuts

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 10:50 AM

Tortilla / Chicken / green sauce / cheese    baked:

 

TortillaCkPlate.jpg

 

over here are the ingredients:

 

http://forums.egulle...take/?p=1948742

 

this is exactly what I had in mind.


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#43 robirdstx

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 07:53 PM

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Thin Crust Pizza with Sweet Italian Sausage, Mushrooms, Black Olives and Extra Cheese
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#44 Ann_T

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Posted 10 January 2014 - 10:15 PM

Robirdstx,  Looks good.  Those are my three favourite toppings.



#45 Dejah

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 10:02 AM

Finally got the Big Easy back from my brother's where we cooked the Xmas turkey for the family gathering. AND, the temperature's back to "tolerable" with no windchill warnings of -50C. Time to satisfy my need for BE chicken! 

Did two chickens so I'd have lots on hand to share and for lunch. The bottom one was marinated with "chicken rub" by a company called Szeged. I love their Hungarian Hot Paprika, so I thought I"d try their chicken rub. It's pretty basic but it was good. The top chicken is stuffed with Kaffir lime leaves - my favourite.

 

With -18C temperatures, I was able to cook the 2 chickens in 1.5 hours.

 

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Did up some mixed vegetables in the wok, seasoned only with no-salt chicken broth.

 

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We had some moo gwa (hairy squash) soup with pork and rehydrated oysters about an hour before supper.

 

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Dessert was "previously frozen" durian,  for which I have developed a craving since our trip to Malaysia! These are not as "aromatic" as the fresh, but they satisfy my need.,, :wacko:

 

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I accidentally ate the little piece of mint with the durian, and it tasted great together!

 

 

 

 


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#46 patrickamory

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 02:48 PM

Hors d'oeuvres including leftover Christmas ham, followed by a chicken and butternut squash khoresh.

 

Cheeses from lower left are Chollerhocker, Langres and Roomano (a Dutch cheese similar to aged Gouda but from a different family of cheeses)

 

horsdoeuvres.jpg

 

The khoresh used as much saffron as we could find at the house where we were staying, plus pomegranate seeds and cilantro, and plenty of butter.

 

squash_chicken_khoresh.jpg


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#47 Norm Matthews

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 06:11 PM

Dinner tonight was chicken breasts breaded with Parm cheese and panko, green beans and corn cut off the cob then creamed with roasted red peppers, cayenne, bacon, milk and cream cheese. Store bought Italian bread made with olive oil and rosemary.

 

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Edited by Norm Matthews, 11 January 2014 - 06:11 PM.

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#48 Franci

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 06:18 PM

Liuzhou,  Thank you.

 

 

 

I was really happy with the crust.  I used the Saturday White Bread recipe from Flour Water Salt Yeast, but increasing the water from 720g to 820g.

 

~Ann

 

Ann -- those pizzas are absolutely beautiful - if you don't mind my asking -- what did you use to bake them?  Based on the charring, I would assume some sort of outdoor oven at high temp...Really, really beautiful.

 

Unpopular Poet,Thank you.    I followed the instructions on baking pizza from the cookbook - Flour Water Salt Yeast.  Instead of my stone being near the bottom of the oven, I moved it to the top.  Preheated to 550°F for an hour, and then just before sliding the pizza on to the stone, I turned on the broiler for five minutes to boost the surface temperature.   Switched back to 550°F, slide in the pizza and baked for five minutes.  Turned the oven to broil and baked another two minutes.  I wish I had known about this method before.   My favourite pizzeria is in Victoria and the pizzas are baked in a wood burning oven.   Last night's pizzas were  very close, in looks and in taste.  All they were missing was that wonderful wood oven flavour.

 

~Ann

 

Yes, this method works really well, I tried in the past. Too bad with my new "old" oven I cannot do this!



#49 robirdstx

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 08:50 PM

Sorry, no photo of the finished meal but I did take one of the kitchen during prep.

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We had Chicken Piccata, steamed asparagus and a tossed salad.
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#50 Franci

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 08:55 PM

Recent dinners

Crescentine, broiled shrimps and pan seared scallops with broccoli stalks and carrots

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Roasted chicken and potatoes, string beans and Swiss chards stalks

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Spanish mackerel, sauté Dover sole filets in brown butter, steamed broccoli and cavolo nero

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#51 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 02:37 AM

One of those three--well, four--ingredient dishes that involve a bare minimum of effort. A recipe popped up on my Facespace feed that looked kind of fun. I wanted it today, tho'. Not in five or six days when the homemade pepper paste, which is apparently too salty anyway, is ready. The stuff just contains peppers and salt so I figured I'd find a workable substitute locally, if not the real deal. A local grocery store stocked a 'pepper sauce' that was really just red capsicums and salt and was, I suspect, the exact stuff the recipe called for minus the Portuguese name. I added a little bit of harissa to this, just for fun, and vac-marinated the pork ribs for a couple of hours. 

 

The ribs themselves were pretty good. Maybe the Portuguese stuff is a different product from what I got--like what polenta is to grits or sadza--but I reckon it worked. Might even up the quantity of harrisa next time. And hit them with some minced parsley at the last minute. The ribs, tho', were winners. The potatoes not so much. I reckon next time I'd ignore the recipe and boil them and basically just make roast potatoes underneath the ribs. Too, the pork I used was pretty lean. I'd be inclined to use a bit of rendered bacon fat or some plain old lard next time. Just to help the tatters along.

 

DSC_0012_zps448cf353.jpg


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 12 January 2014 - 02:38 AM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#52 annachan

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:13 AM

One of those three--well, four--ingredient dishes that involve a bare minimum of effort. A recipe popped up on my Facespace feed that looked kind of fun. I wanted it today, tho'. Not in five or six days when the homemade pepper paste, which is apparently too salty anyway, is ready. The stuff just contains peppers and salt so I figured I'd find a workable substitute locally, if not the real deal. A local grocery store stocked a 'pepper sauce' that was really just red capsicums and salt and was, I suspect, the exact stuff the recipe called for minus the Portuguese name. I added a little bit of harissa to this, just for fun, and vac-marinated the pork ribs for a couple of hours. 
 
The ribs themselves were pretty good. Maybe the Portuguese stuff is a different product from what I got--like what polenta is to grits or sadza--but I reckon it worked. Might even up the quantity of harrisa next time. And hit them with some minced parsley at the last minute. The ribs, tho', were winners. The potatoes not so much. I reckon next time I'd ignore the recipe and boil them and basically just make roast potatoes underneath the ribs. Too, the pork I used was pretty lean. I'd be inclined to use a bit of rendered bacon fat or some plain old lard next time. Just to help the tatters along.
 
DSC_0012_zps448cf353.jpg


I saw that recipe and thought about using if I can get my hands on some decent ribs.

It's wonton noodle for tonight. Not my usual filling - used chicken, prawns and shitake this time.

wonton.jpg


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#53 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:21 AM

I used plain old every day ribs and it worked fine. I reckoned if you got some of those meaty ones from Costco you'd really be in business. Still, if you can only get the ones butchers primarily sell for soup-related tasks, I reckon they'll do just fine. And I don't use those at all for barbecue.


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#54 davidkeay

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 04:55 PM


One of those three--well, four--ingredient dishes that involve a bare minimum of effort. A recipe popped up on my Facespace feed that looked kind of fun. I wanted it today, tho'. Not in five or six days when the homemade pepper paste, which is apparently too salty anyway, is ready. The stuff just contains peppers and salt so I figured I'd find a workable substitute locally, if not the real deal. A local grocery store stocked a 'pepper sauce' that was really just red capsicums and salt and was, I suspect, the exact stuff the recipe called for minus the Portuguese name. I added a little bit of harissa to this, just for fun, and vac-marinated the pork ribs for a couple of hours. 

 

The ribs sound great, but using that much of the portugese pepper paste does sound like it could end up damn salty. When I'm in new bedford, MA, I usually buy some of the pepper paste and piri piri sauce. They're both fantastic, with a nice slightly fermented flavor. The pepper paste is too salty to just use as a condiment, while the piri piri is a little more manageable (but still easily the saltiest hot sauce I have).



#55 Robenco15

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:29 PM

French Onion Soup and Avocado Souffle.

 

I've never made a souffle before, let alone an Avocado souffle, and I made this in a toaster oven so I was happy with the results. Can't wait to do it again though. Really enjoyed it. Apologize for the crap pictures. Took them right out of the oven on my counter next to my dish drainer.

 

Edit: no idea why they got rotated. Oh well.

 

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Edited by Robenco15, 12 January 2014 - 06:30 PM.

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#56 Franci

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 07:54 PM

Robenco, so long I don't have onion soup!

Tonight we had calves liver, cipolline borettane, yellow roasted beets. Pastina in chicken soup not pictured

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#57 Kerry Beal

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 08:05 PM

Franci - tell me more about the cippolini?  Cooked in balsamic somehow?



#58 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 02:13 AM

It was a hot start to a very hot week today. I had no desire to cook inside. 

 

DSC_0023_zps64923c77.jpg

 

Satay chicken as per the recipe in Cradle of Flavour. Accompanied by the recommended sweet and sour sauce (basically a 4:1 combination of kecap manis and lime juice sexed up with some sliced chilli) and the papaya/mango/bean/chilli/cucumber/etc salad from Zak Pelaccio's Eat With Your Hands.


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#59 Franci

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 06:38 AM

Franci - tell me more about the cippolini?  Cooked in balsamic somehow?

 

Not this time. Lazy me, I pressure cooked them. Very little water, extra virgin olive oil, butter, salt, little sugar, I cooked for maybe 3 minutes, deglazed with a drop of stock (the sugar caramelized just the right amount-lucky me didn't burn).

 

But I usually I do two ways.

1. classic: cipolline, oil, salt and sugar, just enough water, parchment paper hat, when they are cooked just right for me, I remove the hat, let caramelize and deglaze with very little balsamic (or water or stock)

2. my mom's way: saute' in a pan with some oil, when they get a nice color, deglaze with some white wine, salt pepper, a little bit of hot water with a tiny tiny squeeze of tomato concentrate and they go in the oven (375 F) uncovered until they are glossy  and tender, about 30-40 minutes, basting them once in a while.


Edited by Franci, 13 January 2014 - 06:39 AM.

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#60 Unpopular Poet

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 01:12 PM

Last night's dinner was my first attempt at the Maximum Flavor beef short ribs (3.5 hours at 250 F).  A friend had stressed they were amazing.  He was right.  Served up with a popover and some sauteed kale and yellow rice.  The beef was obviously the main focus.  Pretty sure I will never do 72 hour sous vide short ribs again after this recipe.   Salty, smokey and so easy that it was almost a crime.

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